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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, December 20, 1944, FINAL EDITION, Image 10

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1944-12-20/ed-1/seq-10/

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SAL ENGINEERS
PRESENT CASE
WASHINGTON, Dec. 19. — W —
Seaboard Air I me Railway, threat
ened by a strike set for January
14, concluded its statement today
before a special mediation board
which also heard an assertion that
the strike was an attempt by one
union to “undermine” another.
Harold H. McLaughlin, attorney
for the Brotherhood of Locomo
tive Engineers, told the board that
a rival union, the Brotherhood
Locomotive Firemen and Engine
men. which colled the strike,
wanted “entire bargaining rights”
with Seaboard.
The strik-3, originally set lor
December 15, was postponed 30
days to allow a review of the con
troversy by a three-man board
named by President Roosevelt.
The firemen’s union, declared
McLaughlin, failed to use “all law
ful remedies hut chose to precipi
tate a strike in wartime.” G. W.
Laughlin, assistant grand chief of
the engineer-s’ union, declared the
controversy “has no business' be
fore a special board and “should
not have caused a strike vote.”
The firemen's union was still un
represented today, after submit
ting a written summary of its
grievances yesterday and attri
bute the absence of spokesmen to
expenses and "more productive
activities.”
_
WOMAN’S SLAYER
HELD CAREFUL IN
HANDLING CHILD
LANDSDOWNE. Pa., Dec. 19.—
(jp)_Detectives concluded tonight
that the slayer of pretty Mrs. Lor
etta Cleveland took extraordinary
precaution against harming her
two-year-old daughter.
The brunette, 32-year-old wife
of a Marine Corps staff sergeant
was found dead in her duplex
apartment yesterday. Her skull
was crushed, and a blood-stained
hammer lay nearby. Her throat
was slashed, and detectives later
found a bloody razor in the bath
room. Her head and shoulders
were stuffed into her kitchen stove
and gas seeped from the unlighted
burners.
Her daughter, Elva, lay semi
conscious in her crib in an adjoin
ing bedroom when the killing was
discovered yesterday, nearly 12
hours, medical examiners said, af
ter Mrs. Cleveland died. Chief of
County Detectives Fred Jack said
the slayer apparently entered the
bedroom and opened the window,
then left and closed the door,
assuring that the seeping gas would
not take the child’s life. She was
only partly overcome.
_v
Crop Improvement Group
To Sponsor Corn School
RALEIGH, Dec. 19. -4.JFh- The
North Carolina Crop Improvement
Association will sponsor a two
day training course for North
Carolina farmers in the growing of
hybrid corn, January 23-34, H was
announced today.
The state now has 17 certified
producers of hybrid corn seed,
while in 1944 there were 131 ap
prentice growers. The latter will
attend the school in preparation
for the second year’s work which,
if successfully completed, wil
make them certified growers.
Dr. R. L. Lewis, head of the De
partment of Agronomy at Ohie
State University, will attend the
school to give lectures anc
act in an advisory capacity.
-V
BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMP!
Cupful of Coin
. ...—WW8888tt»ag888SM^
Doris Peterson, Goes? Girl of infield, proudly e>-hibitsgorgeous
trophy which went to owner of winner of first running of 575.0UU
mile-and-a-quarter Hollywood Park Gold Cup in four years. Big
southern California number closed most spectacular all-out W
~~ Funds meeting since Pearl Harbor.
Wounded City Ur Metz
Nursed Back To Life
METZ. Dec. 19. —UP)— Nearly
a month after its liberation by
troops of Lt. Gen. Georye S. Pat
icn, Jr.’s Third Army, Metz today
was the picture of a sadly wound
ed city gradually being nursed
back to life
The nursing job is a tough as
signment but it is being tackled by
the Army's civil affairs division
under Maj. S. S. Bean, former
mayor of Woburn, Mass., colla
borating with re-established French
authorities.
The Germans left piles of gar
bage, wrecked buildings, and a lot
of German paper money, but for
tunately they were in such a hur
ry to get away they also left
large supplies of foodstuffs.
Tne latter has been a big help.
The detachment’s supply officer,
Capt. J. Kovac, Chicago, was able
to release for civilian needs a
quantity of the captured supplies
equal to three weeks ration for
100.000 persons. Inasmuch as the
present population of Metz is about
70.000 this meant the danger of
a drastic food shortage was staved
off—at least for the critical win
ter months— without drawing on
American relief supplies.
Under German occupation, Metz
fared better than the people of
interior France. The Nazis regard
ed Metz as a German city and
went to great pains to persuade
the people to like it. Their basic
meat ration was for example 900
grams (two pounds) weekly com
pared to 250 grams for the in
terior.
i A labor shortage hampers the
huge job of cleaning up the rub
ble and refuse. There are thou
sands of refugees jn Metz waiting
a chance to return to their homes
in the outlying villages and towns
but they are reluctant to accept
employment for fear it will delay
their return to their own communi
ies and the jobs they expect t«
find there.
Mussolini was reported dead
some time ago; now he's re
ported ill. What has happened
is enough to make him turn
over, but not come back to life.
