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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, December 31, 1944, FINAL EDITION, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1944-12-31/ed-1/seq-5/

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Mo Letup In Production
Of War Materials Seen
ru»um «. UllAVLS
Editorial Director, Cambridge
Associates
More production miracles are ii
sight as the premature optimisn
born after St. Lo died in the Nazis
mid-December breakthrough on t.hi
franco-Belgian frontier.
This ill-founded optimism whicl
apparently influenced both military
and industiral planning from Au
gust to December brought no hal
in over-all production, which wai
maintained at the high level reach
ed in late 1943. It did cause cut
back of various war contracts an:
postwar problems became the ex
cessive concern of management
labor and the general public.
There is no lack of emphasis or
vi.-ar production now and munition:
output will in all likelihood not only
be sustained but increased until
the final and definite defeat of Ger
many. Furthermore, procurement
schedules for the materiel to con
quer Japan will be revised upward
5S a result of von Rundstedt’s test
of our invincibility on the Westerr
front.
It is not likely, however, if we
believe that Germany will be beat
en jn the summer of 1945, that any
year in the near future will sur
pass the past year in either pro
duction or national income.
National Income at Peak
National income for 1944 is plac
ed at $154 billions. Production was
almost two and one-third times the
prewar average. Sixty per cent oi
this production went to supply out
forces and the armies of our al
lies That percentage can be in
creased if need arises since expen
riiti.,- for f’nnsiimpr cfnnHc ic «cti.
mated at S96 billions for the year,
which is a record for this country
or any other.
The question of manpower resum
el dominant importance as the
year ended. With more than eleven
million men in the armed forces
the bottom of the barrel was scrap
ed to maintain military and civilian
production at the record level.
Employment Off
Hint of an early peace in Europe
sent many war workers in search
of jobs with peacetime futures and
thousands of women, lend-leased
from the kitchen, felt free to re
turn to their homes. Despite the
fact that production was kept at a
high level, here was a drop in em
ployment of one million during the
year, with natural effect on wage
payrolls.
While labor disputes rated black
headlines during 1944 a large per
centage of working time was not
lost through strikes. So long as the
emergency situation is recognized
as such, it is not probable that the
strike problem will grow more dif
ficult than it is now. The prospect
for postwar industrial peace is not
good, however, and even the de
feat of Germany alone might sig
nal an outbreak of unrest that
would be hard to control.
The Office of Price Administra
tion has exercised more effective
control over living than was first
throught possible. Although living
costs, derived from a national av
erage of “white market” prices
-• --— • »•* J *** AVXAJLVX V1JV.
degree. There seems to be no early
end to the cigarette shortage or tc
gasoline restrictions. Food supplies
will be ample, with month to month
changes in the availability of but
ter. pork and beef.
Postwar Problems Remain
Although intensive study of post
war problems were swept into
abeyance with the German succes
ses in the December offensive the
problems themselves remain.
Promising sixty million jobs in the
1944 campaign, the President took
on more than is really necessary.
Fifty million jobs would sustain out
peacetime economy at prosperity
levels and give us an annual na
tional income in the neighborhood
of $130 billions.
In terms of real income, based
on present prices and present per
sonal tax levies, a national income
of anything over $110 billions would
give us a better living standard
than any we have enjoyed. In view
of massed savings estimated in ex
cess of $100 billions and deferred
consumer needs of inetimable ex
tent, an annual income of $110 bil
lion or better seems a conserva
tive possibility in the early post
war years. After that is another
problem.
-V
An ostrich does not bury its
head in the sand because it is
afraid, but only to grub for
worms with its bill or to cover its
eggs when going away from them
for a short while. *
Russia Favors Greater Territorial
Dissection Of Germany Than Allies
By PHIL AULT
United Press Staff Correspondent
LONDON, Dec. 30.—(UP)— So
viet Russia, determined to guar
antee her frontiers against anothei
invasion from the west, was under
stood tonight to lavor a greater
territorial dissection of Germany
than do Britain and the United
States.
All three powers however, are
known to be agreed basically on
the folly of dismantling Germany
into a virtually machineless agri
cultural nation.
The impending establishment oi
a Russian-sponsored provisional
Hungarian government in Buda
pest, once the city falls, is focus
ing the foreign-policy spotlight
once again on the prime Soviet
aim of self security.
In the light of her actions of the
last two years, the Soviet Union
appears to have two major objec
tives in dealing with the rest of
the world—Allied and Axis alike:
(1) Positive security of her wes
tern frontiers to enable Dostwar
reconstruction and improvement of
the homeland, and (2) the formu
lation of a world security organiza
tion in which she can cooperate
with Britain, the United States and
France to keep peace and subju
gate Germany.
