OCR Interpretation


The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, October 31, 1944, FINAL EDITION, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1944-10-31/ed-1/seq-10/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 10

SOI CAROLINA
C PA N SHORT
COLUMBIA, S. C. Oct. 30.——
Candidates for the democratic nom
ination for Congress from the 2nd
district swung into one of the short
est campaigns in South Carolina
political history tonight with the
first primary only 36 hours away.
Seeking nomination for the full
two - year term succeeding the late
Rep. Hampton P. Fulmer of
Orangeburg were Richland county
Senator Joe Berry. Columbia Gas
and Oil dealer; D. M. Winter, Co
lumbia attorney and farmer, and
John J. Riley, Sumter insurance
and real estate man.
Mrs. Willa E. Lybrand Fulmer,
widow of the 2nd district congress
man who died unexpectedly at
Washington Oct. 19, was unopposed
for nomination for the three months
of her husband’s unexpired term.
Democratic party Secretary
James Hunter said 71,758’ demo
crats of the eight counties compris
ing the 2nd district were enrolled
..to vote in Wednesday’s primary. In
the event none of the candidates
for the full term receives a majori
ty, a second primary will be held
Saturday.
Fulmer’s death after nearly 24
years in the national House of Rep
resentatives left the party without
m nominee opposing H. G. Willing
ham of Columbia, republican candi
date for the seat.
_v
DEGAULLE’S ORDER
IRES COMMUNISTS
PARIS, Oct. 30.— Ufi —France’s
first governmental domestic dispute
a difference over the future of the
largely communistic “milice patri
otique,” appeared headed fora
compromise solution tonight as the
Council of National Resistance an
nounced it would submit proposals
on the militia’s status to the gov
ernment shortly.
The clash followed issuance of an
order by Gen. Charles Dc Gaulle’s
provisional government disarming
and disbanding the militia without
consulting the semi - official coun
cil, a coalition of elements which
cpposed the Germans during the
occupation and liberation of France.
Communists were angered at the
move itself and the C. N. R. at
the way it was carried out. De
Gaulle’s assumption of personal re
sponsibility for the order appeared
to have paved the way for the solu
tion of the minor crisis.
It was reported that the C. N. R.’s
counter proposal would be creation
of an auxiliary police force simi
lar to Britain’s home guard which
would absorb the disbanded militia.
This police force would take orders
from the regular police, an ar
rangement which eeportedly would
satisfy communists.
TFQTx<5jPETR0LEUW
I Eu 1/ JELLY THiS WAY
Press Moroline between thumb and finger.
Spread slowly apart. Long fibres prove
Moroline’s high quality. Soothing to
minor burns—cuts. 5c, triple size 10c.
MILL & CONTRACTORS
SUPPLY CO.
Deming Pumps
Mill Supplies — Machinery
Contractors Equipment
121-3 Water St. Phone 7757
FARRAR
TRANSFER & STORAGE
WAREHOUSE
DIAL 5317
STANDARD
Insulation Co.
Rock Wool Insulation
J|528 Nigh^
j ************..
! ! FOR QUALITY GIFTS ,
i > Visit our
GIFT SHOP
■ i Mezzanine Floor
!: B. GURR, Jeweler
j | 264 N. Front St
■ —n
V 1872 1944
Wilmington
Lodge No. 319,
A. F. & A. M.
A SPECIAL COMMUNICATION
of this Lodge will be holden
(THIS) TUESDAY, OCT. 31st,
at 8:00 P. M. for the purpose of
conferring the DEGREE OF
FELLOWCRAFT.
All qualified Master Masons are
cordially invited.
By Order of the Master.
Louis V. Swann, P. M.,
Secretary.
COLD WEATHER
Will Soon Be Here!
Have Yonr
FURNACE CHECKED
DO IT NOW
AVOID THE RUSH
AND LONG DELAY
Cumber-Moore Co.
17 N. Second St
It Was Flag Day in Aachen_
. # -—— ----—
Contrasting attitudes toward flags are seen in the photos above, taken in Aachen, Germany, after
its- capture by the Allies. At left, above, is a German prisoner who, taking no chances on getting
shot, draped himself in the biggest Red Cross flag he could find when he surrendered. The old
woman at right, although a German, is no Nazi-lover, judging by the vicious trampling she’s giv
ing a swastika flag, thrown onto the street by Allied soldiers.
