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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, June 25, 1945, Image 3

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P1ERETTI HURLS
WIN OVER BRAVES
BOSTON, June 54—(^>)—With Ma
rino Pieretti allowing only six
scattered hits, Washington defeat
the Red Sox 5-2 in the second
me 0t a doubleheader today at
Fenwa.v Park, after Bos'on shaded
.he Senators f-5 in the opener.
FIRST GAME
The BuX •
u VilllNGTON Ab R II O A
a .e of - 4 0 2 2 1
Mv.-tl. rf —f.. 4 0 12 0
Kni,el. lb —i- 4 118 1
r (• 3b -- 2 3 2 2 4
B V cf -i- 4 12 10
t vot. - 4- < 0 2 2 2
nTier., c - *2215
53fc.p p :::::::::::: Hill
X- _ 0 0 0 0 0
Zardor. xx - _0 _0 _0 0 0
TOTALS _ 93 5 10 24 11
y—Batted for Wiggelilag n Oth.
pan for Uyne in 9th.
The Rox :
BO<TOXX Ab R H O A
_ 41121
Steiner.' 2b - 4 0 0 4 4
r iherxon. cf -- 4 0 14 0
ftnson. 1* - « \ * * °
Ne^ome. 3b -
MCkovirh, lb - ? J \ }
r'rher C z 19 0 0 0
IX. P - j 4 J 2
TOTALS -- 6 9 27 10
Score by innings:
Ratied for Holm in 8th
v'aWNGTC'N _ 020 001 020-5
uoSTON _ 000 001 32x—6
bJ SECOND GAME
WASHINGTON Ab R H O A
; n, 40100
E i; :::::: l ? ?i? ?
EE S i ? b o
E c$r-1112 4«
Fa 1 .L „ 3 0 0 0 0
Pieretti. P ---
totals _ 38 5 11 27 13
OOslON Ab R H O A
, fr ss _z_ 3 12 4 2
c.; ,ei ' 2b _ 3 0 0 33
&= II
*s^= iisii
IUt t' 77 10 10 0
1 el rirs. zz i P 0 1 1
H ■'-mann. P -j 1'o 0 0 1
Tt[v; P7-1„ 10 10 0
Barrett. p ::::::::_ ° ° ° ° °
TOTALS _ 31 2 6 27 12
z_Batted for Terry in 7th.
ZZ- Batted for Valters in 9th.
zzz Batted for 3arrett in 3th.
Score by innings:
WASHINGTON - 011 120 000—5
BOSTON _ 110 000 000 3
REDS. PJRATES
DIVIDE HEADER
CINCINNATI. June 24. —UP)—
Joe Bowman won his fifth straight
game as ths Cincinnati Reds de
feated the ' Pittsburgh Pirates 4-3
in the nightcap of a doubleheader
after Pittsburgh took the opener
7-5.
FIRST GAME
The Box:
PITTSBURG Ab R H O A
Handley. 3b _ 3 10 15
C-:nnfr>'ddo. cf ___ 3 0 13 0
if _ _ 4 12 3 0
r«ntt.' n _ ‘ 1 1 0 2
D?hl?ren, lb - 3 1 0 10 2
Pa5t?.iavpi. 2b _ 5 12 2 1
Cos'vjrart. 2b _ 0 0 0 1 i
E”'",’ordt. ss ____ 5 0 3 2 5
I ,De*. c _ 3 10 3 0
Sewell, p _ 2 112 1
Slrincevirh. p _ 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS _ 33 7 10 27 15
The Box’
( fVClVNATI Ab R H O A
Co,- _ 5 0 15 0
Wpiker, rf _ 5 13 10
] hke. If __ 4 0 0 2 0
H-^nrmick, lb _ 5 0 18 1
Vii’er cq ____ 5 0 0 1 3
y°'oe'r. 3b "IIIIIIII-_ 3 1 2 4 4
V'Uii>m?. 2b _ 3 114
r«SPr. c ___ 4 112 1
F'ddle. p _ 0 0 0 0 0
D.iffo. p _ 3 0 0 0 0
I.;**»nbe, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
Spiek. 7. _ 1110 0
TOTALS ___ 38 5 10 27 11
z—Batted for Lisenbe in 9th.