Almost every major step Russia
has taken in an international
sphere can be viewed in the light
of those two objectives. The Rus
sian methods to achieve self-se
curity sometimes dovetail with the
aims of the United States and
Britain, but frequently they cause
uneasiness because of the sweep
ing nature of the proposals.
It is quite apparent that the So
viet has not achieved all of its
specific objectives in eastern Eu
rope, but it 1s moving toward them
steadily.
For Russia, the No. 1 postwar
aim is to break Germany’s ability
to make war. To achieve this aim,
her ambassador to London is sit
ting on the European advisory
commission With American, Bri
tish and French representatives.
In eastern Furope, Russia wants
and gradually is getting, a chain
of cooperative neighboring smaller
nations to buttress her western
approaches. It is this natural
sphere of influence which she is
seeking to solidify, sometimes by
conciliatory methods and some
times by stronger means.
SUPPORT OF LIMITS
EXTENSION EXPECTED
(Continued from Page One)
or her. At the bottom of each ques
tionnaire space was left available
for the individual to write in other
problems which need studying for
the improvement of Wilmington.
Item of third most importance
to the majority of the 130 persons
filling in questionnaires was the
one dealing with a post-war shelf
of public works. This was followed
closely by sentiment for a broad
redevolopment and slum clearance
program and an awareness for the
need of a complete zoning ordi
nance. These last three items re
ceived 45,44, and 43 votes respec
tively in either first, second, or
third places.
Sixth place of importance was
marked as the need for develop
ment of park and recreation fa
cilities; seventh, improvement of
facilities for automobile traffic for
greater safety and fewer delays;
and eighth, layin? of street lines
and zoning one mile beyond city
limits to control future growth.
In addition to the order in which
the items on the questionnaires
were classified, numerous sugges
tions were added at the bottom.
The need for municipal port facil
ites was mentioned by 12 persons;
a junior college was suggested by
eight persons; and a municipal air
port proposed by six others.
Still further planning suggestions
included tuberculosis sanitarium,
incinerator, abattoir, development
of a state park on the river front,
provision for better museum facil
ket, improved relations with our
trade areas, and thorough develop
ment of resort possibilities in co
operation with Wrightsville and
Carolina Beaches.
Although the questionnaire dealt
primarily with physical planning
for the city, numerous persons em
phasized the importance of indus
trial development as well by writ
ing suggestions for advancement
along this line.
It was explained that the Plan
ning board is making arrange
ments for industrial planning in ad
dition to physical development,
which would complete the indus
trial and economic survey of the
community looking toward the de
velopment of new manufacturing
plants and expansion of existing
Hies.
In connection with the desire for
x broad zoning ordinance to estab
lish well-defined areas of the city
ior residential use only, for com
mercial and industrial uses, it was
pointed out that the Planning board
Pas been authorized by the City
Council only to prepare such a
law.
» The city now has two “spot’ zon
ing ordinances. One provides for'
residentail use only in t h e area
bounded by Market, Castle, Fifth
and Third streets. The other pro
hibits extablisifmei^ of filling sta
tions in the section from Thirtenth
to Twentieth, between Rankin and
Market, and also within the area
bounded by Fourth, Tenth, Chest
nut and Orange.
Among the groups, to which the
Planning board presented ques
ionnaires, were Junior and Senior
5orosis, Lions, Civitans, Exchange,
Rotary, and Junior Chamber of
Commerce.
In the north, the Russians made
a stern peace with Finland that
weakened the Finns physically and
economically but left their sover
eignty intact. Now Finland is un
likely to be an rvenue for another
attack on the Soviet Union.
In the Baltic states, Russia ap
parently has her own way and will
incorporate tne three former re
publics—Estonia, Latvia and Lith
uania—into the Soviet Union.
Soviet diplomats in Poland have
encountered tneir toughest pro
blem. The Russian government has
affirmed that it wants an inde
pendent and friendly Poland It
does not want the present Polish
exile government in London to re
turn to Poland.
1944 DISAPPOINTING
YEAR TO OFFICIALS
(Continued from Page One)
Matching the too-cheerful view
of military progress has been pop
ular belief fostered by cheery of
ficial statements that politically
the great Allied powers were in
accord on most or all great issues.
In fact, little accord has been ob
tained. Hence recurrent outbursts
of mutual criticisms and suspicions
among the United States, Britain
and Russia.
The chief antidotes to disappoint
ments, military and political, were
the successful invasion of Europe
—which was a greater gamble than
military spokesmen ever admitted
except privately; the almost com
plete destruction of German naval
power, which made this possible;
the Allied triumph in the air battle
of Europe; the Russian advance
to Warsaw and the Allied victory
in France; the unexpectedly fast
progress in the Pacific, culminat
ing in the invasion of the Philip
pines; partial completion of the
Dumbarton Oaks plan for world
organization.
