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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, May 25, 1945, Image 9

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I The Sports Trail
I By WHITNEY MARTIN
>Eloper thought he was jump
Wcrt height, salary height, when
in? for "d the Cardinals last week.,
fc« pTno idea he was jumping
H« h,ad “ce, but that’s the way
,or d'pri out as he jumped all tlje
it :iir.n st Louis to Boston and
vay , world championship dub ft
!ro!"th-place team.
* 5 , bjg pitcher’s salary dispute
T owner Sam Breadon unques
»'llh °,. was the motivating fac
“°n he surprising deal, and Coop-,
lor 'hnuld have known better than
f needle the Card boss if he want
° ,n stay with the dub.
ed ° don has been known t<y dis
f stars without any proyoca-;
riept money, which it?ad
In ted is quite ' provocative! at
cuch fellows as Johnny
voe" and -Joe Medwick and Curt
navis and Mickey Owen were sold
D ' ded while still speaking to
R r e a d on personally, and, not
•SK.tTW
strss?«ssr»£r£
r;H Lohrman, Ken O’Dea and cash,
?■, a wide field of speculation.
P,Vas Breadon convinced^ that
vin'-tLwho won more than games
p4’of his last three year*. would
a;be so successful withikfr Broth
er walker to catch him?
Have the Cards already given up
on their chance of repeating as.
champions again, . and 'figure
Mod's presence or absence iyould
make no difference?
' will Brother Walker ( who joined"
jiort in the demand for more
money, meet the same fate as the
pitcher when Walker returns from
the service? __
Jt&e toe Braves, with plenty o'
money behind them now, out to buy
a pennant much as Larry MacPhail
bought one for Brooklyn*
conlTh?^ thI latter’ the Braves
nould be the dark horse of the
league, if Cooper comes through
the way he did for the Cards last
year. The club spent about $250,000
for new talent last winter, picking
up 12 or 14 star minor leaguers a
guns1* 01 Wh°m areX going *r®at
l Ot course it’s all an “if” pr0po
P1.*10?’ but lf Jim Tobin regains
his last years form, A1 Javery’s
arm heals, Nate Andrews continues
Ais, steady pitching, and Cooper is
fm form, the Braves will have four
first-class starting moundsmen.
bo far the hitting and fielding has
been adequate. Tommy Holmes has
been leading the league, Butch
Nieman has improved, Carden Gil
-enwater, acquired from the Dod
gers via St. Paul, is playing good
ball, and Dick Culler, another off
season purchase, looks very well
at shortstop.
Ordinarily, in the past, when the
Cardinals disposed of an outstand
ings player they had some player
in their organization ripe to re
place the departing star. Were
these normal times they would
nave so many capable pitchers on
call that even the loss of a man
like Cooper would not be too great
.a handicap.
But most of those good pitchers
are in the service, and that, com
bined with an epidemic of sore
arms, has left Billy Southworth
with a headache, so there must
have been extenuating services in
Cooper’s departure. Maybe $75,000
worth of them.
Giants Rally In Fifth,
Defeat^ Cincinnati, 7-6
CINCINNATI, May 24—UP)—Pinch Hitter Danny Gardella’s home
run with Buddy Kerr on base in the eighth inning enabled the New York
Giants to grab their second straight decision over Cincinnati today
by a 7-6 margin.
Bill Voiselle, who had won eight in a row but never had topped
the Reds, failed again when he was knocked out of the box in the
1 r A nn A A « +1a» (a/tA _ * . _
fcCLUIiU uuiuw, - ~-—-> --
oiid of three relief hurlers, receiv
ed credit for the victory over the
Veteran Hod Lisenbee.
Phil Weintraub’s eighth round
tripper opened a five-run Giant
second inning after Cincy had pick
ed up two in the first. The Reds
added one in the second off Voiselle
and tied it up in the fifth on singles
by Dain Clay and Eric Tipton, a
double by Gee Walker and a foul
out by Frank McCormick.
Three walks in the seventh
doomed Reliefer Bill Emmerich
who replaced Voiselle and Adams
passed Walt Flager forcing in the
tie-breaking score.
hew York AbllO A E
Rucker, cf _ 5 110 0 0
Huusmann, 2b. 4 1 1 1 0 0
Ott, rf_IIIIIIII 4 0 1 • 0 0
Med wick, If_” 5 0 1 3 0 0
Weantriub, lb~2IZIZZZZ * 1 2 12 0 0
Lombardi, c ._ 3 1 0 3 0 0
Kerr, ss ..IZZZZZZZ I 3 1 ;1 1 4 0
Reyes, 3b.. 4 1113 0
Voiselle, p _~ZZZZZZZ 0 0 0 0 0 0
Emmerich, p' ZZZZZZZI 10 10 10
Adams, p_II.ZZZZZ 0 0 0 0 1 0
xGardella, ”p 1110 0 0
Hansen, p_0 0 0 0 1 0
Totals __ 35 7 10 27 10 0
xBatted for Adams in eighth.
