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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, November 03, 1944, FINAL EDITION, Image 2

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40 MILLION CARS
IN POSTWAR NEEI
ATLANTA, Nov. 2.—1.4'—At leas
40,000,000 Americans will want nev
automobiles after the war. Henr;
Ford, 2nd, told newsmen here to
day.
That is 10,000,000 more car own
ers than there were before t h <
war.
Ford, who assists his grandfath
er and the man for whom he i
named in running the vast Fore
industrial empire, discussed here
vi+h regional managers the Fore
Motor company’s $150,000,000 post
war expansion and reconversior
-• program
' The wartime increase in fami
lies, the amount of money earned
during the war, and the number
ol youngsters who have come ol
age during the no-car era will
accoui. for many of the new mil
lions who will own and drive their
own automobiles,’' Ford said.
And what wi’l the postwar car
be like? ;
The imrhediate postwar, cars,
Ford said, probably will resemble
the 1942 models. There won’t be
any super-streamlined “tear drop”
automobiles at the start. For one
thing, the War Production board
won’t permit any functional
changes.
However, the first postwar cars
of the Ford Motor company, he
added, won’t be “facelifted” pre
war models. While not revolution
ary, they’ll have more changes
than some of the industrys’ year
to-year revisions in prewar days.
The 24-year-old executive vice
president of the Ford Motor com
pany hazarded a guess the first
few postwar Fords would come off
the lines in about three months
after the green light is given to
start production.
It will probably require six
months, he added, to swing into
quantity production.
Ford said his company definitely
had no plans to manufacture air
craft after the war.
BRITISH, AMERICAN
AIR VIEWS DIFFER
By JAMES J. STREBIG
Associated Press Aviation Editor
CHICAGO, Nov. 2.—(/P—A broad
difference in opinion over the ma
jor goal of the international civil
aviation conference between the
United States and British empire
nations was emphasized today in
the statements of policy by three
delegation chiefs.
Stating America’s position for the
first time, Adolf A. Berle, Jr., as
sistant secretary of state, declared
apains'. Canadian plan—support
ed in general by the rest of the
British commonwealth — for a
world air transport authority with
power in the economic and com
mercial fields. He described the
United States view of the 51-nation
meeting briefly as follows:
An opportunity to assure all na
tions equal rights in the air.
The time and place to work out
agreements for air routes between
nations.
The time and place to lay the
groundwork for a new international
accord on technical phases of avi
ation.
The place to begin developing
an international authority — "A
splendid dream” which might be
achieved at some future time.
C. D. Howe, chief of the Cana
dian delegation, restated his coun
try’s plan for a world version of
the United States Civil Aeronau
tics Board.
Viscount Swinton, leading Brit
ain’s delegation, took a middle view
which aimed at the eventual world
authority view of Canada, but left
room for interim bi - lateral agree
ments to be worked out in accord
with the convention groundwork to
be laid here.
Beware Coughs
from common colds
That Hang On
Chronic bronchitis may develop if
your cough, chest cold, or acute bron
chitis is not treated and you cannot
afford to take a chance with any medi
cine less potent than Creomulsion
Which goes right to the seat of the
trouble to help loosen and expel germ
laden phlegm and aid nature to
foothe and heal raw, tender, inflamed
bronchial mucous membranes.
Creomulsion blends beechwood
creosote by special process with other
lime tested medicines for coughs,
It contains no narcotics.
No matter how many medicines
you have tried, tell your druggist to
lell you a bottle of Creomulsion with
the understanding you must like the
way it quickly allays the cough, per
mitting rest and sleep, or you are to
have your money back. (Adv.)
You Can Fight, Too,
Buy War Bonds
I r
KILLED IN ACTIOr
m. . rai
Pfc. George H. Wooten, (shown
above) was killed in action on
July 30 while serving in France,
according to word received by
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. H.
Wooten, of Maple Hill. Pvt.
Wooten was inducted in the
Army in January, 1941, and re
ceived his training at Ft. Jack
son, S. C., in the 120th Infantry,
30th Division. From there he
j was transferred to Camp Bland
ing, Fla., Nashville, Tenn., and
Camp Atterbury, Ind. Wooten
went overseas in January, 1944.