5 CORPORATIONS
FILE CERTIFICATES
RALEIGH, Oct. 30.— MP) —Five
certificates of incorporation were
filed today in the office of Secretary
of State Thad Eure:
Johnson Cotton Company of
Smithfield, Inc., principal office,
Dunn, to engage in a mercantile
business. Authorized capital stock
$100,000 subscribed stock $10,000 by
T. H. Sansom. W. J. Thompson.
W. G. Smith all of Dunn.
Anders Colored Mutual burial
Association, Inc., of Sanford, non
stock; by Robert W. Anders, John
I. Mclver, James Palmer all of
Sanford.
White Cottage Products Company
Inc., of Burlington, to deal general
ly in goods, wares, merchandise.
Authorized capital stock $100,000,
subscribed stock $300 by Henry T.
Gurley, Frank S. Holt, W. B. San
ders all of Burington.
Latta Cooperative Dairy, Inc., of
Hillsboro, to deal in agricultural
products. Authorized capital stock
$100,000, subscribed stock $125 by
H. F. Latta, J. E. Latta, Don S.
Matheson, all of Hillsboro, and oth
ers.
Women Professional Golfers’ As
sociation, Inc., of Greensboro, to
organize golf club. Non - stock; by
Hope Seignious, Lydia H. Kinney,
Ann P. Seignious all of Greens
boro.
AMERICAN YOUTH
DESERVES CHANCE
CHAPEL HILL, Oct. 30.—(JP1—“
We must not permit America to as
sume that the remarkable capac
ities of American youth, such as
their courage and skill, so valuable
to the war effort should be used
profitably by the nation only in
time of war,” Livingston L. Blair,
national director of the Junior Red
Cross, said in an address here to
night.
“They can and must be given
an opportunity to contribute equally
to the establishment and mainte
nance of the peace,” he declared.
“Youth will not seek to destroy
that which they have helped to
build and they must be given an
essential part to play in the prog
ress of the democracy if they a*re
to make democracy an example for
the peoples of the world.”
Mr. Blair addressed the opening
session at «the Carolina inn here
tonight of the North Carolina con
ference Junior Red Cross chairmen
which got under way with a ban
quet and will continue through Fri
day.
-V
Red Aviation Experts
Recalled By Government
WINNIPEG, Oct. 30.—(ffl—Six
Russian aviation officials, include
ing several high-ranking officers of
the Soviet air force, have been re
called to Moscow, it was reported
here today, following their govern
ment’s decision not to participate
ir. the international aviation con
ference at Chicago.
The party left here today in a
Russian aircraft flown by a Rus
sian crew, presumably heading for
Edmonton.
When the officials landed at Ed
stood they were bound for the Chi
cago conference They arrived
i-.ere Friday, but declined to dis
close their mission.
TODAYS OFFER
to you who suffer
SadCouqts
(DUE TO COLDS)/
TTie first spoonfuls of Pertussin MUST*
promptly relieve such coughs or
money will be refunded. Prescribed
for years by thousands upon thou
P00*018—it must be good1
Pertussin not only helps reheve
, Any drugstore.-PERTUSSI He L
Federal Prison Warden Looks
At War's \Moral Casualties'
By HENRY LESESNE
ATLANTA, Ga., Oct. 30.— UR —
Warden Joseph W. Sanford of the
Atlanta Federal penitentiary sits in
his office here and watches, with
gloomy misgiving, young service
men—many of them veterans of
front-line combat—enter the psison
to serve long terms.
In ordinary times, he says, these
men might have lived their lives
through as good citizens. And they
are, he says, no less tragic figures
than the soldiers who lie buried
on a foreign battlefield; for they
are casualties of a different phase
of the same war.
What shoud be done for them?
“Insofar as it is humanly pos
sible, the moral casualties of this
war must be kept away from stone
walls and iron bars and the tra
ditional prison influences,” says
Sanford.