Cincinnati Ab R H O A E
Williams, 2b _t___ 410120
c'_- 4 2 3 3 1 0
«er. rf _ 4 2 2 5 0 0
McCormick, lb 5 0 1 9 0 0
Mesner, 3b 4 0 10 10
Tipton, If _ - 4 0 2 2 0 0
flaeer' ss __ 3 1 0 2 0 1
Laneman, c_ 4 0 1 5 0 0
{***• p --_: o o o o o o
Unenbee, p_ 300010
„'Pek -. iooooo
Beck'p_1—r-- 0 0 0 c o
T“lals _ 36 6 10 27 5 l
xBatted for Lisenbee in eighth.
s>CGre by innings:
hew York __ _ _ _ - ■ 050 000 020—7
Cincinnati _ __ 210 020 100—6
t,,E™s £atted in—Ott 3, Weintraub,
ui 3 Gardella 2, Clay. McCormick.
n"erJ' Tipton, Flager. Two base hits
Weintraub. Walker. Home runs—
weintraub. Gardella. Stolen base—Walk
blf ^'r'fldes~Voise]le. Emmeries. Joou
V •Kerr and Weintraub. Left on
tn York 7- Cincinnati 10. Bases
... a,,a Voiselle 3. Emmerich 2. Strike
Kin n't,1 V C 2’ Emmerich ■ 3, Hansen,
j ! °H Voiselle 5 in 1 2-3; Emmerich
Off ni Adams 0 ln 1_3: Hansen 2 in 2.
fjte 4 m 12-3, Lisenbee J in 6
losirfL' i" '■'V'nning pitcher—Adams,
line Sr?ltcher-;Llsenbee. Umpires—Hen
fenc. 1 ™ ’ Siars- Time—2:17. Atten
e 1.033 paid, 516 wonjen.
irehiaf Crater in Arizona is" a
v historic eruption dating to 885
&[/Tm TKY\
1mm
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
American .League
New York.6*ifC&iclg& 3*-4 '
Boston 8, St. Louis 6.
Philadelphia 7, Detroit 2.
Cleveland 1, Washington 0.
National League
Philadelphia 6, Chicago 3.
New York 7, Cincinnati 6.
Pittsburgh 10, Boston 9.
St. Louis 7, Brooklyn 5.
STANDINGS
American League
Teams Won Lost Pet.
Chicago _ 15 9 .625
New York- 16 11 .593
Detroit_— 14 10 .583
St. Louis _ 13 11 .542
Washington— _ 12 15 .430
Boston _— 11 15 .423
Cleveland _ 10 15 .400
Philadelphia — 11 17 .393
National League
Teams Won Lost Pet.
New York_— 23 7 .767
Brooklyn _— 17 12 .586
St. Louis, 1- 16 13 .552
Pittsburgh_ 14 14 .500
Chicago _—— - ; 13 14 .481
Boston*-- 11 15 .423
Cincinnati _ 10 15 .400
Philadelphia_ 8 22 .267
x—Played night game.
PROBABLE PITCHERS
NEW YORK, May 24—<£*)—Prob
able pitcher for tomorrow’s major
league games. (Won and lost rec
ords in parenthesis):
American League
Chicago at New York—Hum
phries (1-0) vs Gettel (1-2X.
St. Louis at Boston—Potter (3
2) vs Wilson (1-4).
Detroit at Philadelphia—(night)
—Overmire (1-1) vs Newsom (1-3).
Cleveland at Washington—(night)
—Bagby (0-5) vs Haefner (1-4).
National League
New York at Cincinnati—Feld
man (4-1) vs Heusser (3-2).
Brooklyn at St. Louis—(night)—
Davis (4-2) vs Wilks (2-3).
Philadelphia at Chicago—Wyatt
(0-2) vs Wyse (4-3).
Boston at Pittsburgh—Tobin (2
5) vs Roe (3-2).
-V
BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS
SOX STAGE RALLY,
WHIP BROWNS, 8-2
Pitcher Jack Kramer Sent
To Showers By Five Run
Uprising In Sixth
BOSTON, May 24.— (/P>—1The Bos
ton Red Sox forced Pitcher Jack
Kramer to the showers today dur
ing their five-run sixth inning as
they beat the St. Louis Browns, 8
to 6.
Ten of the Sox came to bat in
the big sixth and Ben Steiner,
who got four hits in five times at
bat, brought in the first two runs
with a homer after Leon Culber
son singled.
