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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, July 16, 1943, FINAL EDITION, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1943-07-16/ed-1/seq-5/

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VAR IN SICILY
moves rapidly
irt;na War Secretary Says
Heavy Fighting In
Prospect Soon
.^HINGTON. July 15.—<A>!—
■ a forces in Sicily have moved
A“ ,rl0re rapidly than expected
{i[ . heaVy fighting” is in prospect
bu] re conquest of the island is
be nfeted acting Secretary of War
cnrrP . Patterson predicted today,
‘that “in the center of the
, a "and along the northern
' ct Italian and German forces
cos :v naturally strong positions”
ocC,UP',.e favored by good lines of
communication, Patterson told a
pr-Ou-C0''oodenfCortune in escaping
heavy losses at the beaches may
be repeated in subsequent op
*r*it°has been estimated that up
of 300.000 Axis troops, in
cluding 60,000 Germans, are de
Cl .. * cjpiiy They are capable
TsTong resistance, and they may
be readily reinforced from the
T'alian mainland. ...
Since swarming onto the island
, ,he toe of the Italian boot, Ai
red" forces have swung far inland
capturing the entire southeastern
" ,ier of the island, including
cveral good ports and airfields
rom which fighter planes already
re harrassing Axis troop concen
trations, the acting secretary re
ported.
Now, he continued, the current
nhase of operations on Sicily has
become "consolidating and enlarg
ing our beachheads, reinforcing
and supplying our troops, ad
vancing inland and preparing to
meet the inevitable counterattacks
of the mobile forces of the Axis.”
Motorists Are Hard
To Convince On Gas
Ration Curtailment
Viilmingtonians have been told,
lime and again, that they cannot
get supplementary gasoline for
long trips, but -many will not take
■■no" for an answer, the chairman
of the New Hanover War Price
and Ration board said Thursday.
The chairman reported that 75
requests for long trip gasoline are
on his desk now, none of which
will be honored. Requests come in
at the rate of about 10 a day. now
that vacation time is imminent,
he said.
The official added that requests
for supplementary gasoline to at
tend funerals and to visit the sick
are not legitimate. Drivers who
cannot accomplish these trips on
"A" ration gasoline will have to
remain at home.
it Saves *
sheDav
...\
_ \
^ ^ CORN
FLAKES
UUIItlUltnilRlIIIII WUIUI'lMOl
— .11 *7Ae 0\iy*n&l ■ —
Kellogg's Corn Flakes are re- *" ,'"
stored to WHOLE GRAIN NO- -ifaflfaLi* -
tritive values of Thiamin
iVitaminBi), Niacin and Iron. — ■ -
tin fi cii 1111 cm mi. linn in ft fiHUH
1 — I
SINCE 1892
KINSEY
blended whiskey
86.8 Proof
65% Groin
Neutral Spirit*
KWSEY DISTILLING CORPORATION, LinfleM, Pennsylvania
II
P_History Has Many Precedents For Today’s Attack
The Allied invasion of Sicily is a
repetition of history. This island
was originally settled by Italian
'"vi?der* •" the 11th century B. C.
300 years later Phoenicians from
seized points in western
Sicily followed by Greeks from Asia
Minor and Euboea. Down through
the centuries hordes oKCartha^
ginians, Romans, Vandals and
5pomords, the latter in the 18th
|_^^^^^century, invaded
Roman soldiers
seized Messina,
284 B. C„ and
acquired all of
Sicily by treaty
with Carthage in
241 B. C. Turks
attacked during
period 1528-70
Greek troops led by
Theocles took Taor
mina, 735 B. C. The
Mohammedans from
the south besieged
Syracuse, 877 A. D.,
and Normans swept
east coast during 30
year conquest in the
late 11th century.
Hannibal led Carthaginians against
Sicily 409-367 B. C-, lost island to
Romans in Punic War, then won
Sicily back. Saracens from Africa
plundered islond 827 A. D., German
emperor Henry VI conquered it 1194,
Spaniards invaded 1718, captured
the island 1734, and it eventually
j^^^^reverte^^talia^ul^^^^^^
sho^aSdatesS ^d”routesPof' t»”evionrs Srnnmi fT the ^'d-Mediterranean island has been a battleground down through the centuries. Map
es antt routes ot previous conquests, all topped in magnitu de by current Allied assault.___
Italian Utticers taken On Sicily
Express Amity For English People
By NOEL MONKS
Correspondent of the London Daily
Mail
Distributed by the Associated
Press
ABOARD AN ALLIED DES
TROYER IN THE MEDITER
RANEAN. July 14. —(delayed) —
Seated beside me in the ward
room of this destroyer is the bulky
55-year-old Italian general by the
name of Achille D’Avet, captured
in the Allied advance in Sicily.