SEE KAMER
« AND SEE BETTER
Eyes Examined
, Glasses Fitted
; DR. W. A. KAMER
i Optometrist
jj Bullnck Building
Chinese Above Mandalay
Encounter Few Japanese
SOUTHEAST ASIA COMMAND
HEADQUARTERS, Kandy, Ceylon,
Dec. 19. —(£■)— Two Chinese ar
mies seeking to establish the first
overland route to China since 1942,
now little more than 80 miles
apart, are encountering compara
tively light Japanese resistance in
their drive to join up along the
Chinese-Burmese border some 20
miles northeast of Mandalay.
Operating in the rugged strip
between the Irrawaddy and Sal
ween rivers, the two forces are
slashing toward the town of Namh
kam which is about 65 miles norTi
of Lashio, former important sta
tion of the old Eurma Road.
The Chinese force on the western
flank is moving in a southeasterly
direction from Bhamo, approxi
mately 30 road miles northwest
of Namhkam. The Army to the
east, driving toward Burma *rom
China, is attacking some 50 miles
northwest of Namhkam just a
few miles nor h of the border town
of Wanting.
When the two forces meet the
first land route to China since the
Japanese stormed into North Bur
ma in 1942 will be opened. How
ever, supply convoys may not roll
from India to China for several
months after the juncture because
the road, once usable by motor
trucks, now is in damaged condi
tion. __
Army Gasoline Hijacked
On The Streets Of Paris
PARIS, Dec. 4.—(Delayed)— UR—
Gasoline has been hijacked at the
point of a gun on Paris streets
as liquor was hijacked in the Unit
ed States during prohibition.
Pilfering of vitally needed Amer
ican Army supplies, particularly
rations and gasoline, reached such
proportions that it seriously men
aced military operations.
So battle-hardened Americans
who chased the Germans out of
France and fought them on their
own soil are taking a hand in a
new war well behind the present
front lines.
It is a war against pilfering of
supplies enroute from ports or
beaches to the battlelines and the
"shock troops’’ who are beginning
to win it are new Military Police
battalions composed largely of of
ficers and men who have recov
ered from wounds but are not fit
for heavy combat.
They are guarding supply trains
rolling hundreds of miles to the
front.
It. has been found that men who
themselves suffered shortages at
the front as the result of pilfering
now are the best watchdogs for
the supply trains. Every train de
parting from a beachhead or port
for the front now is "personally
1
conducted” by enough of these
MPs to frustrate the various de
vices used by pilferers.
Hardboiled, they are given cred
it for cutting thefts down to man
ageable proportions. Once these
thefts had reached a point where
black market operators got almost
a bigger share of some trainloads
than did the frontline troops.
-V
SON OF ERIN GRINS
Used Car Dealer ^ins Case
Against Plagarist
1 NEW YORK, Dec. 19.—W—1"The
Smiling Irishman” grinned tri
umphantly today as the Supreme
Court whittled down one by one
the number of jovial sons of E’rin
in the used car business.
Leland Holzer, “The Smiling
Irishman, Inc.,” was granted an
injunction restraining a rival used
car dealer from using the name
“The Happy Irishman,” in the
conduct of his business.
The Happy Irishman, John J.
McDonald, had contended indig
nantly that the smiling Irishman
^wasn’t Irish, but was overruled.
-1
DEWEY-SPONSORED
TRIAL DISMISSED
ALBANY, N Y., Dec. 19.—In
state Supreme Court Justice Wil
liam H. Murray, one of four jurists
under fire of Go /emor Dewey s
special prosecutor in an investiga
tion of Albany county crime, dis
missed today indictments voted
against 12 persons by the special
grand jury convened for the In
quiry- , .
Justice Murray held the indict
ments were ‘‘not found by a legal
ly formed grand jury.”
Legality of special Prosecu-oi
George P. Monaghan’s selectior
of the grand jury has been in al
most constant litigation since th(
investigation was ordered a yeal
ago by Governor Dewey.
Justice Murray, who with thre«
other justices, was accused in i
Monaghan affidavit of ‘‘intolerably
interference” with the crime inqui
ry, said in a memorandum: “Th<
grand jury, when finally chosen
was not one drawn by lot as re
quired by statute but a body o
persons acceptable to the prosecu
tor.”
ir_
New Argentine Plane
Factory Is Dedicated
BUENOS AIRES. Dec. 19. ~(/P)
—A factory for producing new
types of airplanes and gliders for
the recently re-organized Argen
tine air force, founded by a com
pany blacklisted by both the Bri
tish and U. S. governments, was
opened at special ceremonies to
day.
The company popularly known
as IMPA (Industrias Metalurgi
cas Plasticas Argentinas) was or
ganized by Fritz Mandl, onetime
Austrian munitions manufacture)
and former husband of screen Ac
tress Hedy Lamarr.
present at the ceremn*"**41 ',Vt
MPA plants pro&‘. Otl
armaments and plastics blCycl
PARIS PASXOR xo rkti
ToNDON. Dec ;9 ^
Very Rev. F W 'r. , 1- I
l7 y^rs dean of ft3”- :
Cathedra! of the Holy
Paris, will re .urn there ,Uy
to resume the pastoral*
June. 1940. after the faD
He returned to London I 51
from the United States
lectured under ausnirl 'hsrs
War Depar n ■ : v!CE5 ^ :
_buywarb<)vDsAN1)SIam
A REAL EXCUSE
Truck Driver Handling Dia
pers Wins Trial Delay
NEW YORK, Dec. 19.—(JP)—Irv
ing Weber, 41, won a postpone
ment of his traffic violation cas
today.