Score by innings:
PITTSBURGH _ 003 010 030-7
CINCINNATI _ 100 000 004—5
SECOND GAME
Tiie Box: _ ,
PITTSBURGH Ah R H O A
Handley. 3b _ 4 0 2 2 0
Gionfriddo. cf _ 4 0 12 0
bussed, if __ 4 0 0 1 0
FI licit rf 3 114 0
lravis, c 3 0 0 5 1
Gu line. X _ 0 10 0 0
Lopez, c _ 0 0 0 0 0
Loieman. xx _ 1 0 0 0 0
Bahlgren, lb _ 4 0 2 5 0
Barnhart, ss. _ 2 0 0 2 3
Cnscarart, 2b _ 3 12 3 2
Butcher, p _. 3 0 0 0 1
TOTALS _ 31 3 8 24 7
x—Ran for Davis n 7th.
xx Bated for Lopetz in 9th.
CINCINNATI Ab R H O A
Clay. cf _ 4 2 3 0 0
Walker, rf _ 4 0 0 2 0
fpton, u_o o o o o
i.ibkc. u-rf _ 31110
McCormick, lb _ 3 1 3 13 1
Meaner. 3b 4 0 111
Miller, ss .1111111111_ 3 0 13 7
Wiliams, 2b .20148
Unser. c _ 4 0 0 3 0
Bowman, p _ 4 0 0 0 1
TOTALS _ 31 4 10 27 18
Sneer by innings :
PITTSBURGH 0000 000 300—3
CINCINNATI _ _ 012 000 lx—4
-V
A- R Gunn is a military police
man in Battle Creek. Mich.
llliilmillllllMMIIMMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
jortAH IKNj
I Excellent Neals [
COOL ROOMS |
= Your Pleasure I
= Is Our Business 5
| Wrightsville , =
| Beach, N. C. =
= Mrs. Pauline C. Johnson ;
^ Owner s
.......
Two Warsaw Servicemen
Earn Military Medals
<-JVARSAW’ June 24.-Cpl. David
Charles Miller, son of C. G. Mil
ler, has been awarded the Dis
tinguished Unit Badge, it was
learned here. Miller’s fighter
group, the 356th, received the Dis
tinquished Unit Citation for "ex
tra ordinary heroism, dete mina
tion and esprit de corps in action
against an enemy of the United
States on September 17, 18 and 23
ol last year.
Pfc. Woodrow Williams, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Chesley Wililams, of
Beulaville, member of the 143rd
Kegiment, has been awarded the
Bronze Star Medal for achieve
T^n nV°mbat in France from
Jan. 11 through 13 of this year
CHICAGO SPLITS
CLEVELAND BILL
CLEVELAND, June 24. — (,/p) _
The Chicago White Sox scored
seven runs in the third inning today
to split a 'doubleheader with the
Cleveland Indians by taking the
afterpiece 7 to 4 after losing the
wT t0 3- Ed Lo?at won his
ga,me ln the nightcap, al
though relieved in the ninth inning
The Box: ™“T GAME
CHICAGO AK D II n
Moses, rf Ab „R ? ° A
Schalk, 2b I.- * ? ? \ 0
Baker, 3b _ ! \ } ; “
Nagel, lb _ 2 n h n ?
Darrell. ,b __ 1 0 0 ? i
Michaels, ss - - 4 1???