He was a farmer before entering
the service.
_
DOCTORS TO HEAR
OF DEVELOPMENTS
CHAPEL HILL, Nov. 2.— (IF) —
Some of the latest developments In
the field of medicine are to be
presented here tomorrow afternoon
and night at sessions of the North
Carolina section of the American
College of Physicians.
Beginning at 2:30 o’clock Friday
afternoon, the sessions will be held
in the medical school building at
the university.
Dr. Paul F. Whitaker, of Kinston,
president of the North Carolina
Medical Society, will speak at a
dinner session Friday night at the
Carolina Inn at 7 o’clock.
Speakers will include Dr. Edward
S. Orgain, Duke University Medi
cal school; Dr. J. P. Rousseau,
Bowman Gray School of Medicine.
Dr. W. Deb. Macnider, University
of North Carolina Medical school;
Dr. P. P. McCain, State Tubercu
losis Sanitorium; Dr. Donnell B.
Cobb, Goldsboro, and Dr. Claiborne
T. Smith, Rocky Mount.
Sessions of the Sixth District
Medical Society will be held here
Saturday jnorning, beginning in the
medical school at 10 o’clock.
Speakers will include Dr. Whit
aker, Dr. Samuel V. Vest and Dr.
Bruno Barelare, Jr., university of
Virginia Hospital; Dr. F. T. Harp
er, Graham; Dr. J. D. Fitzgerald,
Roxboro; Dr. W. Raney Stanford,
Durham; Dr. Verne S. Caviness,
Raleigh; and Dr. M. D. Hill, Ra
leigh.
Dean W. R. Berryhill of the uni
versity medical school will extend
a welcome.
HODGES ADVANCES
NEARER COLOGNE
(Continued from Page One)
by civilian pick and shovel brig
ades.
The strength of the attack has
yet to be weighed, nor is there any
way of telling this early whether
the full force of the powerful First
army has been committed.
From the width of the front in
such heavily-defended country it
appeared to be an assault of fair
size, but it was pointed out at
supreme headquarters that there
was no indication yet that it was
anything like an army offensive.
The attack on the gun-studded
rim of dunes on western and
southern Walcheren has made
“satisfactory progress,’’ it was an
nounced.
At supreme headquarters it was
believed the town of Westkapelle
was now in Allied hands along with
a three-mile coastal strip to the
north and south. More than half
of Vlissingen (Flushing) also had
been occupied, but up to 10 p. in
fighting was still reported continu
ing in the streets of the remainder.
The Germans held firm along
the Mark river throughout the day.
but in the eastern Holland corri
dor the Allies regained another
mile and a half taken by the Ger
mans in a counterattack last
weekend.
On the Seventh army front east
of Lineville, in a sector three miles
north of Baccarat, the Americans
captured three more villages,
Fremenil, Ogeviller and Petton
ville, on the road to Schirmeck
pass.
Northeast of Rambervillers the
Seventh pushed ahead in the forest
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CARL B. MARSHBURN
___FRONT AND QUEEN
» i
'(DEWEY SCORES
“1,000 CLUB”
(Continued from Page One)
fers something more—something
it doesn’t dare put in writing.”
Declaring that “we can only
guess what that is,’’ Dewey said:
'*Has this special privilege to do
with war contracts? Or is it spe
cial concessions on Income taxes?
Or is Mr. Roosevelt’s club peddling
special influence with the War La
bor Board or the National Rela
tions board?”
“One thing I do know, however,”
he added. “We are not fighting a
war for freedom in order to have
a government of special privilege
by a select few contributors or for
the communists.”
The New York governor, travel
ing through Pennsylvania in what
some of his aides called a “mop
ping up” campaign for that state’s
5 electoral votes, declared “it is
time to bring an end to govern
ment by secret deals.
“We want no secret deals either
for special influence in the govern
ment at home or in our foreign
policy abroad.”