He is trying to read what I am
typing but his watery blue eyes
are drooping with sleep and his
massive, close-cropped head is
nodding with fatigue.
He rouses himself with an ef
fort and says in a husky voice:
“Telit—tella da English peoples
we thinks kindly of them, and
tella my wife in Roma that I
fight lika da gentleman until up
comes this very fine gentleman
Montgomery.”
It is stifling hot in the ward
room but Achille D'Avet is clad
in full kit—the kit of an Italian
general in the field.
In the middle of three rows of
decorations nestles the ribbon of
a British military medal, but I
suppose it’s just another color
patch to Achille D'Avet.
He makes a fresh effort.
“And now,” he says, with what
seems a trace of hope in his voice,
‘‘We go to Engand, no?”
At this, another Italian sitting
opposite, says quickly in good
English, “Yes, yes to England we
hope. If it cannot be Italy then
let it be England.”
This man is about half as big
as Achille, is bald-headed, 10 years
younger and has sparkling blue
eyes. He is dressed in the winter
rig of Italian naval captain.
Bruno Preney is his name and
New Baguloi street in Naples is
where he hoped to retire after the
prospective defeat of the British
in 1940.
General D’Avet is the first Ital
ian general in Sicily to fall into
the hands of that great collector
of Italian generals, Gen. Sir Bern
ard L. Montgomery. Capt. Preney
is, or was until 24 hours ago, his
naval liaison officer.
I’ve had the haggard general and
the smiling captain on my hands
because those officers who are
not running the ship are sleeping
in bunks for the first time since
we began the invasion of Sicily
five days ago.
The general was too weary to
go into details of his downfall—
he surrendered just south of Syra
cuse—beyond telling me in a tone
that suggested he was piqued that
he had expected us to land in Si
cily on June 6.
When I told him that was just
Mussolini’s guess, he threw out
hs hands in that grand macaronial
gesture and said, “Ah, ah politics,”
and let his head sink between his
hands.
The little captain, however, was
eager to tell his story. He was
very upset, he said, that Mussolini
didn’t send the Italian fleet to
protect Sicily.
“Of what use is a naval liaison
officer without a navy at his back,”
he asked me.
He blamed the German air force
for not picking up our great in
vasion armada at sea (I smiled
at this and he hastily added, “ard
the Italian air force.”)
He and the general were just
rising from a leisurely dinner
when the news was brought to
them of our parachute troops land
ing Saturday night.
“We thought it was just a sabo
“and we sent word through to
Rome. My general, who was divi
tage raid,” the captain told me,
sional commander for all the in
vasion area, thought the Allies
would not invade in moonlght,
and proceeded to take steps to
deal with parachute troops. But
suddenly everything went poof.
“In daylight, when our planes
reported that many more than
1,000 ships were anchored along
the coast discharging troops and
guns we felt terrible.”
The little captain shuddered.
“We knew this was serious. Not
one word had we from Rome:
alas, never again did we hear
from Rome. We knew it was too
big for us.
“Then came Gen. Montgomery’s
men, about whom we had heard,
and we thought it would be hon
orable to surrender to such hon
orable soldiers like the Eighth
Army. So we surrendered.”
The general and captain have
made one request of me. It was
this, “Tell the BBC to mention our
names; then our people will know
we are safe.”
_v
IN SAFETY BOXES
SHORTAGE GROV.'S
MINNEEAPOLIS—CP)—A short
age creeping up on the U. S. pub
lic will soon be found in safety
deposit boxes. Wage earners
clutching War Bonds in their hands
have swarmed into banks and
trust companies in recent months
and rented safety boxes for the
first time in their lives, reports
the Northwestern National Life In
surance Company.
Prior to the outbreak of war,
an estimated 50 per cent of the ap
proximately 11,000,000 safety de
posit boxes in the United States
were rented. Today the occupancy
figure is estimated at 75 to 80 per
cent. By the year's end there will
be no smaller boxes vacant in
many regions, bank officials pre
dict.
Sued By U. S.
G. W. Vaughan, president of
Curtiss-Wright aircraft and chair
man of the bbard of Wright Aero
nautical plant at Lockland, O.,
heads list of defendants in gov
ernment suit charging delivery of
“defective and substandard’’ plane
equipment to our fighting forces.
ANOTHER CANDIDATE
Elmer Davis, 605 South
Twelfth street, is a candidate
for the “most honest man”
crown.
Mr. Davis recently found a
tin box containing 9,000 gallons
in fuel oil coupons. He prompt
ly turned it over to the police.
The chairman of the New
Hanover War Price and Ra
tion board explained Thursday
afternoon that the coupons had
expired, but that there are deal
ers who would not hesitate to
accept them. He commended
Davis for his prompt and hon
est action.