Casdno c -~ S S S 1 o
Dietrich, p ____ 1 0 0 1 1
Reynolds, x -" 1 0 0 0 0
Johnson, p - 10 10 0
TOTALS - 34 3 8 24 6
x Batted for Detrich n 6th.
t',LEVELAND Ah R H O A
Meyer, 2b - 4 10 0 1
Rocco, lb - 5 2 3 8 1
2Dfu’ f* -.. 5 2 2 2 0
Boundreau, ss _ 3 0 0 4 2
Haver, c - 3 0 17 1
Ross. 3b - 4 0 0 2 3
Mackiewicz. cf _ 4 12 10
Gromek p -4 0 110
TOTALS - 36 7 11 27 8
Score by innings:
CHICAGO - 000 000 012—3
CLEVELAND _ 200 020 12x—7
SECOND GAME
The Box:
CHICAGO Ab R H O A
Moses, rf - 5 0 10 0
Schalk, 2b _ 4 114 5
Curtright, cf _ 5 0 0 3 0
Dickshot. If _ 3 10 10
Cuecinello, 3b _ 4 12 0 2
Baker, 3b _ 0 0 0 0 1
Nagle, lb _ 4 115 0
Tarrell, lb _ 0 0 0 6 0
Michaels, ss _ 4 12 2 5
Tresh, c _ 4 10 5 0
Lopat, p - 3 1111
CJadwell, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS _ 36 7 8 27 14
The Box:
CLEVELAND Ab R H O A
Meyer, 2b _ 4 0 0 1 3
Rocco. lb _ 4 0 C 10 0
O’Dea, rf _ 2 0 0 2 0
Seerey, rf _ 110 0 0
Heath, cf _ 4 2 3 4 0
Boudreau, ss _;_ 4 110 2
Hayes, c ___ 2 0 14 0
McDonnell, c _ 1 0 0 3 0
Hoag, z _ 0 0 0 0 0
Ross. 3b _ 4 0 12 2
Mackiewtcz, cf _ 4 0 0 1 0
Henry, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
Salveson, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
Center, p _ 2 0 0 0 0
Wiliams, z _ 1 0 0 0 0
Carnett, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS _33 4 5 27 7
7.—Batted for McDonnell in 9th.
zz—Batted for Center in 8th.
Score by innngs:
CHICAGO _ 007 000 000—7
CLEVELAND _ 000 000 202—4
__\T__
GANDHI WILL NOT
JOIN CONFERENCE
(Continued From Page One)
ing of the day with Maulana Abul
Kalan Azad, president of the Con
gress party. His second meeting
was with Mohandas K. Gandhi.
Each interview lasted 90 minutes.
The Sikh leader, Tara Singh, met
Waved’s private secretary, Cir
Evan Jenkins.
Among the Questions posed foi
the Viceroy was one by Gandhi or
whether the Congiess - League
parity proposed for the new gov
ernment would be on a strictly
political party basis or on religious
community lines. The Congress in
sists it is a national group, repre
senting all communities, and ob
jected to the use of the term,
• Castle Hindus,” in the Viceroy’s
original announcement oi the pro
posals.
_v_
50 NATIONS SAY
PARLEY SUCCESS
(Continued From Page One)
unity. Delegates viewed the pros
pect that Britain, the United
States and Russia soon will be
able to recognize this new govern
ment as a bright omen for the
future, as demonstrating that
these three great powers can work
together, as they must do under
the Charter if hopes 'or peace are
to be realized.
Conference delegation chiefs will
meet President Truman tomorrow
at Hamilton Field and follow him
in a triumphal procession across
the Golden Gate Bridge, through
the city of San Francisco, to the
Fairmont Hotel headquarters of
the American delegation.
Dinners and receptions are scat,
tered through Mr. Truman’s
schedule.
Just when the Charter signing
will begin has not been settled.
It may start late tomorrow and
resume early Tuesday. But the
conference definitely closes with
the presidential address, scheduled
for 4:30 p. m. (PWT) Tuesday.
--
Some stars are estimated to have
interior temperatures of 1,800,000,
1000 degrees Fahrenheit.
GIANTS TAKE TWO
IN PHILLY BATTLE
PHILADELPHIA. June 24.—W
Rookie Bill Emmerich of the New
York Giants, scattered seven hits
to defeat the Philadelphia .Phillies
5-1 in the second game of a dou
bleheader today. The Giants
fought an uphill battle and halted
a ninth-inning rally by the Phils
to win the first game 7-6.