Dewey, who earlier in the day
had received a rousing reception
during a quickly arranged visit
to Baltimore, planned to motor
from Wilkes-Barre to Scranton be
fore boarding his special train
again for an overnight ride to Al
bany.
i/cwcjr w as tuecrca aiung »
torch-lit parade in Wilkes-Barre
from the railroac} station to King
ston armory. There he found a
crowd estimated by state police
Commissioner C. M. Wilhelm at
15,000 overflowing the armory into
an adjacent ball park, all noisy
and flag-waving.
The New York governor’s men
tion of Sidney Hillman’s name as
among the “higher bidders” for
the democratic party brought loud
boos
Calling for an end of the New
Deal “secrecy,” both in domestic
and foreign affairs, Dewey declar
ed “it has been left to the Prime
Minister of England to tell us what
has happened” at Mr. Roosevelt's
conferences with Premier Stalin
and other Allied leaders.
It was the republican presiden
tial candidate’s third sortie into
Pennsylvania since his nomina
tion, and followed a fourth term
campaign trip to Philadelphia by
Roosevelt last Friday.
Dewey, declaring Mr. Roose
velt’s New Deal had “failed miser
ably for eight peacetime years,”
told a cheering Baltimore theatre
audience this noon that the Presi
dent, “in his desperate desire for
16 years in the White House, is
straining every conceivable effort,
including offering to sell our gov
ernment for a thousand dollars to
any mar..’’
Dewey addressed an overflow
audience in a Baltimore theatre
seating 3,000 after a five-mile mo
tor parade through downtown
streets. Boos mingled with cheers
along the route, but reporters got
the impression that most of the
derisive shouts were directed at
Baltimore’s former mayor, How
ard W. Jackson, a democrat, who
has joined the Dewey ranks.
Later, during a brief stop at
York, Pa., however, Dewey him
self received as many boos as
cheers when he appeared on his
train platform.
Dewey appealed directly for
democratic support, declaring:
“This is not a contest between
democrats and republicans. It is
a contest between, on the one hand
those who believe in our system
of government—republicans and
democrats alike—and on the other,
those who have kidnaped the dem
ocratic party in order to change
our system of government.”
_v
TRUMAN APPEALS
FOR LABOR VOTE
PITTSBURGH, Nov. S.——
Winding up an 8,000-mile transcon
tinental tour with an appeal for la
bor’s vote in disputed Pennsylva
nia, Sen. Harry S. Truman declar
ed tonight that Congress Republi
cans had fought “nearly all” of the
Democrats’ “liberal reforms” and
“you are foolish, indeed, if you
believe that the leopard can change
his spots overnight.”
The Demecratic vice presiden
tial candidate asserted in a pre
pared radio address that “reac
tionaries opposed to any progress
ive movement and enemies of la
bor” are without exception, “hop
ing and praying that some how
they can defeat the president.”
The broadcast speech followed
an off the cuff address to a Dem
ocratic rally at Syria Mosque at
which the other speakers included
Orson Welles, the actor.
Truman declared that the “reac
tionaries” do not like some of the
things Gov. Dewey is saying on
the subject of labor “in his efforts
to get elected,” but “they do not
believe he means what he says.”
“Do not hope for a miracle,” he
said.
In his last campaign speech be
fore the election, except for his fi
nal appeal to Missouri voters fr6m
his home town of Independence,
Mo. Saturday night, Truman ex
pressed belief that Pittsburgh,
“like all other industrial communi
ties,” will go Democratic.
“Everyone expects this because
the working men know which par
ty they can rely upon to watch out
for the welfare of the working
man,” he said._
of St. Barb for limited new gains
toward Saales pass.
The U. S. Ninth Air force bomb
ed bridges across the Moselle on
both aides of Trier.
Queen Visits Wounded Yanks
8** ^-__—-JBlMidl
Farmacist T-Sgt. Robert L. Maxwell, Ayer, Mass., explains the
uses and preparation of penicillin to the dowager Queen Mary of Eng
land, during her visit to a general hospital, somewhere in England.
Official U. S. Army Signal Corps Radio-telephoto. (International).
BALFOUR DAY IS
CELEBRATED HERE
• Rabbi J. Gerson Tolocho, of
Temple Oheb Sholom, Goldsboro,
was the principle speaker at the
Balfour Day meeting, sponsored
by the Wilmington Zionist and Ha
dassah organization, last night at
8 o’clock in the Temple of Israel
lounge.
