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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, January 26, 1941, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1941-01-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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8 STILLS FOUND
IN ATU CAMPAIGN
^ 15 G Officers And Coast
Guard Plane Aid In Suc
cessful Hunt
During four days of this week
! atu agents seized eight
‘fjl- and 20.800 gallons of mash.
' On Tuesday ATU agents in con
. ction with the Coast Guard air
dare and Craven county - ABC
(fir-prs captured four stills with
0 total capacity of 1.550 gallons,
a j jo 40(1 gallons of mash in the
vorth Harlowe section of Craven
. untv Four additional stills were
located 'vhich wiU be destr°yed
later.
j tjie Hawkins township section
f Craven county on Wednesday,
thev seized a 150-gallon copper
.till and 1-500 gallons of mash.
On Thursday ATU agents with
jvputy Sheriff H. A. Croom, Sher
iff'Brown and Deputy Sheriff Bell,
f Pender county, seized a 500
“iipn still and 900 gallons of mash
in Caintuck township of Pender
county. ,
ATU agents on Friday seized a
200-gallon still in operation, '4,000
oallons o mash, and 15 gallons of
non-taxpaid liquor in the north
west section of Brunswick county.
On the same day they also cap
tured a 100-gallon still in operation
and 3.500 gallons of mash in Bruns
wick county. 5
HALIFAX PLEADS
FOR MORE HELP
(Continued From Page One)
remained in American waters un
der the neutrality law.
Lord Halifax said Britain needed
help quickly to fight off a threat
ened German invasion — forecast
for spring—in which Reichsfuehrer
Hitler was expected to make his
supreme bid for victory. 1
ANNAPOLIS. Mr., Jan. 25——
The U. S. Naval Academy played
host to some officers, midshipmen
and enlisted men of the British
Battleship King George V before
it sailed today, ending a 21-hour
visit to Annapolis.
In return. Lieut.-Commander
Chester Wood, an aide to the
academy superintendent, and sev
eral other academy officers were
taken aboard the new 35-000-ton
warship—one of the most powerful
in the British navy—for an inspec
tion visit.
SHIPYARDS WORK
ILL START SOON
(Continued From Page One)
relative to the beginning of actual
construction work on the shipyards
here.
Manager Named
Over a week ago it was an
nounced that Karl D. Fernstron,
professor in the department of
Business and Engineering Admin
istration at. the Massachusetts In
stitute of Technology, will be in
charge of the operations.
Officials have estimated that
1.000 or more men will be em
ployed at the shipyards at the
peak of the construction. The com
pany has already leased the old
W. H. Sprunt home at Third and
Grace streets for headquarters. It
'fas anticipated' that work would
begin very promptly after the new
corporation has signed a prelimi
asrv contract with the govern
ment. 5
The United States, at the end of
1910, had 500 first line aircraft
equal to the warplanes of Euro
pean belligerents.
ADVERTISEMENT
Piles — Gei
Relief Now
Millions of sufferers in the last 30
• ,.lJ ;lave found a way to get quick
nf r i “0II1 tbe itching and smarting
Piles. They use a delightful cool
m,,i„ s°othing and astringent for
ilp,.1 Pete>'son's Ointment. No won
t one sufferer writes, “The itch
=le&ni-ailr ?martinS Stopped, and I
i, night. Peterson's Ointment
hsh Tnel0us " 33c a box, all drug- ;
\lnn' VJ 111 tube with applicator,
g ba<* if not delighted
AS BIG BRITISH BATTLESHIP BROUGHT LORD HALIFAX TO U. S.
battleship King George V, one of the most powerful fighting ships in the world, moves up Chesapeake Bav after a serret dash
! n ,„L, anf'C t0 brinB Lord Ha,ifax- British ambassador-designate, ;o the U. S. Because thewaters attheA mapolisMd' j^ks wire not
| deep enough to accommodate the 35,000-ton ship, it had to anchor several miles off-shore. P° S’ Ma-’ ,l0lKS "e,e ,,ot
BULLITT SUPPORTS
LEASE-LEND BILL
(Continued From Page One)
us who are out of office are the
crew—and the cargo is America.’
Chairman Bloom (D-N. Y.), stand
ing with gavel raised, beamed as a
prolonged burst of applause rolled
from the spectators packed in the
large hearing room. Committee mem
bers joined in the applause, and
Bloom,,observing that it was Bul
litt’s fiftieth birthday, remarked he
bet the former diplomat never had
had such an expression of approval
on his birthday before.
