OCR Interpretation


The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, October 23, 1944, FINAL EDITION, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1944-10-23/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 6

'HELL ON WHEELS’
HARMON MOVES Of
• -- <
By HAL BOYLE
WITH THE U. S. SECOND ARM
ORED DIVISION IN GERMANY
Oct. 22.—OT—“Old gravel voice’
is b&ck in the saddle again as bas
of this famous “hell on wheels’
division, and he has spread it int<
the Siegfried line.
He is Maj. Gen. Ernest N. Har
mon, known to American tankmer
around the world as “Hardboilec
Harmon” and he has fought more
battles and killed more Germans
and taken more prisoners than any
other armored commander under
the flag.
For the first time Gen. Omar
N. Bradley, commander of Ameri
can ground forces, permitted to
day the disclosure that Harmon
had taken over again the leader
ship of the second armored divis
ion — the outfit which he original
ly landed under fire in French Mo
rocco in November, 1942.
And he gave up “a bigger” job
back home for a chance to lead
his veterans into combat again.
Last July this 50-year-old gen
eral — a .tartar to his officers but
called the “enlisted men’s buddy”
by the GI’s who man his tanks —
was rewarded for an unequalled
fighting record in Africa and Italy
by assignment to command the
23rd corps at Camp Bov4ie, Texas.
But Harmon did not want rank
so much as he wanted action. In
a personal letter to Bradley he
asked for a chance to crack the
Germans again. When Gen. Ed
ward H. Brooks, then commander
oi in« secuna annuicu uivwiun,
was elevated to a higher post,
Bradley promptly offered Harmon
his old “hell on wheels” division.
“Old gravel voice” — he talks
like a concrete mixer in low gear
—flew the ocean 'and took com
mand on Sept. 12 in Belgium. He
promptly bridged the Albert canal
under fire and sent his tanks roll
ing across Holland and into Ger
many.
That was only the latest of many
successes Harmon has had againsl
the Germans.
One of the founding fathers of
the armored force, he took com
mand of the “hell on wheels” di
vision the first time in July, 1942
and landed the bulk of it at Safi
Nov. 8 of that year. It was one of
the .major factors in the three-day
conquest of French Morocco.
After the Germans mauled the
American tanks in the disastrous
Kasserine pass battle Harmon was
rushed up and took command of
the first -armored division. He
found the Germans were attacking
every day at dawn and pushing
the Yanks back 500 yards.
“You attack at dawn tomorrow
and start shoving them back,” he
told h.s armored force. He stuck
to that simple formula for the rest
of the Tunisian campaign which
ended with his tankers rounding up
42.000 Germans and Italians to the
south of Bizerte.
When five German generals re
fused to ride in the rear of a truck
containing troops — they wanted
private vehicles — Harmon told
them bluntly:
“You are free to walk, gentle
men. I am too busy at the moment
to consider military delicacies.”
They climbed into the truck.
Harmon later took his first arm
ored division to Italy and spear
headed the breakthrough from the
Anzio • beachhead through Rome
pursued the battered Germans
north to Arno. His men killed and
captured thousands of Germans in
bloody fighting costly to both
sides.
_v_
Budget Pattern
' 9143
SIZES
(.10
MARIAN MARTIN
Pattern 9143. Only one yard of
fabric for this adorable tot’s jum
per, size 6. Make outfit as shown,
add another jumper in contrast.
Pa.tern 9143'comes in children’s
sizes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10. Size
6 jumper requires one yard 35-in.
Jacket, 2-4 yard.
This ' pattern, together with a
needlework pattern for personal or
household decoration, twenty
cents.
Send twenty cents in coins for
these patterns to The Wilmington
Star-News, Pattern Dept..,‘ 232 W,
18th St.. New York 11, N. Y. Prini
plainly size, name, address, styl«
number.
Fifteen cents more, brings .yoi
the Marian Martin Fall and Win
ter Pattern Book full of smart
easy-to-make styles. A free bed
jacket pattern is printed right ii
the book.
I Yanks Dig In To Plant Howitzer
Members of the gun crew of this 8-inch howitzer somewhere in
Germany know that there is more to firing a gun than pulling the
lanyard. They are shown here planting the heavy trails that hold the
big fellow in position and take its recoil when it is fired. This type of
gun figured at Aachen. U. S. Signal Corps photo. (International).
FDR To Ask Congress
For Security Quotas
WASHINGTON, Oct. 22.—(JP)—
Allocations of quotas of troops,
warships and planes to be used as
United States security forces is ex
pend to be proposed to Congress
under President Roosevelt’s call
for arrangements to act quickly
with other nations to suppress fu
ture Hitlers.