These men, in the warden’s be
lief, should not be treated as or
dinary criminals, but as casualties
of the battle of readjustment to
civil life.
Rather than be thrown with the
hardened or habitual criminal,
they should be committed to some
sort of camp or rehabilitation cen
ter, he says.
Sanford has spent a lifetime in
prison and probationary work. He’s
president of the American Prison
association. Affable, soft-spoken,
his manner suggests more the suc
cessful buiness man than the
movie or storybook type of prison
warden.
Mere sentiment does not dictate
any special consideration for the
soldier-criminal, he says. But it
must be remembered, he adds,
that many of them wouldn’t have
committed crimes had they not
been projected into “new emotion
al and physical experiences relat
ed to military services.”
Dewey Election Would Delay
End Of War, Byrnes Declares
WASHINGTON. Oct 30.—W—Wari
Mobilization Director James F.
Byrnes asserted tonight tbe elec
tion of Thomas F. Dewey “would
inevitably delay the winning of the
war.”
The Republican party in Congress
he said in an address prepared for
an NBC and Blue network broad
cast, cannot be relied upon to help
bring about a lasting peace. The
advance* text of the speech was
released through the White House.
Byrnes urged his listeners “not
tc vote for a change in administra
tion which would inevitably delay
the winning of the war and jeo
pardize the peace for which our
boys are fighting and" dying.”
The war mobilization director,
making his first political speech of
the campaign, said he thought he
had “given up politics forever,” but
.he went on, the forthcoming elec
tion will affect the course of war
and peace, and he decided to enter
this campaign because its issues
make participation in the presiden
tial debate “a solemn duty of citi
zenship.”
“Whoever heard of taking out *f
the box in the ninth inning of a
baseball game a winning pitcher
who is striking out batter after
batter?” he asked.
“The republican candidate may
honestly believe that in these fate
ful hours he could become com
mander-in-chief and do a better job
than the President, but do we know
that? And do our Allies know that?
I do not know ot any experience
he has had with such problems as
are daily decided by the command
er-in-chief.
“You and I know that Hitler ,and
Hirohito are praying for something
that will disturb the existing Unity
and harmony of the United fTations
and you and I know the defeat ol
Roosevelt would revive their fad
ing hopes, stiffen their opposition
and delay the ending of the war.”
JEWELRY STOLEN i
AT LOAN OFFICE
t_
Approximately $1,000 worth of
jewelry was stolen Sunday night
from the Cape Fear Loan office, 12
South Front street, in one of sev
eral break-ins in the city, police
reported yesterday.
M. Shmerling, manager of the
shop, who made the valuation of
the loss, said 20 men’s wrist
watches, eight or 10 pocket
watches, and eight or nine men’s
rings were removed from the dis
play windows of the establish
ment.
Entrance to the window, police
reported, was made by breaking a
plate glass window at the side of
the concern.
Wilmington police and Harry E.
Fales, of the New Hanover Bureau
of Identification, today were busy
conducting an investigation of the
loan office robbery and Others.
The Alcoholic Beverage Control
board whiskey store at ^fhird and
Market streets • was entered by
thieves by forcing the lock on the
door. 'W. D. MacMillan, chairman
of the ABC board, today was un
able to say whether any merchan
dise was stolen as “an inventory
has not been taken.”
Officers were also investigating
a break-in at an establishment at
609 Red Cross street, a residence
at Eighteenth and Market streets,
and several others.
TT
Gertrude Atherton At 87
Works Hard On New Book
SAW FRANCISCO, Oct. 30.—
OP)—Novelist Gertrude Atherson
is 87 years old today, just fin
ished with one book and hard
at work on another and con
firmed in her belief the "Ger
mans are a nation of fools.”
“They’ve always wanted
their thinking done at the top,”
she told an interviewer. “I
lived there for a long time
and I know. Theirs was the
last nation to be civilized.
What we’re going to do with
Germany, I don’t know, but
there must be r.o mercy.”
As for Japan, she confided,
"barbarians—they don’t belong
on this planet at all.
Mrs. Atherton has just com
pleted a 100,000 word history
of Northern California. She
doesn’t say what her new book
concerns.