Jack Tobin reached first on an
error by Boris Martin and after
Bob Johnson singled and Pete Fox
walked, filling the bases, Jack
Miller took over the St. Louis
pitching assignment for Kramer.
George Metkovich singled, bring
ing in the third and fourth runs,
and Skeeter Newsome’s single
brought in the fifth tally of the
inning.
The Red Sox’ Pinky Woods, won
his second game of the season, but
was knocked out in the seventh
as the Browns collected three runs.
With two out and Mike Kreevich
on, Stephens singled and Martin
tripled, bringing in two runs. The
third came in on Gene Moore’s
single.
St. Louis Ab R H O A E
Gray, If 4 1 0 2 0 0
Schulte, 3b I___ I 5 2 3 1 3 1
Kreevich, cf _ 4 0 1 3 0 C
Stephens, ss "411240
Martin, lb_ZZZIIIZZ 4 1 2 8 0 1
Moore, rf_ ~~~ 2 0 1 2 0 0
Hayworth, " 2 3 0 0 5 0 0
xByrnes _11111111 2 0 0 0 0 0
Mancuso, c ~ 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gutteridge, 4 0 0 1 0 0
Kramer, p _””_ 2 110 10
Miller, p 0 0 0 0 0 0
xxHollingsworth . 1 0 0 0 0 0
West, p _0 0 0 0 1 0
Totals _ 34 6 9 24 9 2
xBatted for Hayworth in 7th.
xxBatted for Miller in 8th.
Boston Ab R H O A E
Culberson, cf 4 2 2 2 0 0
Steiner, 2b "" 5 3 4 4 2 0
Tobin, 3b I 2 1 0 0 2 1
Johnson, If 5 1 2 3 0 0
Fox, rf_:::::::::: 412100
Metkovich, lb_ 5 0 2 8 1 0
Newsome, ss _ 5 0 1 2 2 0
Garbark, c 4 0 0 7 1 0
Woods, p _ 4 0 1 0 0 0
Ryba, p __ 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals _ 38 8 14 27 8 1
Score by innings:
St. Louis A 200 010 300—6
Boston ___"“ 101 015 OOx—8
Runsbatted in—Martin 4, Kreevich.
Moore, Fox, Culberson, Johnson. Steiner
2, Metkovich '.2‘fi Newsome. Two base
hits—Kramei, Woods. Three base hits—
Martin. Home runs—Culberson, Steiner.
Sacrifices—Kreevich, Tobin 2. Double
plays—Tobin, Steiner and Metkovich.
Left on bases—St. Louis 7, Boston 12.
Bases on balls—Kramer 3,Miller 1, Woods
5. Strikeouts—Kramer 5, Woods 4, Ryba
3. Hits—off Kramer 10 in 5 3-4 innings;
Miller 3 in 1 1-3; West 1 in 1; Woods 9
in 6 3-4; Ryba in 2 1-33. Winning pitch
er—Woods. Losing pitcher—Kramer. Um
pires—Rue, Boyer, Summers. Time 2:10.
Attendance—3.241.
_V
DOW, FLYERS WIN
IN SOFTBALL LOOP
It took Ethyl Dow’s underhand
ers 11 innings to edge out the
POWG’s 7-6. in the first game of
last night’s Municipal Softball.
In the nightcap, John Koczan twirl
ed three hit ball for the Bluethen
thal Air Base, enabling them to
collect their fifth straight victory,
at the hands of the Medics, 6-4.
Koczan pitched no-hit. three up
and three down ball until the sixth
frame when Bernoskey singled,
only to die on first.
The Medics saved themselves
from being shutout in the last of
the seventh when they combined a
single, a double, two walks, and
one Flyer error to account for
four tallies.
In the first game, the Dowmen
tied the game up in the seventh
frame by rallying to score three
runs.
The game proved to be a pitch
er’s duel for four innings between
Slugger Brown of the Chemists,
and Merassa of the Guards, who
replaced Young in the seventh.
The Dowmen broke the game up
in the last of the 11th when Speedy
Morris singled, stole second, and
scored on Horton’s double.'
Play will be resumed tonight at
7:30 when the league leading City
Opticals clash with the Steam En
gineers, and the Army Crash Boats
tangle with the Bluethenthal Raid
ers at 8:30.
-y
Navy Mine Sweeper
Is Reported Sunk
WASHINGTON, May 24.—(U.R)—
The Navy announced today that
the mine sweeper YMS-481 was
sunk in the Philippines with mod
erate personnel casualties.
Next of kin have been notified.
The vessel, commissioned a year
ago and skeppered by Lt. tjg) Ther
on O. Anglin of Wadley, Ga., car
ried a normal complement of 30
men. Anglin was listed as wound
ed in action.