Admittedly Washington and Al
lied leadership have much to be
proud of, but in a year that had
been hailed as the year of victory,
it can count many times of dis’ap
pointment.
At the year’s end these points
stand out in the Allied picture:
1. In Germany- military power
uoo k/vvu uiiu&i y utucui
2. No one in authority here sees
any chance for any peace short of
unconditional German surrender
nor any lack of Allied unity against
the enemy, but for months it has
become increasingly evident that
the Allies are pulling apart on
postwar objectives.
3. In this connection the approach
of Russian forces to Austria is be
ing watched closely for indications
that it may provide an example of
new Allied unity on military opera
tions in an area where political
stakes also are high.
4. London intervention against
Count Sforza in Italy and in behalf
of King George and the Papandreou
government in Greece brought a
direct clash with Washington over
American insistence that the liber
ated peoples of Europe should be
allowed to set up their own govern
ments—even though that means ex
treme Leftist or Communists re
gimes in some cases.
5. Russia’s close-mouted hand
ling of Balkans affairs, the evi
dent reluctance of Red army lead
ers to allow Anglo-American ob
servers free movement, raised new
apprehensions about division of
Europe into spheres of influence.
6. Diplomats here spoke of Rus
sia’s primary interest in Eastern
Europe, Britain’s primary concern
in western and southern Europe.
The French leader, General Charles
De Gaulle, jockeyed for a middle
position by making an alliance with
Stalin and preparing another with I
Churchill.
7. The fate of the Polish govern
ment in exile appeared sealed and
Russia was expected momentarily
to recognize the Lublin Committee
Polish Liberation, which Russia
sponsored, as the provisional gov
ernment of Poland. Britain and
the United States had completely
lost patience with the Polish gov
ernment at London for not getting
together with Russia, but feared
that elevation of the committee to
full power would merely store up
future trouble.
Did “Diamond Jim” Have
Stomach or Ulcer Pains?
It is hardly likely that Diamond Jim
Brady could have eaten so voraciously tf
he suffered after-eating pains. Sufferer*
who have to pay the penalty of stomach
or ulcer pains, indigestion, gas paln^
heartburn, burning sensation, bloat ana
other conditions caused by excess acid
should try Udga. Get a 25c box of Udg*
Tablets from your druggist. Firs. aos«
must convisce or return box to us *nn
get DOUBLE YOUR MONEY BACK.
Saunders Drug store and drug store*
everywhere. ___
have increased 27 per cent since
the beginning of the war, this in
crease is less than half the rise
1 that occurred during a similar pe
i riod in World War 1. It should not
be forgotten, either, how much
1 more money is now available to
float an inflationary price rise.
1 Prices Rising
Price increases in such import
ant categories as clothing and rents
; are reflected in, the indexes for the
last half of 1944. Further gradual
increases in these and other prices
can be expected. On the debit side
is the rather firm prospect that
Congress, urged by consumers and
many spokesmen for industry, will
insist on control for prices in the
early postwar period when the sit
uation might be most likely to get
out of hand.
Farmers and manufacturing
workers continue to garner a big
ger than normal share of the in
creased national income. Cash
farm income for the year is placed
at $19.5 billions. The physical vol
ume produced was the second lar
gest of any year and about 6 per
cent above the 1944 yield.
Farmers Savings High
While there has been a recent
increase in the prices of farm
lands, there does appear to be tne
over-extension of indebtedness that
was catastrophic after World War
1. War bond purchases by farmers
are much higher than the national
average and the other forms of
savings show proportinate in
crease.
Shortages of goods for civilian
consumption are likely to persist
altVimicrVi will l •_a_a
| FOR SALE!
RESTAURANT
Established 20 Years
Or will sell half interest to responsible party who would help
run business.
Write Box 1091
Wilmington, N. C.
Announcing I
PALACE MARKET NO. 2 I
WINTER PARK I
(formerly Borhenhagen’s Grocery) |
This Store Has Been Purchased By Me I
and Will Be Under The Attention of 11
T.
MR. CHARLES CLARK, Mgr. — Grocery Department ft
MR. CHARLES HOLLAND, Mgr. — Meat Department ft
STAPLE & FANCY GROCERIES-MEATS-POULTRY I
ft
Palace Market No. 1,10th and Princess 1
Grocery Manager — MR. AUBREY PRINCE ft'
Meat Dept. Mgr. — MR. A. J. HUFHAM ft
• • • • ft
As owner of these two stores I invite food shoppers to avail them- jft
selves of our facilities and courteous management. Also to note ft
above change of ownership announcement. P. L. WEBB. S;
ftnftftftBftMIHftft^ftii^ftft^ftB1
(BUSINESS TRENDS!