FIRST GAME
The Rox -
NF.W VORK Ab R H O A
Rucker, cf . _ 4 2 2 0 0
Hausmann, 2b _ 5 0 4 5 2
'lardella, If _ 4 0 0 2 0
Ott. rf - 5 0 0 3 0
Welntraub. lb _ 5 0 0 11 1
Lombardi, c _ 3 12 0 0
Malory, x - 0 10 0 0
Kluttz, c _ 2 0 0 2 0
Reyes. 3b - 5 2 2 0 3
Kerr, ss - 0 0 0 0 1
(urges, ss _ 3 12 3 5
Voiselle. p - 2 0 0 0 1
Treadway, xx _ 1 0 0-01
Feldman, p - 10 110
Hansen, p - 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS - 40 7 13 27 15
x-Ran for Lomnardi n 6tn.
xx—Batted for Voiselle in 6th.
PHILADELPHIA Ab R H O A
Flaser. ss _ 5 2 12 3
Antonellj. 3b _ 5 2 4 1 2
Montea gudo. rf _ 5 1 1 2 (1
WasdelJ. lb_ 5 n 1 11 3
Dimaggio, cf _ 5 0 2 3 0
Dinger. If _ 3 12 3 1
Daniels, 2b _ 2 0 0 1 3
Crawford. 2b _ 2 0 0 1 0
Manchuso, c _ 3 0 110
Spindel, c _ 0 0 0 0 0
Barrett, p _ 1 0 0 2 0
Leon p _ 0 0 0 0 0
Triplett, z _ 1 0 0 0 0
Coffman, p _ 0 0 0 0 1
Foxx. zz _ 1 0 0 0 f
TOTALS - 38 6 12 27 13
z—Batted for Leon in 7th.
'Z—Batted for Coffman in 9th.
Score by innings:
NEW YORK __ 000 204 010—7
PHILADELPHIA _ 210 000 003—0
SECOND GAMF
NEW YORK Ab R H O A
Rucker, cf _ 5 12 3 0
Hausmann. 2b _ 3 2 2 2 2
Mallory, rf _ 5 1110
Gardella, If _ 5 10 10
Weintraub, lb _ 5 0 1 12 0
Kluttz, c _ 5 0 2 3 0
Reyes. 3b _ 4 0 2 2 1
Jurges. ss _ 2 0 0 3 3
Emmerick, p _ 4 0 0 0 2
OTALS _ 38 5 10 27 8
The Box:
PHILADELPHIA Ab R H O A
Crawford, DD _ 4 0 0 1 2
Antonelli, 3b _ 4 0 0 2 1
Monteagudo, rf _ 4 13 2 0
Wasdell, lb _ 4 0 16 0
Dimaggio, cf _ 4 0 0 7 0
Linges, If _ 3 0 2 2 0
Daniels, 2b _ 3 0 0 1 2
Triplett, x _ 1 0 0 0 0
Seminck, c _ 4 0 16 0
Mauney, p _ C 0 0 0 0
Scott, p _ 2 0 0 0 0
Spindel. xx _ 1 0 0 0 0
Karl, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS _ 34 1 7 27 5
x—Batted for Daniels in 9th.
xx—Batted for Scott in 7th.
Score by innings:
NEW YORK _ 400 001 000—5
PHILADELPHIA _ 000 000 1—1
TROPICAL STORM
MOVING SEAWARD
(Continued From Page One)
of Brunswick, Ga., when it was
still moving out to sea in a North
easterly direction. It is maintain
ing a forward speed of about 20
miles an an hour.
The storm’s force, weakened
during its trip across Florida, was
building up again over open water
and an 8 P. M. (EWT) Weather
Bureau advisory warned that 60
mile an hour gale wind would prob
ably lash the coastline as far
north as Norfolk. Va., lale tonight
and early Monday morning. The
storm will cause higher than nor
mal tides, the advisory said.