The ship was the 309th U. S.
Naval vessel lost from all causes
in this war.
Tornadoes have been reported
from every state in the United
States except Nevada.
St. John’s Tavern
114 Orange Et.
Dial 8-8085
DELICIOUS FOOD
Chicken In The
Rough — Friday
, -T
1
SOTH MANAGERS
PROTEST GAME
Detroit Mound Ace’s Ley
Is Broken By Liner Off
Estalella’s Bat
PHILADELPHIA, May 24. —(If)
—Pitcher A1 Benton, shut-out aca
of the Detroit Tigers, suffered a
oroken right leg today as the Phil
adelphia Athletics defeated tha
Detroit Tigers, 7-2, in a game which
was protested by both managers.
Benton was hit by a line-drive
off the bat of Bobby Estalella and
was carried from the field in tha
fourth inning. Dr. James E. Pugh,
Athletics’ club physician, said tha
five-game winner suffered a frac
tured small bone above the right
ankle.
Protests resulted from a mixup
which developed in the second in
ning when George Kell and Irv
Hall exchanged positions in tha
Athletics’ batting order. After de
claring Kell out because of tha
error, Umpire Eddie Rommel in
structed Kell to lead off in tha
third.
Since Kell was sixth in the cor
rect batting order, this meant there
were only five putouts in the first
two innings. Connie Mack and Steve
O’Neill both entered protests.
Two walks, two singles and a
two-base wild throw by Skeeter
Webb gave the Athletics four runs
and the ball game in the fifth in
ning, with Les Mueller pitching in
Benton’s place. Roy Cullenbine hit
a homer for the Tigers.
Detroit AbllO A E
Maier, 3b _ *11110
Mayo, 2b _”"”I *01210
Cullenbine, rf *11100
York, lb _IIIIIIII 3 0 16 10
Cramer, cf * 0 1 2 0 0
Outlaw, If * 0 1 2 0 0
Webb, ss301331
xWalker ’ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Swift, c 2 0 1*20
Richards, c _10 0 10 0
Bentop, p IIIIIIII.I 2 0 0 1 0 0
Mueller, p I 0 0 0 0 0 0
Houtteman, p IIHIIH 1 0 0 0 1 0
Totals ._. 33 2 8 24 9 l
xBatted for Webb in 9th. '
Philadelphia Ab R H O A E
Wilkins, ss _ 3 12 14 0
Rosenthal, If 4 110 0 0
Estalella. of 4 1 2 3 0 0
Bums, rf 4 1 2 0 0 0
Hall, 2b . 3 0 0 0 4 0
Kell, 3b 5 0 1 3 4 0
Siebert, lb ' 4 1 2 16 3 0
Hayes, c ..HHIHHI 3 1110 0
Christopher, p_I.Ill 3 1 0 3 5 0
Totals . 33 7 11 27 20 0
Score by innings:
Detroit ... . 101 000 000—2
Philadelphia ....Jir.Y.l 001 040 02x—7
Runs batted in—Hayes, Rosenthal, Cul
lenbine, Estalella, Mayo, York, Kell, Sie
bert. Two base hits—Siebert, 1 Webb.
Three base hit—Maier. Home run—Cui
lenbine. Sacrifice—Hall. Double plays—
Kell to Siebert, Christopher, Wilkins and
Siebert. Left on bases—Detroit 6, Phila
delphia 6. Bases on balls—oft Christoph
er 2. Mueller 2. Houtteman 1. Struck out
Benton 3, Mueller 1, Houtteman 1. Hits '
off—Benton Sin 3 1-3 innings: Mueller
1 in 1 Inning Houtteman 5 in 3 2-3
Innings. Wild pitch—Benton. Losing
pitcher—Mueller. Umpires-—Rommel Pip
gras and Grieve. Time—2:10. Attendance
—2,732.
Madison Square’s Boxers
Slated To Battle Tonight
NEW YORK, May 24.—(U.R)—Box
ing returns to Madison Square
Garden tomorrow night after near
ly two months’ absence, during
which the punch emporium was oc
cupied by a circus.
To lift the curtain upon what
Mike Jacobs hopes will be a busy
season, he has matched two rough
house Brooklyn brawlers in the
ten-round main event. The princi
pals are A1 (Bummy) Davis and
Rocky Graziano. each of whom has
about as much science as a Congo
gorilla.
However, since both are good
punchers and a knockout is ex
pected, a crowd of 16,000 and a
gate of $85,000 are anticipated.
-V
BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS
Benton Injured As A’s Nip Tigers, 7-2
Jimmy Deaton of Wilmington is shown displaying the seven and
one-half pound black bass which he hooked into Wednesday night at
Salmon’s Lake, formerly the Old Rock Quarry, located on Burnt Mill
Creek.