-V
To make scratches in mahogany
"disappear,” paint them with io
dine.
CHINESE WILL MAN
YANKEE BOMBERS
« -
PUEBLO, Colo., Oct. 30.— W —
The first all-Chinese aerial bom
bardment crews to graduate in
this country are now ready to fly
American bombers in action
against the Japanese.
Ten of these crews, trained at
the Pueblo Army air base, receiv
ed their diplomas in ceremonies
yesterday. This is the only base
in the United States where the
Chinese are trained as heavy bom
bardment teams.
Col. John K. Gowen, director, of
intelligence training at second air
force headquarters in Colorado
Springs* presented the graduate
certificates to Col. Hsu Kank-Li
ang. Chinese commandant, who re
ceived them in behalf of his coun
trymen.
The Chinese students are sent to
Pueblo from othtr U S. training
bases. Here they are coordinated
and trained to fight as an air
team and as members of mass
formation flights.
-V
Light your sink, range and work
counters in the kitchen so that
your eyes can see what your hands
are doing. _
WILLIAM B. JERVAY
RALEIGH, Oct. 30. — Funeral
services for William R. Jervsy,
who died in Douglas hospital,
Philadelphia, Pa., Sunday after
noon, will be conducted from St.
Ambrose Episcopal church, Ra
leigh, Wednesday afternoon at 2
o’clock. Prior to the services, the
body will be at 125 West Cabarrus
St, Raleigh.
Jervay, who was a postal em
ployee at Raleigh for over 20
years, was business manager and
one of the founders
Fear Journal, Ne^ro „ the Cs„
-
storm RepIJ7Iv
WASHINGTON 0„t
Approval of expenriit,,' 3M
$100,000 to repair hum! °f “31*
age at the J. A. JonJf!?* **
tion Co. Shipyard, BrunJ0?^
was announced today bv*‘ck' Ca,
time commission. y tn« Mart
Game animals should^
the same day they are kili^*1
NEED A LOAN-SEE US TQDAyi
Within 24 hours we will give you a commit'
ment. The discriminating borrower is Usin"
our type loan. Get the cost before you refinan<>0
Of
borrow.
Three
The / Million Dollar
Carolina Building and Loan Lag,
“Member Federal Home Loan Bank”
W A. FONVIELLE, Sec.-Treaa,
ROGER MOORE, Pres. W. D. JONES, Asst See Tr
M. G. JAMES. V-Prea. J. 0. CARR., Atty.
NOTICE
1944 City and County taxes are now due,
Discount will be allowed on 1944 taxes
paid on or before Nov. 1st, 1944.
C. R. Morse, City and County ^
Tax Collector.
—^mem
V -
IF YOU HAD A NECK
AS LONG AS
THIS FELLOW
AND HAD
SORE THROAT
DUE TO COLDS
i _ ' t
I
A'Ff SHOULD QUICKLY RELIEVE IT |
DIFFERENTIAL LUBRICATION
MUST STAND UP UNDER
'SHOCK LOAD" PRESSURES
UP TO SO TONS
PER SO. IN./
(Correct lubrication is YtTAL HERE. ;
LET YOUR ESSO DEALER DRAIN OLD
LUBRICANT NOW-PUT IN NEW ESSO LUBRICANT
SPECIFIED FOR YOUR CAR MODEL/
U&jSTY COOUH& SySTEMS 1
ARC 61$ CAUSES OF vj
serious ENGINE OVER* |
HEATING, have vour
radiator flushed.
r REMEMBER, HELP IS
SCARCE, BUT REAL Ctf CIS
VITAL. IP YOU CAN &IVE ME A
LITTLE EXTRA TIME ON YOUR
CAR-ITYYILLHCLP! j
<$ASOUNE POWERSTHEATTACK-PONT WASTE A DROP f:
\ STANDARD OIL COMPANY OP NSW JO&CY

LET YOUR ESSO
DEALER DO ITl
FOR LATEST NEW
TUNE IN yOUR
ES50 REPORTER
EVERY DAY
com. 1+44, ESSO INC.