Reports were made by B. May
and Mrs. Ben Kingoff, respective
presidents of the two groups.
Rabbi Tolochko served in Miss
issippi for ten years prior to his
coming to Goldsboro. While there
he was Chaplin of the federal and
county prisons, Student Advisor at
the University of Mississippi, and
dean of the Mississippi Institute of
Jewish, and Cognate studies.
He visited Europe, Asia and Af
rica four times, visiting in Berlin
when world war II broke out.
While taking motion pictures of
burned synagogues and churches
he was arrested by the Gestapo
and witnessed the Nazi terror and
brutality at its worst
Ratbi Tolochko has written nu
merous text books, including one
on "Judaism” and one on "Com
parative Religion.” He is also the
author of Bar Mitzvah and con
firmation scrolls. At present he is
engaged in the compilation of an
exhaustive and comparative con
cordance to the Apocrypha.
The Hadassah ladies served as
hostesses during the social hour,
following the meeting, which was
opened to the public.
r..
Tide Water Offer To Cut
Plant Accounts Approved
(Continued from Page One)
trie plant account, $124,945 in the
electric plant acquisition adjust
ment. Retirements of $136,595 ni
the plant account reduced the ad
justment there to $1,667,240, ac
cording to Tide Water officials.
The order for elimination of the
the plant accounts comes as the
write - ups and other excesses in
climax to a long series to delays
since Tide Water first filed reclas
sification and original cost studies
with FPC on June 11, 1940.
On May 5, 1941, the company
advised the commission that a re
view cf its studies had revealed
inaccuracies that would require
the preparation and filing of re
vised studies. It was not until July
4, 1944, however, after numerous
extens of time for filing, thatons
extensions of time for filing, that
Tide Water put its revised studies
on record.
There followed further confer
ences between representatives of
the company and of the commis
sion, which resulted in a filing of
further revisions on October 24,
1944. It was on this filing that the
FPC order of today was based. In
addition to its customers in Wil
mington, residents in about 60
smaller communities in North Car
olina are served at retail by Tide
Water.
-V
Egg albumin is used in making
camera film, adhesives, paints,
fertilizers, paper sizing, and
printers’ ink.
....HhHr*
KESSELRING SAID
WOUNDED IN ITALY
BERN, SWITZERLAND, Nov. 2.
_UP)—Field Marshal Gen. Albert
Kesselring, German commander-in
chief in Italy, was reported tonight
to have been wounded in Italy dur
ing an attack similar to the one
that eventually cost Field Marshal
Erwin Rommel nis life in France.
Kesselring’s automobile, accord
ing to information from Italy, over
turned when it was machine gunned
by an Allied plane near Bologna.
The extent of his injuries is not
yet known here.
Kesselring, 58-year-old Bavarian
who was counted among the great
victors in the German conquests
of Poland, Belgium and France,
has had several narrow escapes in
the last year and a half.
Last July 25 the German news
agency DNB reported that he had
been wounded slightly during front
line operations in Italy.
Kesselring began his military ca
reer as a lieutenant in the 2nd‘foot
artillery regiment and was a cap
tain in the first World War. Sub
sequently becoming interested in
aviation he switched to the German
air force and by 1937 was made
a general of aviation.
In the Polish campaign in 1939
he was commander in chief of the
aii arm, and his bombing fleets
participated in the attacks on Lon
don and Coventry.
Kesselring next appeared in Italy
as German commander. He nar
rowly escaped death or injury
when Allied airmen leveled h i s
headquarters at Frascati, near
Rome.
_tr
U. S. FLIERS DOWN
208 NAZI PLANES
(Continued from Page One)
The pilots flew through the hea
viest flak they have encountered in
months—“it rattled like hail” on
the wings and fuselage, one pilot
—and met upwards of 500 Ger
man fighters, including many
green and black jet planes which,
fliers said, “climbed straight up
off the ground.