In Self Defense
The day’s witnesses developed in
general the theme that the United
States was acting in self defense in
aiding Britain, and for its own pro
tection should increase that aid.
One, Major General John F.
O'Ryan, New York lawyer and
World war officer, advocated that
the United States enter the war at
once on the side of Britain, though
he added that the final decision
should be left to the War depart
ment.
“'The most effective way to fight
aggression is by offensive action at
the source,” O'Ryan said at one
point.
“Looking ahead, it is conceivable
that in our own interest we should
enter the war now in order to pre
vent a stalemate,” he said.
Dorothy Thompson, the columnist,
told the committee that Germany
intended to eliminate the United
States "as a world pow-er,” partly
by form enting civil war in this coun
try as soon as it could be isolated
from Britain.
Bullitt, covering almost every as
pect of the European conflict in his
lengthy testimony, told the com
mittee in response to questions
that:
The British, who had an “unbe;
lievably small number of guns” left
after the evacuation of France,
could break the morale of the Ger
man people by bombing if the
United States gave them enough
planes.
The state of the public mind in
the United States now offered an
“extraordinary likeness” to that of
France before the German invasion
—and France started preparing too
late.
•Absolute Knowledge
He had “absolute knowledge” that
the French believed they had so
placed their fleet in ports and had
so instructed their men to sink them
if it became necessary, that none of
the ships would fall into German or
Italian hands.
President Roosevelt would “rath
er give away his two eyes than
give away the Navy.”
Invasion of the Western Hemis
phere is “almost certain" to come
through an attack in South .Amer
ica, with Japan seizing control of
the Pacific, if Britain is beaten and
her fleet is lost.
A report that he encouraged
France to enter the war by indicat
ing that it could count on American
armed support was, “invented, as
we all know, by the German propa
ganda machine.”
jTAKEADVANTAG^^HES^OW PRICES! I
MEN'S—LADIES'—CHILDREN'S
LONG WEARING QUALITY
RUBBER
HEELS
17c
|SHOES DYED BLACK 49^ PAIR I
Al 1 materials and workmanship guaranteed I
H. L. GREEN CO.
amm■■■! j
OBITUARIES
MRS. EMMA J. KIMREY
Funeral services for Mrs. Emma
Jane Kimrey, 83, mother of An
derson Ruffin Kimrey, of Wilming
ton, who died Friday morning at
her home in Sanford, were held at
2 o’clock yesterday afternoon from
the First Presbyterian church in
Sanford. 1
CHARLES N. EVANS
Charles N. Evans, formerly of
Wilmington, died at 12:55 o'clock
yesterday morning at his home in
Los Angeles, Calif. •
Funeral services will be held
today at Forest Lawn Memorial
Park in Los Angeles.
Mr. Evans was a resident of
Wilmington for many years, com
ing here from Charlotte to become
cashier and later president of the
Southern National bank.
Mr. Evans is survived by his
widow, Mrs. Mabel Gillespie
Evans; and the following children,
Charles, Jr., Thomas, and Gilles
pie Evans, and Mrs. Ada Benson.
MOORE INFANT
Friends of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd
W. Moore will regret to learn of
the death of their infant daughter
on January 25.
CAPT. M. BRUCE WARD
CURRIE, Jan. 25.—Funeral serv
ices for Captain M. Bruce Ward,
71, former steamboat captain on
the Cape Fear river, who died
Jan. 15 at the home of his daugh
ter, Mrs. D. F. Rowe, of Currie,
after a long illness, were held
Jan. 16 from the graveside at
Point Caswell cemetery, with the
Rev. Mr. Kester, Presbyterian
minister of Atkinson, officiating.
Captain Ward is survived by
his widow, Mrs. Wilhemina Zibel
in Ward; four sons, M. B. Jr.,
and J. W., of Wilmington; John
Z., of Hampstead; and G. F., of
Baltimore; two daughters, Mrs.
D. F. Rowe, of Currie, and Mrs.
Elma Hunt, of Fayetteville; one
brother, Judge Ward, of Wilming
ton, two sisters, Mrs. J. O. Sharp,
of Wilmington, and Miss Ada Wil
son, of Masonboro Sound; 23
grandchildren and two great
grandchildren.
BAXTER McKEE
CLARKTON, Jan. 25.—Baxter
McKee, 82, died at his home near
Clarkton Friday afternoon, follow
ing a short illness of pneumonia.
His wife and daughter are now
confined to the home with flu.
Besides his wife, who was Miss
Corinna Shaw before marriage,
Mr. McKee is survived by one
daughter, Miss Frances McKee,
and one son, D. B, McKee, Jr.