This is understood by officials
here to be the plan behind the
president’s declaration in his for
eign policy speech in New York
last night that he believed the
United States delegate to the pro
posed world security council
should have advance authority
from congress to act each time a
breach of th£ peace developed.
The president was not specific
but there was no question among
officials here that what he had in
mind was pre-authorization of the
use of limited complements of this
country’s armed strength to pre
serve or restore peace.
With this declaration. Mr. Roos
evelt stated his position on one of
the two outstanding questions re
maining to. be answered after the
Dumbarton Oaks conference of
British, American, ' Russian and
Chinese representatives had draft
ed a world organization plan.
The other question is* whether
each of the five great nations on
the proposed security council
should have a veto on action
against itself. This problem may
be tackled by leaders of the United
States, Britain and Russia in a
meeting possibly late next month.
The issue of how to provide Am
erican forces if and when the
United States decides to partici
pate in the world organization is
not a part of the Dumbarton Oaks
plan but a domestic question.
As contemplated by authorities
here, this is how the issue would
work out:
The first approach to the prob
lem by congress will come when,
assuming United Nations approval
of the organization, a treaty guar
anteeing United States participa
tion, goes to the capitol. Under this
treaty the United States would
commit itself to use force when
ever the world security council de
cided it was necessary.
Probably shortly afterward, an
other treaty would provide that
the United States furnish certain
number of ships, planes and men
which would be available for quick
use.
There would still remain the
question of whether these forces
would have to be used only after
reference to congress on each spe
cific issue.
It appeared therefore, that one
piece of domestic legislation which
would have to go to congress
would be a bill creating the of
fice of delegate to the security
council, and giving him specific au
thority to commit the limited for
ces in support of peace.
REGISTRATION
AT HIGH MARK
NEW YORK, Oct. 22. — (ff) —
Registration for the presidential
election, 16 days away, is at an
all-time peak in the nation’s larg
est cities, an Associated Press
survey showed today.
Including the service men and
women who have applied for bal
lots, slightly more than 12,000.GOO
persons have qualified for voting
in cities of more than 500,000 popu
lation.
The number registered in these
cities in 1940, a banner year in
most sections of the country, was
11,215,461, compared with 9,399,
748 in the “off year” 1942.
Each of 13 cities over the haif
miliion mark reports higher regis
tiation than in 1940 except St.
Louis, which expects a drop of
18,000 to 20,000 when official fig
ures are available.
Whether this year’s record reg
istration will produce a correspond
ingly high vote will not be known,
of course, until election night or
even later in cities which do not
count their military ballots with
'the others.
In 1940 the 13 cities’ combined
.vote was approximately 10,000,
b00, or more than one-fifth of the
VOtal popular vote of 49,815,312,
iheir combined vote dropped to
round 6,650,000 in 1942.
Here are the registration in
creases over 1940'
New York—216,675, taking into
consideration the 380,601 military
ballots mailed.
Chicago—198,192, including an es
timated 150,000 soldier votes. A
fewer precinct-, still are missing.
Philadelphia—13,-076, counting an
estimated 55,000 soldier ballots.
Detroit—108,088, including an es
timated 32,000 soldier votes.
Los Anseles—96.974. rniintim?
100,000 so.dier ballots mailed.
Cleveland—9,771, counting 46,511
soldier ballots ma’iled.
. Baltimore—51,441, including an
estimated 18,000 military ballots.
Boston—16,042, counting 19,720
military ballots mailed.
Pittsburgh—40,993, counting 47,
161 military ballots mailed.
San Francisco—40,776, including
an estimated 20,000 soldier votes.
Milwaukee—8,812, counting 30,
000 military ballots mailed. Mil
waukee registration continues un
til next Friday night.
Buffalo—2,640, including' 18,327
military ballots mailed.
RICHARD BENNETT,
ACTOR, DEAD AT 72
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 22.—(TP)—
Richard Bennett, long a stage ma
tinee idol and later a prominent
screen character actor, died in
Good Samaritan hospital today af
ter a heart attack. He was 72.
. At his bedside were his film ac
tress daughters, Constance and
Joan Bennett. A third daughter
Barbara, was reported en route
here from the east.
Hospital attendants .said that
death came peacefully to the vet
eran actor, who had been in fail
ing ^health for several years. He
entered • the . hospital about two
weeks ago, and had been In a eo
Ima most of the time since ’Friday.
BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS
' ~ 'f - . .
RADIO
£ WMFD Wilmington
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28
7:30—Family Alta;.