His employer told the judge tha
Weber drove a diaper deliver
truck and couldn’t be spared fror
his work.
CrS 666
Cold Preparations As Directed
Get Your New
FALL HAT
At
Gibson's Haberdashory
North Frant Street
I Shop Early—Maily Early
I ■ A small deposit holds any
i i gift 'til Christmas.
;; B. GURU, Jeweler
II 264 N. Front St.
i ' ...............
M44rTTf ♦♦♦^TTTTT
^■ " ' ~ ~
A DIRECT ■
REDUCTION LOAN I
with interest and principal reducing each month i. «. H
to home financing. Investigate our plan as we have k" El
funds to lend on acceptable security. ^R
NEED -A WAR BOND? — SEE ESI B
[ Three ^R
The / Million Dollar OR
Carolina Baildim and Lean ha I
“Member Federal Home Loan Bank” * B
W A. FONVIELLE. gec.-Treai. B
ROGER MOORE, Pres. W. D. JONES, Asst Sec tv- B
M. G. JAMES. V-Pres. J. 0 CARR., B
The MAP I
* and the I
MORTAR I
I
★ Into this mortar go medi- physician directs patients to V
cants from every corner of the bring his prescriptions hen 9
globe. Many rare and costly for careful compounding; H
items stock our prescription calls us for his office needs. 9
shelves. Our large volume per- Skilled service, plus the 9
mits us to keep them always highest ethical standards com. jX
at hand, fresh and potent. That bine to make this pharmacy fij
is one of the reasons your Prescription Headquarters, M
hi <111**19 PM
I ^9
90 PROOF
tf’anH'ybmuHitt
BLENDED WHISKEY
65* GRAIN NEUTRAL SPIRITS
THE FIEISCHMAHH DISTILUHG CORPORATIOH
dfee4MAi6t,cA£urfy<ytA,
NOTICE
1944 City and County taxes are past
due. Pay your personal property tax
now, and save garnishment of wages
starting Jan. 1st, 1945.
C. II. Morse
City & County Tax Collector.
_m———mmmmmm_________________——-——
YOUR OLD FAVORITE
EGGNOG
ICE (REAM
IS BACK TOR TRE
HOLIDAY ...
A wholesome mix of selected
ingredients frozen to a deli
cious goodness. On sale at all
White’s dealers.
I6 * a
Listen ?S
To 1
Baukhage
News J5E
Commentator ^
WMFD &
Mon.-Wed.-FrV jS
1P.M. W

%&&& \
EGGNOG j
In Quart Bottles i
t
★ j
Can be served as is orother flavors added. An ex- *
cellent treat for the hdidays. *71? ^
Quart. *
★ !
I Delivered to Regular Customers With Milk Order. 1 ||
White Ice Cream and Milk Company |
CONDENSED STATEMENT
December 1st, 1944
cJhe {Insured
Peoples Building & Loan Association
OF
WILMINGTON
ASSETS
First Amortized Mortgage Loans_ .$1,693,730.86
Loans on Shares of Association_____ 1,390.00
Cash on Hand and In Banks_ 115,240.05
Federal Home Loan Bank Stock_ 78,500.00
U. S. Government Bonds_ 811,200.00
Furniture and Fixtures-- 5,000.00
TOTAL__$2,645,060.91
LIABILITIES
Savings and Investments of Members-$2,405,782.69
Loans in Process ---
Paid in by Borrowers for Taxes, Net- 1,6b/ °°
Other Liabilities ---
Reserves and Undivided Profits _ LU.nw
TOTAL „. $2,645,060.31
J __ I
INSURED SAFETY
UNDER AN ACT OF CONGRESS, APPROVED JUNE 27, 19^
EACH MEMBER’S INVESTMENT IN THIS ASSOCIATION IS AU
TOMATICALLY AND PERMANENTLY INSURED AGAINST
LOSS UP TO $5,000.00 BY AN AGENCY OF THE UNITED STATUS
GOVERNMENT.
AFFILIATED MEMBERS
The Federal Home Loan Bank System and
The Federal Savings & Loan Insurance Corporation
I PEOPLES BUILDING & LOAN
^“S^^JASSOCIATIONjp™™5
OFFICERS
O. H. SHOEMAKER N. L. FOY WM. M. HILL LENA M
President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer Ass., o
DIRECTORS
N. L. FOY WOODUS KELLUM HARRY H. SOLOM°
J. M. GREGG LOUIS T. MOORE E. P. H. !lJ nCK
WM. M. HILL O. H. SHOEMAKER H. F. VVu-UKI1
ATTORNEYS
WOODUS KELLUM G. DUDLEY HUMPHREY W. B.
Established 1906 112 PrincessJ^j

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