AIRLINES URGE
WORLD SKYWAY
Most Of Carriers Join In
Asking For Free In
ternational Routes
WASHINGTON, July 15. — (A>) —
Most of the nation’s airlines join
ed today in asking that the world
skyways be opened to all after
the war, with private ownership
and operation fostered and encour
aged by the government.
The declaration of principle,
signed by 16 companies at the con
clusion of a five-day conference
made it clear that the American
carriers were willing to exchange
freely the rights they sought in
other countries.
The statement was in the form
of a supplement to a reply made
jointly to questions on post-war
air problems posed by the Civil
Aeronautics Board. This statement
served also as a formal notice to
the CAB that the signing com
panies would file applications for
certificates to operate on world
wide routes.
The government was asked to
preserve for United States air lines
the use of facilities which this
country has been installing all over
the world for military purposes,
to plan for exchange of the right
of innocent passage over foreign
countries, and help the carriers
prepare for the future develop
ments in aircraft manufacture.
Missing from the list of signers
were United Air Lines, a nation
wide carrier; Pan American Air
ways, largest operator in the in
ternational field, and American
Export Airlines, which had begun
to enter the Atlantic field when
the war began.
United said in a statement that
it had declined to sign because
Next time you need calomel take
Calotabs, the Improved calomel
compound tablets that make calo
mel-taking pleasant. Sugar-coated,
agreeable, prompt, and effective.
Not necessary to follow with salt*
or castor oil.
Use only as directed on label.
the other lines would not accept
its proposal that the statement
not preclude it “from giving seri
ous consideration to jointly financ
ed and operated routes if it should
be found that the best interests of
ftie country can be served by suck
cooperative effort."
Pan American had no comment.
It was the only American air car
rier which did not join in the ori
ginal reply to the questionnaire.
lay Dm
III
BOTTLE
15*
pins
deposit
MELTING ICE CAN’T KILL SPARKLE
IN DRINKS MADE WITH
CANADA DRY WATER
ITS "PIN-POINT CARBONATION" LASTS LONGER!
P. S. Its special formula makes any drink taste better.
Prices Are Truly
Whizzing Around
at this
Special Summer
SALE
COTTON DRESSES
$3.95 Values up to $9.95 $5.95
, '
Ladies’ Summer Shoes
$2.95
Men’s Summer Shoes
Fortune shoes tf*0 QC
included ....
Berger's Department Store
709 N. 4th St.
Spark Plugs . 39c
Piston Rings .. 9c
Cushions _ 49c
Tents ...... $4.45
Flash Lites... 69c
Pliers . 29c
Trunks _ $8.95
AUTO RADIOS
Brand
New!
Complete
Equip your car now
with a brand new, mo
dern auto radio! De
signed for highest effi
ciency in reception, se
lectivity and all-round
performance. Buy
yours while they are
available!
FAMOUS^!
PHILCOS
At Slightly Higher
Prices
Fog Lites .. $2.98
Garden Hoes $1.59
Rakes. 79c
Nozzles . 49c
Padlocks _ 39c
Bake Ovens $1.95
Cook Pots_ 98c
PRE WAR TIRES
Grade 1, 2 and 3 at
Low Pre-War Prices!
Bring your certificates to Taub
man’s and get these fine, sturdy,
long - lasting tires of pre-war
make . . . and save real money!
Cornell Calvacades
4.75 - 5:00 19 5.50 x 17
$8.99 $10.73
6.00 - 16 6.50 - 16
$10.96 $14.75
Tax extra. Famous Cornell Super
Service Tires at slightly higher
prices.
Picnic Ice Boxes
$1.49
All m e t a 1,
strongly built
ice box that
you can take
a n y w h ere.
MOTOR OIL !
2 gal. can
$1.19
Use the pro
per Summer
grade oil for
oest perform
ince.
Pre-War Balloon-Type
BICYCLES
It’s easier to get a bike now. Come to
Taubman’s for complete information j
about obtaining your certificate. !
SPEEDSTER BIKES
Light-weight racer frame, with
chrome handle bars, kick stand and
modern saddle $3 | 95
i 1
FLASHLIGHTS
2-cell. All metal. Keep them
handy in home or car.
Less
batteries__
BATTERIES
Heavy
39 Plate!
$4.69
With Old "
Battery
Sturdy, serviceable auto batteries
that will deliver power for every
need.
SEAT COVERS f
Extra durable
for car-protec- \
tion. A variety
:>f attractive pat
ems.
f
GARDEN HOSE I
Serviceable, braided garden 1
hose that will last! Complete |
with couplings. 1
TAUBMAN’S
16 SOUTH FRONTWILMINGTON, N. C.

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