7:45—Musical Clock.
8:00—Daily War Journal.
8:15—Musical Clock. '
8:30—Blue News Correspondents.
8:45—Rosa Rio.
S: 00—The Breakfast Club with Don Mc
Neil.
10:00—My True Story.
10:25—Aunt Jemina Show.
10:30—Let’s Dance.
10:35—The Listening Post.
11; 00—Breakfast at Sardis.
11:30—Gil Martyn a#d the News.
11:45—Jack Berch and His Boys.
12:00—Glamour Manor.
12:30—Rep. Nat’l Com Pgm.
1:00—Baukhege Talking.
1:15—Musical Interlude.
1:25—News — Wilmington Star-News.
1:30—Little Jack Little.
1:45—Andrini Continentales.
2:00—Kiernan’s News Corner.
2:15—Mystery Chef.
2:30—Ladies Be Seated.
3:00—Songs by Merton Downey.
3:15—Hollywood Star Time.
3:30—Appointment with Life.
4; 00—Ethel and Albert.
4:15—The Gospel Lighthouse Hour,
4:30—Time Views the News
4:45—Hop Harrigan.
5:00—Terry and the Pirates
5:15—Dixie Mountaineers.
5:30—Lone Ranger.
6:00—The Sea Hound.
6:15—Sports.
6:25—News — Wilmington Star-News.
6:30-Ten, Two, Four Ranch Party.
6:4"—Henry J. Taylor and the News.
7:00—Heidt’s for Hires.
7:30—Needlework Guild.
7:35—Sundown Serenade.
8:00—Watch the World Go By.
8:15—Johnson Jubilee Singers.
8:30—Blind Date.
9:00—Counterspy.
9:30—Parade of Spotlight Bands.
9:55—Coronet Story Teller.
10:00—Raymond Gram Swing.
10:15—Top of the Evening.
10:30—Those Good Ole Days.
OVER THE NETWORKS
MONDAY, OCTOBER 2S
Eastern War Tune F.M.
(Changes in programs a-5 listed due to
corrections by networks . made too
late to incorporate. >
Note: Listings subject to change for
late-scheduled political broadcasts.
5:45—Front Page Farrell Serial — nbc
Wilderness Road, Serial Drama — cbs
Capt. Midnight, a Serial — blu-east
Hop Harrigan with repeat — other blu
Tom Mix, Cowboy Serial — mbs-basic
6:00—News Report for 15 mins — nbc
Quincv Howe and News Time — cbs
Sea Hound, Serial Sketch — blu-basic
Repeat of the Terry Serial — other blu
Prayer; Comment on the War — mbs
6; 15—America’s Serenade; Sports — nbc
Lyn Murray Chorus, Orchestra — cbs
Captain Tim Healy Story — blu-basic
To Be Announced—other bid
Chick Carter, a Boy Detective — mbs
6:30—Jeri Sulla vans Song Show — cbs
Jack Armstrong in repeat — blu-west
Volney Hurd News Time — mbs-east
6:45—Lowell Thomas & Newscast — nbc
World News and Commentary — cbs
Henry J. Taylor Comment — blu-basic
Captain Midnight in repeat — blu-west
7:00—Mercer’s Music Shop — nbc-basic
“I Love a Mystery,” Dramatic — cbs
Horace Heidt & His Orchestra — blu
Fulton Lewis, Jr., Comments — mbs
7:15—World War via Broadcast—nbc
Hedda Hopper from Hollywood — cbs
Volney Hurd and repeat—mbs-west
7:30—Carolyn Gilbert and Songs — nbc
Bob Hawk & Quiz Show— cbs-basic
Dancing Music Orchestra — other cbs
Lone Ranger Drama of the West— blu
Bulldog Drummond Adventures — mlfi
7:45—H. V. Kaltenbom Comment — nbc
8:00—The Cavalcade of America — nbc
Vox Pop by Parks and Warren — cbs
Broadcast of News (15 minutes)—blu
Cecil Brown News Comments — mbs
8:15—Lum and Abner Serial Skit — blu
Sunny Skylar Song Serenade — mbs
8:30—Howard Barlow & Concert — nbc
The Gay Nineties Revue — cbs-basic
Blind Date and Arlene Francis — blu
Sherlock Holmes & Dr. Watson—ipffs
8:55—Five Minutes News Period—cbs
9:00—Voorhees Concert & Guest — nbc
Cecil B. DeMille Radio Theatre — cbs
Counterspy. Drama of the War — blu
Gabriel Heatter and Comment—mbs
9:15—Screen Test, Professionals — mbs
9 30—Information Please, a Quiz — nbc
Spotlight Bands. Guest Orches.—blu
Human Adventures, Dramatic — mbs
10:00—Contented Concert Orchest. — nbc
Screen Guild Players & Guest — cbs
Raymond Gram Swing Comment—blu
Henry Gladstone in Comment — mbs
10:15—Ted Malone from Overseas — blu
Paul Schubert’s War Comment — mbs
10:30—Dr. I. Q. and Quiz Series — nbc
The Johnny Morgan Show — ebs-east
Bob Hawk Quiz Repeat — other cbs
Those Good Old Days, Variety — blu
Dance Orchestra for 30 mins. — mbs
11:00—News for 35 Minutes — nbc-basic
News Variety, Dance 2 h.—cbs 8c blu
Newsreel. Dance Orch. (3 hrs.) — mbs
11:15—Variety and News to 2a.m. — nbc
-V
buy war bonds and stamps
DAILY CROSSWORD ]
ACROSS
1. Vehicles
5. Crazes
9. A tower
(Aero.)