“All interests on the Carolina
and Virginia coasts should be on
the alert and stand by for further
;dvice tonight," the wpather bu
reau said The bulletin said that
gales and hurricane winds would
orevail out to sea.
The advisory said that winds of
.15 miles an hour were recorded
at the resort of Tybee, Ga., 16 miles
East of Savannah.
Storm warnings remained dis
olayed from Fernandma, Fla., to
Norfolk.
The storm struck the Florida
West Coast between Tampa and
Dunnellon this morning with full
hurricane force and followed the
oath of last year’s destructive $25,
000,000 blow across the state. This
‘ime, however, damage — mostly
from heavy rainfall and a few
broken telephone lines—was small
r, Innoli'mcl
Peak wind velocity was record
ed near Tampa at 100 miles an
hour but it rapidly diminished in
force and was down to 45 miles an
hour when the storm went out to
sea, according to the Weather Bu
reau. Forward movement of the
season’s first tropical disturbance
in this area was last reported at
between 17 and 20 miles an hour
The Weather Bureau cautioned
that the storm may regain some
of its intensity over open water
and advised caut’on for shipping
off the Georgia and Carolina
coasts throughout the day.
In contrast to the 1944 hurriance
that destroyed much of ihe state s
citrus crop, this one partially re
paid the damage bill from last
vear by loosing a deluge of rain
to end a long drought. Nine inches
fell at Tampa in 36 hours.
R. C. Evans, manager of the
Florida Citrus Commission, said
the rain was just what growers
needed to save their fruit.
-V
full tooth at birth
CHICAGO, June 24.- (U.R) —A
seven-and-one-half-pound boy born
recently to Mrs. Belty Jane Funck,
24, was equipped with a full-grown
tooth. Mrs. Func1 is the wife of
Wilbert Funck, a printing press
man.
-V
2,500 GEESE FLY NORTH
HELENA, Mont., June 24.—(U.R)
—The largest flock of Canadian
geese seen in Montana—more than
2,500 — recently was seen misgra
ting northward.
Obituaries
GEORGE T. NEWTON
Funeral services for George T.
Newton, Sr., 60, who died at his
home, 615 South Fifth avenue, will
be held at 4 p. m. Tuesday at the
Fourth S reet Advent Christian
church. Burial will be at the
Bellevue cemetery with the Rev
H. J. Wilson in charge.
Mr. Newton is survived by his
widow, Mary P. Newton; seven
sons, George, Jr., and Curtis of
Wilmington, James M. and Jack
S., of the U. S. Army, Thomas A.
and Joseph R. of the U. S. Navy,
Haywood P. Hall, Marine Corps;
three grand sons; one sister, Mrs.
J T. Williamson of Wilmington;
and fourteen nieces and four
nephews.
Mr. Newton was a member of
the Woodmen of the World, as well
as a member of the Order of Red
Men.
Active pallbearers will be J. W.
Reaves, Joseph Barbieri, Ray
mond Batson, Major Dukes, J. R.
Jenkins and Frank Fales.
Honorary pallbearers will be J.
R. Melton, Charley Snow, G. D.
Bradshaw, Sheriff C. David Jones,
Dr. R. B. Rodman, John H. Da
vis, W. H. Batson, John M. Sut
ton, D. E. Murray, W. P Smith.
Judge John J. Burney, W. E.
Hopp, Martin Van Olsen, T. K J.
Futch and L. N. Todd.
LOUIS B. PEARCE
Louis Bryan Pearce, of Wilming
ton, died Friday evening at the
home of his daughter in Washing
ton, D. C.
He is survived by his widow,
Mrs. Sudie Pearcd, of Wilming
ton; three daughters, Mrs. Roberl
D. Rudich, of San Diego, Calif.
Mrs. Gray Brewer and Mrs. Bev
erly A. Davenport, of Washington
D. C.; a son, Richard Petty, of
Washington, D. C.; and a sister.
Mrs. Maybelle P. Rice, of Prince
ton, W. Va.