Funeral services will be held at
the home on Sunday afternoon at
2 o’clock and interment will be
at McKee cemetery.
CLAUDE P. SMITH
LUMBERTON, Jan. 25—Funeral
services for Claude P. Smith, 81,
farmer and prominent churchman
of Back Swamp township near
here, who died of influenza Friday
at his home after an illness of sev
eral days, were held at 10 o’clock
this morning from the late resi
dence. Burial followed in the Fish
er cemetery near St. Paul’s.
Mr. Smith is survived by four
sons, J. B. Smith, of route four,
Lumberton; W. C., and D. P.
Smith, of Greensboro; and Quincey
Smith, of Fairmont; and three
daughters, Mrs. G. C. Caulder, of
route three, Lumberton; Mrs. H.
H. Parrish, of Fayetteville; and
firs. Corrin Capps, of Munden, Va.
D. A. JAGGERS
OXFORD,- Jan. 25.—(A*)—David
Averre Jaggers, 73, retired capital
ist, of Deal, N. J., died at his win
ter home here today of a heart at
tack. Funeral services will be held
here at 2:30 p. m. Monday.
MISS MILDRED ROMFH
MIAMI, Fla., Jan. 25.—(AO—Miss •
Mildred Romfh, member of a pioneer
Miami banking family and one of
the few women bank executives in i
America, died today. She was 47. t
- i
DR. MENNET r
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25.—OP)— l
Dr. Overton H. Mennet, 91, national
commander of the Grand Army of
■he Republic in 1938, died today. f
D. R. SHAW
LUMBERTON, Jan. 25.—Funera’
services for Daniel Ralph Shaw,
67 well-known druggist here, whc
died of influenza and pneumonia
Friday morning at his home fol
lowing an illness of ten days, were
held at 4 o’clock this afternoon
from the Chestnut street residence.
St. Alban’s lodge, local Masonic
order, conducted the rites. Burial
followed in the Meadowbrook cem
etery here.
Surviving are his widow, the for
mer Miss Beatrice Burgess, oi
Harriman, Va.; one daughter,
Miss Mary Elizabeth Shaw, of
Luberton; one brother, Allen
Shaw, of Lillington; four sisters,
Mrs. J. S. Sundy and Mrs. L. S.
Bossett, of Delray Beach, j'la.;
Mrs. J. G. Farrow, of Waverly,
Ga., and Mrs. Myrtle Pearsall, of
Waycross, Ga.
A niece, Mrs. Joe L. Meehan, and
a nephew, E. A. Sundy, of Lum
berton, alscf survive. 1
JOHN H. PAGE
CHAPEL HILL, Jan. 25.—(A>)—
J ohn Hinton Page, 19, University
of North Carolina sophomore from
Alexandria, Va., died at the uni
versity infirmary today despite
desperate attempts to check the
dread form of pneumonia which
seized him Thursday.
Page was given a number oi
blood transfusions during the vain
battle physicians waged to save
his life. One would-be-donor was
rushed to Chapel Hill from Wash
ington, D. C., in a dramatic air
plane flight Thursday night.
This donor, Mrs. Rose McMullen
of Washington, was said to possess
a rare type of bid efficacious in
fighting the type of pneumonia
from which young Page suffered.
Her blood did not match, but phy
sicians retained a quantity of it
to make a serum for inter-muscu
lar injection.
Young Page was the son of Thad
Page of Alexandria, secretary to
the Archivist of the United States,
R. D. W. Connor, and formerly
secretary to Senator J. W. Bailey
of North Carolina. Funeral serv
ices will be held at Aberdeen,
N. C. 5
BYRNES REPORTED
CHOICE FOR COURT
(Continued From Page One)
be announced for many weeks.
McReynolds will retire February
1.
The chief executive only laughed
when asked whether the nomina
tion would be delayed until after
congrss acts on his aid-to-Britain
legislation.
Byrnes has been designated one
of the floor managers for the bill
and senate informants said that
announcement of his appointment
to the supreme court would be
withheld until the measure had
been disposed of.
Byrnes himself was uncommuni
cative, but it was reported reliably
that he was receptive to a court
appointment. Senators Barkley
(D.-Ky), the majority leader;
Glass (D.-Va) and Harrison
(D.-Miss) called at the White
House earlier this week to urge
Byrnes’ appointment. 5
LONDON RAIDLESS
FOR SIXTH NIGHT
(Continued From Page One)
was damaged and a gas main was
punctured.
Up to midnight, London still was
without an alarm, making the capi
al’s sixth raidless night in succes
sion.