10. Mine
entrances
12. Genus of
lizard
13. Light boat
14. Inset
16. Metallic
rock
17. Article
(Fr.)
18. Enclosed in
a box
21. Pierce
24. Roman
garment
25. Hastened
27. Half mask
(F.)
29. Vegetable
(PL)
31. Valise
33. Breastbone
36. Aluminum
(sym.)
37. Anoint
38. Flower
41. Mohamme
dan god
44. Laymen
45^To make
peevish
46. Unaccented
syllables of
feet (Pros.)
47. Quantity of
paper
48. Never (poet.)
DOWN
1. Young swans
2. Expression
* of sorrow
3. Capital (It.)
4. Trap
5. Decorated
first letter
6. Girl’s name
7. Extinct
reptile
8. Shop
9. Buckets
11. Sow
15. Explosive
(abbr.)
19. Mountain
pass
20. Eager
22. Respondent
(Law)
23. Malt
beverage
26. Man’s
nickname
28. Monetary
1 unit of
Turkey
30. Total
32. Dramas
33. Cleansing
agent
34. Lodge
door-keeper
35. City (It.)
39. Female horse
w-u
Saturday’* Aiiwif
40. River (Fr.)
42. Of all (Scot.)
43. Border of a
garment
CRYPTOQUOTE—A eryytognm qwtmm
FZPQXFW XU RZBJOBJPKQJGPQCF
p Q J rxfg zl c RCF kzfukxznu el
W-N X V P — * V C K-P N U.
Saturday’* Cryptoquot*; SPEECH^-flYRUs!
•• -f J ■
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES— TOSSED OUT By EDGAR MARt, I
i ^oo CfcNH TO
Wb* TWtbt ^WaVt'b...
TVCAWb.^OO
C7APANESE I / GENERAL 06AKN>
QtJlNTELllSENCE I ( CALLIN6 FROM MANILA.
HEADQUARTERS II COLONEL JALOPI /
AT WENDAQ.jMMb^ -“T\
: uses ARE SO,Me DRINKS ^ THANKS, ^
■ / MADE WITH MV OWN MRS. BOBBLE,
HANDS, SERGEANT 8L0NEV. I DON'T CARE
J •, ]|-y—ip i DP
II TOLDVOUl
,ir> WAIT I! ^
SICK AND
DISCOURAGED,
SKIP HARDX
WITHOUT
AWAITING.