Funeral services will be held at
3 p. m. today from the Yopp
funeral home, and burial will be
in the family lot at Scotts Hill
Methodist church cemetery.
UPTON B. SPINDLE
Funeral services for Upton B.
Spindle, 65, of Carolina Beach road,
who died Friday evening, will be
held at 3 p. m. today from the
Ward funeral home with the Rev.
W. C. Hunri, officiating. Burial will
be in the Bellevue cemetery.
He is survived by his widow,
Mrs. Jeanette Jones Spindle; a
daughter. Miss Mary Viola Spindle;
four sisters, Mrs. Ida Bennett, Vien
na, Va., Mrs. McNinemen, Alex
andria, Va., Mrs. Etta Shisler,
Canada, and Mrs. Lillian Daly,
Bristow,. Va.; and a brother, Zeno
Spindle, of Bristow.
MISS NELLIE LEARY
Funeral services for Miss Nellie
Leary, of Hampstead, who died.
Saturday, were held yesterday
from the Christ Sanctified Holy
church in Hampstead with the
Rev. Paul Merritt and the Rev.
Ray M. Smith, officiating. Burial
was in the family cemetery.
Surviving are a sister, Mrs. W.
D. Woodcock of Atkinson; her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. C.
Leary, of Hampstead; two other
sisters, Mrs. Daisy Batson and
Mrs. R. E. Horne, of Hampstead;
and a brother, W. R. Leary, of
Wilmington.
Active pallbearers were Gar
land Simond, Rufus Curry, Jr.,
David Jones, John Tuttle, Harold
Howard and Jed Sanders.
Honorary pallbearers were
Paul Merritt, J. H. Barnhill, J. C.
Howard, D. A. Howard, Johnnie
Garrison, Rufus Curry, Sr., T. C.
Merritt and Maxie Tuttle.
MRS. ELLEN M. WATTS
TABOR CITY, June 24.-Funeral
services for Mrs. Ellen M. Watts.
66, who died yesterday at the home
of her son, Lester Watts, of Route
1, were held at 5 p. m. yester
day at the New Life Baptist
church with the Rev. Bob Cartel
and the Rev. Nance Simmons, of
ficiating. Burial was in the Spivey
cemetery.
Besides her son, Mrs. Watts is
survived by four brothers. O. O
and J. J. Watts, of Tabor City. C.
H. Watts of Whiteville and J. T.
| Watts, of Wilmington.
JOHN T. PARISH
CHADBOURN, June 24,-Funer.
al services for John Thomas Par
ish, 76, who died yesterday at the
home of his son, T. J. Parish, of
Bladenboro. were held yesterday
at Thomson. Ga.
He is survived by seven sons,
Mr. Parish, of Bladenboro; Jim
Parish of Thomson, Ga.; John
Parish of Langley, S. C.; Grady
Parish of Stapelton, Ga.; Alex
Parish of Warrenton, Ga.; Jack
Parish of Gastonia; and George
Parish of Shallotte; four daugh
ters, Mrs. Walter Stewart, of
Wrens, Ga.; Mrs. Lewis Baker of
Warrenton, Ga.; Mrs. Ralph Huff
of Stapelton, Ga.; and Miss Dalph
Parish of New York, and on® step
son, Frank Todd, of Augusta, Ga.
AUGUSTUS BARTHOLOMEW
LAKE WACCAMAW, June 23. -
Funeral services for Augustus Bar
tholomew, 89, who died Saturday
morning at the Jones hotel, will
be held this afternoon at 5
o'clock at the McKenzie Chapel in
Whiteville, with the Rev. S. N
Lamb in charge.
A native of Pennsylvania, he had
made his home here for severa
years and was an active member
of Waccamaw Masonic Lodge of
Boiton.
Surviving is a son, Henry A.
Bartholomew of Washington and
one grandchild.
MRS. CORA M. MATTHEWS "
BURGAW, June 24.-Mrs. Cora
Moore Matthews, 79, died today a1
the home of her son, Elliot Mat
thews, of Atkinson.