Mask-Wearing Banned
By Bocal Commission
Masked wrestling was prohibited by the Wilmington Boxing and
Wrestling Commission during a meeting yesterday afternoon.
Dr. Fred H. Coleman, chairman of the commission, gave several
reasons for the action. First, he pointed to a statute which was passed
by the North Carolina General Assembly some years ago forbidding
persons to appear in public with their identity concealed. Second, Dr.
-—-xColeman referred tn last week’s
CHICAGO THUMPED
BY PHIL NINE, 6-3
CHICAGO, May 24.—(IP)— The
Chicago Cubs tumbled the .500
mark as they bowed, 6-3, to the
last-place Philadelphia Phils before
a paid crowd of 3,178 today.
Dick Barrett gave the Bruins
only five hits-, but two were homers
by Harry (Peanuts; Lowrey and
Andy Pafko which accounted for
all three Cub runs. ,
The Phils chased big Paul Der
ringer in during the fifth as they
shoved across five markers on five
singles. Derringer, trying for his
sixth win, was touched for a walk
and four straight singles, before
he was relieved by Mack Stewart
in the big Phil inning.
Philadelphia AblHO A E
Crawford, ss 4 2 2 1 4 0
Hinges, rf 5 113 0 0
Wssdell. if _ _ ' 5 1 23 00
Foxx, lb ' 3 0 0 6 1 0
BiMaggio, cf _' 4 0 1 4 0 0
Antonelli, 2b ZZZZZZZZ 4 0 15 10
Mancuso, c_ZZZZZZZZ 2 0 0 4 0 0
Picciuto, 3b 3 1 0 0 0 1
Barrett, p 4 1112 0
Totals _ 34 6 8 27 8 1
Chicago Ab R H O A E
Hack, 3b _ 4 0 0 2 2 0
Johnson, If _ ( 4 0 0 1 3 0
Nicholson, rf _ 2 0 1 2 0 0
Cavarretta, lb *' 3 1 0 8 3 0
Rice, c ' 401510
Pafko, et~~ZZZZZZZZZZ 411300
Lowrey, If _ 4 1 2 2 0 0
Schuster, ss _ 3 0 0 3 2 0
xxGillespit _ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Derringer, p _ 2 0 0 0 0 1
Stewart, p _ 0 0 0 1 1 0
xBecker _ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Erickson, p _ 0 0 0 0 1 0
xxxSecory _ 1 0 0 0 0 0
xBafted for Stewart in 7th.
xxBatted for Schuster in 9th.
xxxBatted for Erickkon in 9th.
Score by innings:
Philadelphia _ 100 050 000_6
Chicago _”_000 201 000—3
Runs batted in—Crawford 1. Wasdcll
3. Di Maggio 2. Pafko, Lowrey 2. Two
base hit—Crawford. Home Runs—Pafko,
Lowrey. Stolen base—Cavarretta. Double
play—Schuster, Johnson and Cavarretta.
Left on bases—Philadelphia 6, Chicago 6.
Bases on b^lls—Barrett 3; Derringer 1;
Stewart 2; Erickson 2. Strikeouts—Bar
rett 4; Derringer 2, Erickson 2. Hits—off
Derringer 6 in 4 1-3 innings; Stewart 1
n 2 2-3; Erickson 1 in 2. Losing pitcher
—Derringer. Umpires—Stewart. Dunn and
VTagerkurth. Time—2:12. Attendance —■
1,178.
-v
7,000 Battle Veterans
Are Home From Germany
(Continued from Page One)
Pacific, soldiers eligible for dis
charge, and wounded and liberated
prisoners of war.
The men were rapidly debarked
and transported to New York port
of embarkation installations for
processing. They were told that
red tape would be held to a mini
■num so that furloughs would start
for those eligible within 24 hours.
Eddy said he wants to get into
the Pacific war.
“There’s nothing wrong with me
:hat a couple of weeks fishing on
the gulf coast won’t cure,” he
said.
Godfrey, a six-footer, escaped
after months in a German prison
camp. He was shot down over
fannover August 24.
His main concern today was how
le is going to contact an Army
curse, Lt. Charlotte Frederick,
Rochester, Pa., who was on duty
somewhere in France when he last
leard from her.
“I’d like to take a crack at Ja
pan,” he said. “If she goes to
she Pacific, I’ll definitely go
here.”
-V
DRAFTED
BOSTON, May 24.— <U.R) —Clem
Dreiswerd who was counted on to
;ive the Boston Red Sox some
southpaw pitching strength, will
■eport for induction into the Army
omorrow at Fort Devens.