CARE SAVES WWJ
QUEEN ANNOUNCES SCHEDULE CHAN0E |
CITY VEHnCTOH - CAROLINA REACH-FORT FTSHEN
TDI AIL WAYS Effective November 1, 1944 ||
_ „ LL fSL SL SL SL LL SL SL LL SL sl
Run Wo-_1 2 SY 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 2 3 4 SY 3 4_3 4 3_j
Lv. Wilmington ..... 6=00 6=30 7=00 9=00 10=00 11=00 12=30 1=30 2=00 3=00 3=30 4=00 5=00 5=30 6=00 7=00 8=00 9=00 11=00 1=30
Masonboro Jet. __ 6=25 7=25 9=25 10=25 11=25 12=55 1=55 2=25 3=25 4:25 5=25 5=55 6=25 ' 8=25 9=25 11=25 1=55
Seagate- 6=50 3=50 7:20
Myrtle Grove ... 7=15 9=30 11=30 1:00 2=30 4=15 5=30 6=30 7=45 9:30 2=M
Seabreeze- 6=35 7=20 7=35 9=35 10=35 11=35 1:05 2=05 2=35 3=35 4=20 4=35 5=35 6=05 6=35 7=50 8=35 9=35 11=35 2=05
Carolina Beach.. 6=45 7=30 7=45 9=45 10=45 11=45 1=15 2=15 2=45 3=45 4=30 4=45 5=45 6=15 6=45 8=00 8=45 9=45 11=45 2=1
KuresBeach.... 6=55 7=55 9=55 . 10=55 11=50 1=25 2=25 2=55 3=55 4=55 5=55 6=25 6=55 8=55 9=55 11=55 2=2
Ar. Ft. Fisher_, 7=00_8=00 10=00 11=00 12=00 1=30 2=30 3=00 4=00 5=00 6=00 6=30 7=00 v 9:QQ 1Q:QQ 12=00_2j.
. LL SL SL SL SL LL* SL SL
B“" No. _1 2 SY 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 4_„
Lv. Ft. Fisher_ 7:00 8;00 10:00 11:00 12:00 1:30 2:30 3-00 4:00 5:00 ‘ 6:00 7:00 9:00 10:00 12=00 2=30
Kures Beach =._ 7=05 8:03 }}'?r !J'}5 J3:35 3:®5 4:05 5=05 6:05 7:05 9:05 10:05 12=05 2=35
Carolina Beach . 7=15 7=30 8-15 0=15 -15 2=15 :« 2=45 *15 4:15 4:45 5:15 6:15 7=15 8:15 9:15 10:15 12=15 2=45
Seabreeze_ 7=25 7=40 8 25 10-25 11-25 12-25 1-55 2-55 <?:25 4=25 4=55 5=25 6=25 7=25 8=25 9:25 10=25 12=25 2=55
Myrtle Grove__ 7=45 8=30 j 11:30 2=00 3=30 5=00 7:30 10:S
£ntro Jet"" 7:35 8 8 35 “l® o*30 rS J:5 5 25 5:35 6:35 7:35 8:35 9:35 18:35 12:35 3 05
Ar, Wilmington . 8:00 8:30 9-00 11-00 . E-M-IJO-ZJO-3=30 4=00 5=00 6:45 6=00 7-00 8=00 9=00 1Q:QQ 11:QQ 1=00 3=3jL_^
Legend-' LL—Long Loop
SL—Short Loop Bold figures denote PM __,
Grayvita Vitamins WORK
Restores Color Naturally
XniiSfSSK Hi* nation over haw reported
GRAYVITA Vitamins WORK, and thattheir
hair - returning to its natural color.
GRAYVITA Vitamins contain the same amount
of “anti gray hair vitamin” (Plus 450 Int. units
• a® ^.este<^ by a leading housekeeping maga*
zine. Of those tested, 88% had return of hair .
color. GRAYVITA Vitamins are non-fatten
ing, can't harm your “permanent.” 30 day
supply. $1.50; 100 days, $4.00. Phone
FUTRELLE’S PHARMACY
129 Princess St,
Fuel Oil
SPRINGER'S
Dial 5261
50 gal. Drums
140 gal. Tanks
———■

xml | txt