BERLIN, Jan. 25.—UP)—DNB, of
ieial German news agency, reported
onight that a long range German
lomber had sunk a 4,000-ton British
nerchant ship 220 miles west of Ire
and.
Brazil uses sweet potatoes to
atten pigs •
15 LOCAL NURSES
PASS N. C. EXAMS
(Continued From Page One)
of Duke hospital in Durham. Sev
enty-five persons who took the
exams failed to pass.
Sixty-nine nurses were granted
registration in North Carolina in
recognition of their registration in
other staets. During the same
period, 107 North Carolinians were
endorsed for registration in other
states.
On the honor list for making
high grades, besides Miss Hin
shaw, were Charlotte May Weeks,
Duke hospital; Carl Denyse Bry
ant, Duke hospital; Antoninette
Gregory Makely, Duke hospital;
Sara Paschal Lyon, St. Leo’s hos
pital, Greensboro; Marcella Paint
er, Duke hospital; Martha Bost,
Lowrance hospital, Mooresville;
Margaret Allen, Duke hospital;
Ruth McGill, Martin Memorial hos
pital, Mt. Airy; Audry Allen, Bur
rus Memorial hospital. High Point;
Mary Grace Benfield, Rutherford
Baird Weaver, Duke hospital; Net
tie C. Wright, Shelby hospital;
Mary Lois Newman, Martin Me
morial hospital; Martha Mae El
ler, Asheville Mission, hospital;
Marie Emily McCrary, James
Walker hospital, Wilmington;
Katherine E. Kornegay, Wood
ward-Herring, Wilson: Marguerite
E Pierce, Rex hospital, Raleigh;
Odell Armstrong, State hospital,
Raleigh, Mildred Beaty, Presby
terian hospital, Charlotte.
The list of successful applicants
included:
Wilmington—Lena Mae Aman,
Bessie Brown, Christine Dorma
Caroon, Agnes Adeline Carroll,
Fannie Maie Coates. Connie Marie
Cox, Dorothy Elizabeth Edwards,
Nannie Margaret Hamilton, Dora
Helen Harris, Mayzel Eva Lewis,
Marie Emily McCrary, Sarah
Catherine McDonald, Lucille
Southerland, Georgia Ann Turn
age, Lizzie Belle Worley.
Lumberton—Hilda Jane Baldwin,
Pearl Edith Briggs, Hattie Juanita
Brisson, Ruby Britt, Delphia D.
Baldwin Bullock, Sadie Rhae Fir
fax, Annie Laura Harrington,
Frances McGirt Jackson, Eula
Murphy Jones, Mildred Ivey Lov
ette, Jean Cameron McFadyen,
Martha Ella Nahikian, Mary
Aliene Nunery, Sarah Margaret
Prevatte, Marguerite Smith, Mary
Gladys Talley, Mary Etta Town
send, Lois Williamson Yoder.
Fayetteville—Ruth Beverlye Bar
ber, Sarah Noble Butler, Martha
Telle Dunn, Louise Freeman, Eula
Malinda Gray, Lucy Estelle Hall,
Veanna Lewis, Martha Lollar.
Mary Frank McMillan, Rachael
7o Relieve
Misery Hj|
(P^666
LIQUID.TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS
1 _ I
WELCOME/ IF RN ALIEN 1
IS R FOREIGNER.. IS RN J
ALIENIST ONE COHO C
^STUDIES FOREIGNERS?J f N.
No—an alienist is one skilled in the
study of insanity—but by studying
individual insurance needs we can
assure you the kind of automobile
coverage van should have—and at
savings prices.
SL _
BRITISH PATROLS
ARRIVE AT DERNA
(Continued From Page One)
information of what had happened
at Derna, but the fact that RAF
reconnaissance planes reported
spotting eight Italian planes burn
ing on the landing ground there
was considered significant.
It appeared that the Italians had
fired the planes before retreating.
New British and Allied success
es across half the continent of
Africa, to the south, also were re- ,
ported. I
Pursuing Italians into the Erit- ,
rean foothills, the British were re
ported over 100 miles inside that .
East African . colony yesterday, ,
nearly half-way to the Red Sea ,
Port of Massawa.
In the southwest sector of the <
East African offensive, the British j
were pushing into Ethiopia proper
opposite Gallabat. <
Magrum Bombed
In aerial support of both spurs
of the British offensive, the RAF
reporting damaging aircraft on a
field at Magrum, 45 miles south of
Bengasi. In East Africa, it was
said, hits were scored on rail lines
at Bishia, Agordat and Keren. Ital
ian posts, airplanes and mo
tor transport also were reported
bombed.