Thalian Hall bouts in which the
Masked Marvel was to show his
face, if beaten by Meyers. The
Marvel ran out of the ring with
out unmasking, and the commis
sion feels that the fans are en
titled to some reconciliation.
Attorney Bill Rhodes, member
of the commission, said, “It is
not tha desire of the commission
to do away with wrestling in the
community, but to place it on a
level so high that the fans will
have absolutely no doubt in their
minds but that everything is on
the up and up’’.
The third member of the Box
ing and Wrestling Commission is
H. Edmond Rodgers.
The commission also ruled that
the match between Sonny Myers
and the Masked Marvel was no
match, and that the two would
have to meet in this week’s bouts.
Bert Causey, local promoter, who
attended the meeting, said that in
stead of Myers and Lee tusseling in
the opener, and the Marvel and
Jimmy Coffield meeting in the
other match, as preeviously plan
ned, that the matches would be
reversed, and Myers will tangle
with the Marvel while Daffy Don
meets Coffield.
The name of the Marvel will
not be revealed until time for the
bout, however, he will not go into
the ring with his mask on.
The bouts are slated to get under
way tonight at 8:30 p.m., with the
doors opening at 7:30 to accom
modate the good-seat seekers.
-V
COMMUNISTS PLAN
POLITICAL MOVE
(Continued from Page One)
cussions would be conducted "with
in the Communist political associa
tion . . . according to its own
rules,” and said "all practical
work now under way in the labor
and progressive movement should
continue along established ljnes.”
Duclos declared that Browder
and his supporters were "sowing
dangerous opportunist illusions”
in interpreting the Teheran de
claration by Russia, Great Britain
and the United States as “a politi.
cal platform of class peace in the
United States.”
American communists were right
in supporting President Roosevelt
for a fourth term, the French
leader said, but "nothing justifies
the dissolution of the American
communist party.”
Browder reported when the party
dissolved last May that it had
90,000 members, including 10,000
in the armed forces.
He said that in the interest of
national unity "we will participate
in political life as independents,
through the established party or
ganizations of our progressive as
sociates, without committing our
selves to any party label.”
The communist political assoc
iation which succeeded the party
was formed, Browder said, “to en
able the communists to function
most effectively in the changed
political conditions and to make
still greater contributions toward
winning the war and securing a
durable peace.”
AT AIL MOO SHOE R?AIIEfiS
/
Nice Catch
Kitemen To Entertain
Davis Nine Tomorrow
Local baseball fans will be treat
ed to another game Saturday night
at Legion field when the Wil
mington Pirates meet the Camp
Davis Blue Brigade in the second
of the three game series.
The Buccaneers defeated the
Brigade, 4-3, here Wednesday night,
in the opening game of the series.
The first contest was a bang up
game all the way through. The
lead changed hands three times
during the nine innings.
Captain Ken Kavenaugh of the
Camp Davis club announced that
his lineup would be ‘‘about the
same,” with maybe a. couple of
changes. Jack Early, who did a
good job of hurling in the first
game, will probably be held in re
serve Saturday night. Either Bar
mish or Eager will get the pitch
ing assignment.
Bert Kite, “Major” to the Pi
rates, said he would use the same
lineup but would call upon the
services of Pate Fish or Dolly
Lambert for the mound. Lewis
Cheshire, speedball righthander,
who set the Camp lads down with
three hits in the last game will be
held in reserve.
The Pirates have played two
games under the arcs at Legion
Field while the Camp Davis team
has played only one game this
season.
The third game of the series
will be played Sunday afternoon at
2:30 o’clock at Camp Dsvis, Kite
said.
Next Wednesday night the Wil
mington club will play the Camp
Lejeune Marines at Legion Field.
Arrangements are now underway
for a series of three games with
this club, local officials said last
night. i
Dave Ferriss Tells
How He Got Name
BOSTON, May 24.—(U.R)—Dave
(Boo) Feniss of the Boston Red
Sox who has won the first five
games he has pitched in the
Major leagues, explained to
night he acquired his nickname,
“Lots of folks think I’m call
ed ‘Boo’ because I say that to
batters to scare ’em,” drawled
the lanky Mississippian. “That’s
not so at all. I got the name
when I was a little shaver be
cause I couldn’t say 'brother’
—the closest 1 could come to it
was ‘Boo.’ ”
BRAVES HUMBLED
BY PIRATES, 10-9
PITTSBURGH, May 24. —(JP)—
Johnny Barrett’s 11th inning hom
er snapped the tension in, a wild
scoring duel between Pittsburgh
and Boston today as 2,156 fans
saw the Pirates nose out the
Braves, 10-9, in a game that was
tied four times.