She is survived by a daughter,
-\
Mrs. E. M. Wells, of Philadelphia,
Pa.; a son Elliot; two brothers. E.
B. Moore, of Clinton, and F S.
Moore, of RRosehill; a sister, Mrs.
W. L. Matthews, of Roseboro; and
seven grandchildren.
Funeral ^services will be held at
3 p. m. tomorrow from the Red
Hill church in Sampson county
with the Rev. Morris W. Cobbs,
pastor, officiating.
J. E. CANNARLEY
CHADBOURN, June 24. - J. E.
Cannarley died in Franklin, Va..
where he had made his home for
the past two years.
He was an employe of the At
lantic Coast Line Railroad Co., and
was a native of Columbus county,
having moved to Franklin from
Hallsboro.
He is survived by his widow; two
daughters, Mrs. Louise Long and
Mrs. L. R. Ray, both of Belton;
his father and stepmother, Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Cannarley, of Nakina:
nine brothers, Bob, Jo<- of Tabor
City, Lee, Donnie Mack, Tom.
Johnnie, all of Nakina, Pfc. George
of the U. S. Army overseas, and
Walter Cannarley, of Whiteville;
and seven sisters, Mrs. Charli
McLean, Mrs. McDuffie Hardwick.
Mrs. Dewitt White, Mrs. Edgar
Long, Mrs. Bill Suggs, of Nakina.
Mrs. Vesley Ward, of Whiteville,
anc. Mrs. Charlie Bullock of Green;
sea, S. C.
TWELVE GENERALS 1
RETURN BY PLANE
(Continued From Page One)
liam H. Simpson, commander of
the U. S. Ninth Army; Gen. Jacob
L. Devers, commander ot the Sixth
Army group, and Gen. Joseph T.
McNarney, commander of Ameri
can Army forces in the Mediter
ranean and Deputy Supreme Allied
commander in that theater.
Kepner, former commander ol
the Second Bombardment division
who will now command those ele
ments of the Eighth Air Force
which are not transferred to the
Pacific under Lt. Gen. James Doo
little, said he had no idea of the
devastation that had been wrought
in Germany until he made recon
naissance flights.
“It was like a desert wherever
we hit,” he said. “1 never saw a
picture of an earthquake that was
as bad as this. If 1 could take
Hirohito over Germany to see the
things that I saw after our raids,
he would quit right now.”
Also in the party arriving today
were Maj. Gen. Paul W. .Kendall,
acting commanding general of the
99th Infantry division; Maj. Gen.
S. Leroy Irwin, commander of the
12th Army Corps; Maj. Gen. Hor
ace L. McBride, commander of th?
80th Infantry division; Maj. Gen.
Milton A. Record, provost marshal
general; Maj. Gen. Edwin T. Park
er, Jr , commander of the 78th In
xaxii.xj' xxx v xaivxii , xvxaj. czcu. nuuam
M. Hoge, assistant chief of staff
U. S. Army; Maj. Gen. Frank A.
Keating, commander of the 102nd
Infantry division, and Brig. Gen.
Juliam M. ChappeJ. commander of
the 50th Troop Carrier wing of the
Ninth Carrier Command.
Their wives, children and rela
tives met the generals, officers
and men at La Guardia. Photog
raphers took pictures and the huge
Sunday crowd cheered as the men
alighted. They left quickly for
Manhattan where a conference
with newspapermen was scheduled
at the Waldorf-Astoria hotel.
Handsome, grey-haired Simpson
smiled broadly as his wife, Mrs.
Ruth Simpson of San Antonio, Tex.
ran half-way up the steps leading
to the plane and embraced him.
Photographers and newsreel men
asked Simpson to repeat the scene,
and he looked fondly at his wife
and said:
“1 could do this indefinitely.'’
Record posed for pictures with
two sergeants. Photographers
asked him to put his arms on
their shoulder and Record grinned
and said:
“That’s what I wanted to do
anyway.
McNarney, whose home is in
Emporium, Pa., was greeted by
his wife, Helen. He posed briefly
with six enlisted men before driv
ing away. Devers was met by his
daughter. Mrs. Alexander Graham
of Washington, D. .