The Americans, apparently an
ticipatnig fierce opposition, sent
out the second largest fighter es
cort ever dispatched by tho Eighth
airforce to shepherd the 1,100 bom
bers to their targets. The Ger
mans, making a major attempt to
save the synthetic oil plant at
Mersebury, ordered up their big
gest force of interceptors against
the Americans over that sectofr
PBHERHRUQUID
PROMPTLY RELIEVES TORTURE
AND AIDS HEALING OF
SKIN RASHES
Here’s a Doctor’s formula—Zemo—a
stainless liquid which appears invisible
on skin—yet so highly medicated that
first applications relieve itching, burning
of simple skin rashes, eczema and similar
skin and scalp irritations due to external
cause. Won’t show on skin. Apply clean,
stainless Zemo any time. In 3 sizes.
At any drugstore. - ZEMO
I I
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\ t I I
I 1 1
ANNOUNCEMENT I
a ■
a i
a ■
a i
WE ARE HAPPY TO ANNOUNCE THAT WE ARE NOW
ARLE TO GIVE OUR CUSTOMERS
a ■
a ■
Pre-War Quality
DRY CLEANING
a ■
' a »
a >
a »
a i
Buttons and ornaments removed from ladies dresses and II
replaced after cleaning. Buttons replaced on men's suits 11
and cuffs tacked. Clothes cleaned in 100 per cent pure 11
distilled cleaning solvent. And, above all, your bundle is 11
carefully inspected as to quality and workmanship before I >
being bagged. 11
a t
1 I
v Dry Cleaning Accepted Up Until Saturday 10 A. M.
To Be Finished the Same Week
■ >
■ ■
CASH and CARRY or DELIVERY SERVICE j
Send Your Laundry Bundle Along
i i
MODERN LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS
a a
118 S. 17th Street ^ ^ j
a i
»I,,■ 11■ i.. — -iriiiin.iiiiiilL
COOLEY URGES
WORLD MARKET
(Continued from Page One)
calling for one or more demon
stration farms “of the family-sized
type’’ in every county, an exten
sion of food prices to all farm
commodities, and the sale of ar
my equipment directly to the far
mer or to farm groups.
It also went on record as favor
ing the continuation of the Agri
culture Adjustment Administration
and the expansion of activities car
ried on by the State Agriculture
department’s diary, seed, and sta
tistics divisions.
Resolutions were passed asking
---“7 ' «44
that a study of the cost nf
ducmg, distributing, ard7 { pta>
mg of cotton be made aPrH°Cess’
a program on the export thst
cotton to other countries 1 °n *
sented to American farmer Pte'
cotton committee’s request ’ Th*
search be carried out'on tb* r*
parative cost of cotton atl7 0rn
was adopted, as were otherray°n
cerned with new :lseE ,0"‘
and cotton's place i„ futl,' Co,t°a
national trade agreen ent's lnter>
■— -V
Salt beds covering ar
40 square miles have been'!3 o!
in Nova Scotia. n f°dr.d
More than 10U,OOo'c"hir3r
have hay fever, accord - 3°ar’s
survey. 6 ,10 a
----
Product of
OESTILERIA SERRALLES, INC.,
Ponce, Puerto Rico, U. S. A.
Q84 PROOF
RUM
SOLE U. Si DISTRIBUTORS. Sehieffelin & Co., NEW YORK CITY .‘IMPORTERS SINCE VH
Get Your Home Ready for
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Many Types and Sizes!
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OTHER FAMOUS MAKES!
Cold weather is just ahead!
And an efficient oil heater
will give you the warmth you
want in any room, on the
coldest winter days! Bring
your certificate to Tauh
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tion from a large variety,
_
YES! WE HAVE ANTIFREEZE!
AUTO HEATERS
Many Models! A Type To
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Get your car ready for cold
weather driving comfort with
one of these fine hot water
auto heaters.
• A Complete stock of Heater
Parts, Heater Hose, Switches
and Other Heater Needs!
LAY THEM AWAY FOR CHRISTMASl
Be wise! Make your selection of toys Wagons- Scooter*
now from Taubman’s large stocks and p„ii toys'
reserve them for Christmas. 111
REPAIR PARTS for ACTOS!
Water Pumps! I Fuel Pumps!
Generators! | Carburetors
PISTON RTVfCC
I
Fuel Pumps; * a
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