The Braves nearly had the game
in the bag in the 10th when Tom
Holmes doubled bringing in two
runs. Jn their half of the inning,
the Pirates, with a man on base,
put in pinch hitter Lee Handley
who duplicated the feat to tie up
the game, 9-9.
■the Buccos used 20 players to
whip the Braves in the second ov
ertime game of this four-game ser
ies. The see-saw tilt was knotted
in the first, seventh, eighth and
tenth innings.
Rookie Ken Gables who went on
the mound in the 11th, was credit
ed with a win and Bob Logan, who
entered in the tenth, with a loss.
Barrett’s homer was obtained off
Logan’s first pitched ball in the
11th inning.
The Pirates did so much pinch
hitting that the regular staff was
used up and the game ended with
Shortstop Frankie Gustine behind
the batter’s box as catcher.
Bo,t°“ AblHO A E
2*> _ 6 115 4 1
Holmes, rf _ 5 2 3 2 0 1
Nieman, If_ 5 2 3 1 0 2
Mack, lb ..__ 4 1 2 14 2 0
workman, 3b 5002i0
Kiuttz. c_401210
Ulisney, c_ 2 110 0 0
Culler, as _3 0 0 1 2 0
Wietelmann, ss 3 2 2 1 3 0
Andrews, p_""" 4 0 0 0 2 0
xRamsey _ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Logan, p_o o o o o o
Total* . 48 » 15a30 18 4
xBatted for Andrews In 10th.
■None out when winning run scored.
Pittsburgh ~ Abll O A E
Saltzgaver. lb _ - 6 1 0 1 5 0
Barrett, cf __3 3 4 1 0 0
Gionfriddo, rf ^_ 40 1201
Elliott, 3b 4 0 1 2 2 1
Ruaaeii, h 500400
Dahlgren, lb ___ 5 1 1 12 1 0
Gustine, ss-c ' 5 2 3 3 5 1
Salkeld, c ...“"“'I 3 116 0 0
aZak_ 0 0 0 0 0 0
LOP**. 0 0 0 0 0 0
aDavis_ - 1 0 1 0 0 0
cWaner_ 0 1 0 0 0 0
Coscarart. ss _ __ 0 0 0 1 0 0
Strincevich, p ^ ~ 1 0 0 0 1 0
xO’Brien __ "" 10 10 0 0
yBamhart _ 0 1 0 0 0 0
Butcher, p 0 0 0 1 1 0
bHandley _ .101000
Cuccurullo, p 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gables, p_0 0. 0 0 0 0
Totals .. 41 10 14 35 15 3
xBatted for Strincevich in 7th.
yRan for O’Brien in 7th.
zRan for Salkeld in 8th.
aBatted for Lopez in 10th.
bBatted for Butcher in 10th.
cRan for Davis in 10th.
Score by innings:
Boston _ 200 010 310 20— 8
Pittsburgh __ _ 220 000 210 21—10
Runs batted in—Nieman 2. Mack, Rus
sell 2, Saltzgaver, Workman, Gillen
water 2. Gionfriddo 2, Joost, Salkeld,
Holmes 2, Barrett. Two base hits—Gus
tine, Nieman 2, Barrett, Gillenwater,
Dahlgren, Holmes, Davis, Handley. Three
base hits—Gionfriddo, Wietelmann. Home
run—Barrett. Stolen bases—Barrett. El
liott. Sacrifices—Strincevich, Butcher,
Mack. Double plays—Joost, Culler and
Mack; Wietelmann. Joost and Mack. Left
on bases—Boston 11, Pittsburgh 7. Base
on balls—Andrews 4, Strincevich 2, But
cher 1, Cuccurullo 1. Struck out—Strince
vich 5. Andrews 2, Butcher 1. Hits—off
Strincevich 10 in 7 innings; Butcher 3 in
3; Andrews 10 in 9; Logan 4 in 1; Cuc
currullo 1 in 0 (faced two batters);
Gables 1 in 1. Wild pitch—Andrews.
Winning pitcher—Gables. Losing pitcher
—Logan. Umpires— Pinelli. Ballanfant
and Boggess. Time—2:53. Attendance—2,
156.
-V
North Carolina Plans
Larger Soybean Crop
RALEIGH, ^lay 24.— (£>) —The
State Department of Agriculture
said today that North Carolina
farmers probably will plaint 250,000
acres of soybeans this year, 92,000
of which will be harvested in north
eastern counties alone. The 1943
crop was valued at $4,395,000.
YANKEES TROUNCE
WHITE SOXERS, 6-3
Chicago Commits Four
Bungles; Cuccineilo Raps
Out Three Singles
NEW YORK, May 24. - (JP) —
Four errors, two of them by Rookie
Shortstop Cass Michaels, all but
cost the Chicago White Sox the
American League lead today as the
New York Yankees rapped out a
6-3 margin to take second place.