“Many bombs” were said to have
been dropped in a raid Thursday
night on the airdrome at Maritza,
Rhodes, a fortified Italian base in
the Dodecanese.
In Italian Eritrea, which faces
the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, advanc
ing British troops were declared to
have taken 600 Fascist prisoners—
including a brigade commander—two
guns and many transport vehicles.
In Ethiopia, where the deposed
Emperor Haile Selassie is reported
rallying the natives in an effort to
regain his conquered land from the
Italians, the Fascists were said to
have abandoned several additional
posts because of further British
pressure and that of rebelling
“patriots.”
Across the frontiers of Kenya,
Italian detachments were reported
being driven back by British patrols
“now operating well across into
enemy territory.”
The action in Libya, which oc
curred yesterday, was put by the
British at three miles east of Derna.
Four Italian tanks were declared
destroyed, two others captured and
the rest routed.
(In Rome the Italian high com
mand belatedly acknowledged the
fall of Tobruk and described both
British and Italian losses as “heavy.”
(The Italian communique said
Gertrude McNatt, Mary Elizabeth
Newlin, Flora Alice Peterson,
Catherine Ann Reaves, Elizabeth
Wallace Roberson, Reima Robin
son, Lula Virginia Vinson. 5
I"'"
that about 20.000 troops were in the
Tobruk garrison. The British claim
that many prisoners there.)
Derna has a population of about
11.000. It has no elaborate defenses
such as those of Bardia and Tobruk,
now captured by the British, and
the size of its garrison is not known
here.
The Derna harbor is small and
would be of little value to the
British.
On Way to Bengasi
By reaching Derna the British
were about half way to Bengasi.
Military sources indicated there
might be small pockets of Italians
between Tobruk and Derna which
the advanced mechanized elements
had passed, leaving the infantry to
mop them up.
It was thought the Italians might
attempt to make a stand in the hills
of Eritrea in the East African fight
ing.
The British already are reported
east of Barentu and proceeding
satisfactorily.
The first batch of prisoners reach
ed Kassala, in the Anglo Egyptian
Sudan, yesterday.
THREE
GERMANS REPORT
HITS ON WARSHIPS
(Continued From Page One)
Eumaeus, “loaded with troops,”
in the Atlantic, after a sharp fight
and that a second Italian subma
rine had dispatched the 5,655-ton
Greek steamer Eleni, also in the
Atlantic.
German dive bombers.'based on
Sicilian airdromes, already have
damaged the British aircraft car
rier Illustrious and crippled the
British cruiser Southampton so
badly it had to be sunk by British
forces. Malta. British Island air
naval base only about 60 miles
from Sicily, has been attacked re
peatedly and British bombers have
retaliated by attacking the Sici
lian bases. 5
There are 30,070 miles of navi
gable rivers in BraziJ. with regu
lar service of vessels over 17,130.
tThis is Detroit delivered price of De Luxe Coupe and includes all
Federal taxes and all standard equipment. Transportation, state and
local taxes (if any), extra. Bumper guards at slight extra cost. See
your Dodge dealer for easy budget terms.
Prices subject to change without notice
LOWEST-PRICED W I lift flflfl/C OPTIONAL AT SLIGHT
CAR WITH iLUlI/ I/If I VC EXTRA COST
SNOW’S ESSO SER VIC ENTER
THIRD AND MARKET STREETS
FINE COTTON GOODS SALE
Several Bolts Slightly Damaged at 1 / D *
Finishers. To go at 72 Price
—.
. Beautiful quality mercerized and sanforized broadcloth. Fine Nainsook
Batiste prints, pajama cloths, etc. Values up to 25c. All to go on sale Mon
day morning when store opens.
_10c yd.
NEW PRINTED
POPLIN
One case all new Spring patterns. Fast
color, printed poplin.
15c yd.
NEW WASH
PRINTS
Triam beautiful finish, fine count prints,
every piece t new pattern, Fast colors.
15c yd.
NEW 80-80
PRINTS
Beautiful all new patterns, small work,
stripes special color combinations, etc.,
soft finish. 25c quality.
18c yd.
NEW CURTAIN
YARD GOODS
One case new curtain yard goods in
cream and ecru, plain and dot mar
quisettes, nets, etc.
10c yd.
CHAMBRAY
STRIPES
Bargain table new wide stripe
Chambray, 18c value,
10c yd.
40-INCH
SHEETING
Good smooth 40-inch -sheeting.
10 yds. 59c
SEE OPR WINDOW DISPLAY

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