TRADE. INDUSTRY AND FINANCE —1943-1944
= i’oo INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY
2 so ^
J30 • -
-—i—i—i—i—1—i—i_i- i ■! t
JFMAMJJASONQ
=’4o EMPLOYMENT I.L*.'
IPf .
>70 ■ —_
^_
—1-1.i i i—L i i i i i t
_ |j^mamjjasqnd

oMfY DOLLAR VOLUME
50 lukliHU .
:::
35 ■ \y
-l-* i—i—i—i—i—iii'i
JFMAMJJA50ND
“ COST OF LIVING ».Ll.
n8
->—i—i ...
J^MAMJJASOND
IVd RETAIL sales
*65 : \. /
160 / -
-1—1—I1 *»*' 11I1 1 j »
J FMAMJJA30ND
Tf CASH FARM INCOME
*2.200 • /
*2.000 ■
’itDO ■ ./■ \_
*1.600 ■ . // '
*1.400 . —-y
>1.200 S'»05-’ *
*1.000
-1—L_J—I—IIl_ I l I I .
JPMAMJJA30M D
^ COMMODITY PRICES I.L.S.
1015 ■
IOJ.0 ■ '.v V _
ioj.5. y ** ,*'v/
I0JO • /
>01.5 ■
-1—1—J—I—1—1_I_t ' i i i
JFMAMJJAJOND
ooosl CARLOADINGS
900- »*wu' *Mkl’}^K
850 / j \
800 \
750 .
-—tLi—i—i_l_j_i_i_i_i i i ;
JFMAMJJASOND
[Jr™! STEEL ingot output
7800 - * DOO Oafttad A
7600 . /\ *
7400 • a // v 'a /r\ A\
7200 ■ vV \/ ' ^
7.000 - \ / V
-1—i_i—i—i—iii i i i i
JPMAMJJA S 0 N D
I CRUDE OIL OUTPUT
iooo ■ mfMi My
4000 ■ q*l—
-—I—I—I—I_L_l_i ■ ■ i ■ ■
JFMAMJJASONO
■ I' - I ■ I
K*N ELECTRIC POWER OUTPUT
mri|t wMkiy
4iOt*lr
I JFmamjja scTn d
J=s.ooI NEW CONSTRUCTION
s6?: \/Ar^ \
50 • s><y V.
-1 i i i '' i ■ ■ i ■ i
_ JFMAMJJASOND
Extra Special!
TONIGHT-NEW YEARS EVE
DINE
and
DANCE
TO THE MUSIC OF
:l
DON'T MISS THIS
I BIG NEW YEARS' EVE
DAXCIE
No Admission Charge—No Cover Charge
Minimum Charge .... $1.50 Per Person
DIAL 9136 FOB RESERVATIONS
AT OUR GRILL
Broiled U. S. Choice Sirloin Sieahs
Fried Golden Spring Chicken
I r ’ -v.
GUY BULLARD
' *
and His
FAMOUS CLUB ORCHESTRA
Will Play Here Every
Wednesday, Friday and Saturday
FAMOUS CLUB AND GRILL
I Carolina Beach Road Just Past Greenfield Park — Dial 9136
GUY BULLARD
And His
Famous Club Orchestra
TONIGHT
k — 9 lo 2 —
n||v Make Reservations Now!
so°o FAILURES
400 ■
300 • \
200 ■ ",
J00 SV****'H*
-1—1-' III.
__ JrM AwJ JASO»0
Cambridge associates — Boston
*. I
STOCKS
iso (Dow-Jonts MuilrislAwrsjJt)
us . *—'o-fer \— \ .
ISO . A& \/
ia ✓
-1-1 i i i i i i i i i i
JFHA MJJASOND
ATTENTION SHRINERS!
ALL SHRINERS and their Ladies are invited to attend
the ARAB SHRINE CLUBS NEW YEARS PARTY,
Plantation Club night, January 1st, 1945.
From Eight TIL. Course dinner, Floor show, Dancing.
Fun for all, don’t miss it.
Tickets on sale WADE REALTY CO., KINGOFF’S,
JEWEL BOX, FUTRELLES.

N The Personnel of this organization
WISHES
\ FCR YOU
| A
I NEW YEAR
OF
• HEALTH, HAPPINESS
AND VICTORY
B. F. Goodrich Stores
! V. L. BROWN, Manager
14. N. Third St.

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