Atley Donald tossed the Yanks to
within a half game of the Pale
Hose but he was touched freely for
12 hits, one more than the win
ners collected off Orval Grove,
Johnny Johnson, Frank Papish and
Earl Caldwell.
Bud Metheny drove in half the
New York scores, starting with a
single after Georgee Stirnweiss
tripled in the first, cashing Donald
with a double in the esecond and
singling home Herb Crompton in
the fifth.
Frank Crosetti’s infield single,
a passed ball by Mike Tresh and
Michael’s second misiJlay on Don
ald’s bouncer produced the first
of two second inning tallies. After
Roy Schalk booted Stirnweiss’ rol
ler, Metheny followed with his dou
ble.
Metheny walked in the fourth,
moved to third on Hersh Martin's
single and came across as Johnny
Lindell rapped into a double play.
Crompton doubled and the final
run in the seventh when Stirnweiss
came through with a two-bagger.
The White Sox broke the shut
out in the fifth on Michaels’ dou
ble to left, a force out and Oris
Hockett’s single to left. After John
ny Dickshot walked to open the
eighth, Bill Nagel erased him on
a force play but Tony Cuccinello’s
third single of the day, and one
basers by Schalk and Tresh added
two scores.
It was the third victory for Don
ald and a second setback for Grove
who had copped three.
Chicago Ab K H O A E
Moses, rf _ 5 0 2 1 0 0
Hockett, cf _ 5 0 1 2 0 0
Dickshot. If _ 3 0 0 0 0 1
Nagel, lb __ 5 119 0 0
Cuccinello, 3b __ 5 1 3 0 4 0
Schalk, 3b I 4 0 1 5 2 1
Michaels, ss Z_ZZ„ 4 113 2 2
Tresh, c ZZZZ 2 0 2 4 1 0
Grove, p ZZZZZZZZZZZ 1 0 0 0 0 0
xBaker_Z ZZZZZZZ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Johnson, p_ZZZZZZZ, 0 0 0 0 1 0
xxCurtright 10 10 0 0
Papish, p_ZZZZZZZZZZ 0 0 0 0 1 0
xxxFarrell _ZZ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Caldwell, p ZZ.ZZZZZZZ 0 8 0 0 1 0
Totals 37 3 12 24 12 4
xBatted for Grove in 5th.
xxBatted for Johnson in 7th.
xxxBatted for Papish in 8th.
New York Ab R H O A E
Stirnweiss, 2b_ 4 1 2 3 2 0
Metheny, rf__ 4 1 3 2 0 0
Martin. If 4 0 1 3 0 0
Lindell, cf". 5 0 1 2 0 0
Etten. lb 2 0 0 5 2 0
Grimes, 3b _~ 5 0 0 4 1 0
Crosetti. ss_ 4 1 2 4 2 0
Crompton, c 421300
Donald, p 3 1112 0
Totals _ 35 6 11 27 9 0
Score by innings:
Chicago 000 010 020—3
New York"_120 110 lOx—6
Runs batted in—Metheny 3; Donald,
Hockett, Stirnweiss, Schalk, TreSh. Two
base hits—Metheny, Michaels, Cromp
ton, Stirnweiss. Lindell. Three base hit—
Stirnweiss. Stolen bases—Moses. Sacri
fice—Donald, Etten. Double plays—Etten
(unassisted); Cuccirello, Schalk and
Nagel; Stirnweiss, Crosetti and Etten.
Left on bases—Chicago 11; New York 13.
Bases on balls—Grove 4; Donald 4;
Johnson 2. Strikeouts—Donald 2; John
son 1; Papish 1. Hits—off Grove 7 in 4
innings; Johnson 1 in 2; Papish 2 in 1;
off Caldwell 1 in 1. Passed bal.l—Tresh.
Losing pitcher—Grove. Umpire—Weafer,
McGowan. Passarella and Stewart. Time
—2:03. Attendance—5,249 paid.
---V
Wilmington Officer
Is Reported Freed
Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Craig, 318 N.
4th St., have received notifica
tion that their son, Lt. Edward M.
Craif, is safe and is expected to
return to this country in a month
or two. Lt. Craig was reported
missing in action March 2, and
has been interned in a prisoner
of war camp in Germany. Hie
camp was liberated by the Third
Army April 29.
Letters from Lt. Craig to his par
ents say that he was flown from
Germany to France, where he is
waiting to be shipped back to the
U. S.
Lt. Craig was co-pilot of a B-17
which was damaged by flak and
German fighter planes in a raid
on Dresden. All the crew baile
out safely after the controls of the
plane were shot and two engines
destroyed.
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Chap. 8
■.■»<■■■ | "■ ...
JAMES DUNN
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