OR.BOBBS'S
RETURN,
BOARDS
THE TRAIN
ARRIVING
PROM THE
ISSExl.,
YOU'RE NOT ONLY RICHTN WORDS OF ONE
IN CHARM, BEAUTY AND \ SYLLABLE, TRISH -
TALENT BABY-WHEN YOU \THAT'S YOUR NEW
SIGN THIS, YOU'LL MAKE V CONTRACT
OLD BOY CROESUS LOOK
UKE THE POVERTY STRICKEN Yl/
CHURCHMOUSE/^ J
(Pf7HADDYUH KNOW? SAM
^ SETTER., THE DOGCATCHER,
DIDN'T KILL SANDY AFTER ALL I
rSURE1. I’LL LOOK 6EE! BUT
I OUT PER OLD SANDY- HE EATS
1 DON T TOU FRET I ^ A LOT !
OUT OUR WAY— By J. R. WILLIAMS
'IN I” 1-WONT OF THIS BOOK V WHUT MAKES N THAT’S vmumt '
THE WRITER HAS A KAN SAY, \ THIS COUNTRY \ ITtIueo
"1 AM SICK OF ENDLESS SUN- GREAT Vs THAT
SHINE, SICK OF BLOSSOMr j IT DON'T TAKE
BURDENED BOUGH-GIVE ME / US A WHOLE \ TO DO a?P
BACK ONE PAY IN ENGLAND, \ BOOK TO CHANGE 1 TH’VA^'
FOR IT’S SPRING IN'ENGLAND V LIKE TH^ In’^e to
NOW." THEN IN THE BACK PART \ WE’RE SO caat
A MAN SAYS, "I’M SICK OF RT wIdhaVE
WASTIN’ LEATHER ON THESE \ BOTH FEEUWS I MO?me\/eb
GRITTY PAVIN’ STONES AN’ THE ) ?N ONE SEN- i woo^l f *
, THE . PROBLEM SETTLERS
ce«t im r» 2iTu*^i, ^
nfW-NOO.VCfc VOO \jxv
TO'b'b'.W'tND'b SMb'b'eOQT. ^V\^,^W\\fv
TWtV *\Ot. L-, VA\ -
TfWVb VtfE OO M ftWGO!
WASH TUBBS-T~ " ONE MORE CHANCE By LESLIE
TWO YEABS OF YOUR FUTILE EFFORTS TO 6ET $4T.
LINK’S MEN HAVE EXHAUSTED MY PATIENCE, COLONEL
JALOPI! EACH TIME YOU REPORT,THEM WlPEPODT
THEY SHOW UP ELSEWHERE, VERY MUCH ALIVE.'
imrwn—n '~^*irinw mi
TWS IS WY FINAL WARNING!
SAVE MY FACE AND YOUR Nsffi
PRODUCING THESE MEN, QOrml
^BODIES, WITHIN SEVEN 0®
GASOLINlE ALLEY— SERVICE WITH A MOTIVE I
' YOU DON'T HAVE') NOT BAD. BUT THINK OF j
TO BE SO FORMAL ME GETTIN' A KICK OUT |
HERE, SERGEANT. I OF A DRINK WITHOUT M
SOU MAY CALL A-. A KICK IN IT.' /Wfi
ME JESSICA, f Svy— ¥:]
iDfv i iHtrKt aumeiHirxu ei.se BUT hi
I CAN DO FOR SOU. SERGEANT: HAVIN' THE T.W
THE SERVICE CENTER WANTS J OF MV lk"'i
SOU TO HAVE A GOOD TIME ■ —y-r—
DR. BOBBS_ By ELLIOTT and McARDLE I
WHAT IS THIS?-! J NO/ Si REE! I—. J YOU WILL
LET ME LOOSE » f WE DIDN'T COME LISTEN TO
-“X J FIVE HUNDRED f U2-MR. L
• MILES 10 MEET SHIP HARDY
—) DUST/ -7—
THE GUMPS— BATTLE OF WILLS ■
RIGHT/AND THIS SORRY BIX- 7N
EVENING IS THE FORMAL NO CAN DO TH&
SIGNING, WITH BENEFIT EVENING-PREVIOUS
OF FANFARE AND PRESS ENGAGEMENT
PHOTOGS/ v--—
—v X tsm*
LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE A DOG’S BEST FRIEND ■
RECKON WE’LL FIND f YOU SURE WELL, I LIKE l | AND ANIMALS ) I I THINK
PLENTY O’ MEAT AND I ARENt LiKE l’D I ANIMALS— SEEM TO LIKE YOU
BONES WERE- WWY, I FIGGERED V TWAT’S WWY ME, TOO— / YOU RE ,
WE’LL GIT FAT l I ALL DOGCATCMERSj I TOOK I-MORE OR J WONDERFUL
_ 1 WERE- ✓rflrJUlS JOB- IWtESS-yV_■>
IbsJL:_X _7
OIJR BOARDING HOUSE ... with ... MAJOR HOOPlfl
HOW DID X LIKE we THUUis"'
THE NEWSREEL gf§-5%g|f NO, MO-' \k WE SAW voi
AT THE BI30U ? , I FORGOT ff AT THE
EGAD/MARVELOUS1 ' _w|§|, ^AWK,' JL THAT'S
pictures op 01 w|gp7 how ^ butvw
/WARimes im { whatfw>could \ couldn't^
actiom — / ahi 7V> i see it, a all ole<^
RECALLED \W . SAY I NS-</ WORKlMS ) PLACc L^c
BOER WAR A MIGHTS V/ PATWWWW
DAYSZ-v. / AMD f l COULD VOW
_( SLEEPING ) >-— --
ALL DAY/ A /

xml | txt