The wives of McBride and Irwin
also were on hand and Record was
met by his daughter, Mrs. Fred
erick Jones of Baltimore, Md.
Also in the party were Capt.
Guy W. Hoyt of Portland, Ore.:
Maj. John D. Horn of New York:
Sgt. Frederick W. Johnston ol
Bradford, Pa : Sgt. Jospeh W.
Adams of Louisville, Ky., and Col.
Creight W. Abrams who led the
column which relieved the be
sieged American garrison at Bas
togne during the battle of the Bel
gian Bulge.
-V
iwo Negroes Arrested
On Larceny Charges
Joe Rogers, 26, of 1117 North
Tenth street, was arrested by city
police yesterday for storebleaking
and larceny and receiving. He was
put in jail ano his bond set at
$1,500. He was charged with
breaking into a store room, belong
ing to Sam Berger at 709 Norih
Fourth street, and taking clothing
valued at $100.
Joe Bellamy, Negro, 31, of 31f
North Seventh street^ was bookec
by Wilmington police yesterday toi
nousebreaking and larceny and re
ceiving. He was charged with
breaking into the room of Clo'eal
Moore at 316 South Seventh and
taking an ‘‘unknown amount oi
pennies.” His bond was set at
$1,500.
Positions Are Open
At Norfolk Navy Yard
H. G. Henderson, Wilmington
United States Employment Serv
ice representative of the Norfolk
Navy Yard, has been notified of
an urgent need for electricians at
the yard.
In additions, there are also op
enings in the following positions:
Brakemen, helper boilermaker,
electrician, helper pipefitter, help
er sheet metal worker, helper
trainee, classified labor, linotype
operator, ordancemen, pipe cov
erer and insulators, pipe fitter,
plumber, job printer and rigger.
Transportation will be furnished
to applicants eligible for appoint
ment, and suitable housing will be
provided upon arrival at duty sta
tion. For further information ap
ply to H. G. Henderson at the Wil
mington USES office.
-V
87,000 WORKERS
STILL ON STRIKE
(Continued From Page One)
meat in lunch sandwiches kept 7,
500 employes ot the Briggs Manu
facturing Company at home.
Chicago
Ellis T. Longenecker, Federal
manager of the city’s seized truck
ing lines, said the tieup ot essen
tial goods had been broken and
predicted prompt movement of all
war material and food stuffs. More
than 16,000 troops were stationed
in the city, but Longenecker re
ported many union drivers return
ing to their jobs after seeing their
trucks driven by soldiers. The
strike was in protest over a WLB
decision on wage rates.
Approximately 650 employes of
the National Malleable and Steel
Castings Company of Chicago were
to return to work today. But 1,100
workers at the R. R. Donnelley
& Sons Printing Company were
still idle.
There were no prospects for ter
mination of a widespread strike
affecting 15.000 glass workers in
10 cities. They include 8.000 from
six Pittsburgh Plate Glass Com
pany plants and 7.000 from four
Libbey - Owens - Ford Company
plants.
More than 400 bus drivers and
mechanics of the Tri-state Transit
Company of Louisiana continued
their two-week strike which has af
fected some 60,000 passengers in
nine states. The strikers, who left
their jobs in a dispute over wage
rates and olher grievances, studied
a WLB agreement to appoint a
national panel to consider their
problem if the walkout is ended.
Other strike situations which
continued unchanged included:
Stoppage of work by 40 printers
of the Jersey City, N. J., Journal
and by 18 at the Bayonne. N. Y.,
Times; walkouts of 1,000 workers
at the Acklin Stamping Company
and the Mather Spring Co . Toledo,
Ohio; 1,000 at the Anchor Hocking
Glass Co., Connellsville, Pa.; 500 at
the Houdaille-Hershey Co., Deca
tur, 111. Twentyseven hundred
workers at the Carter Carburetor
Company, St. Louis. Mo., voted to
return to work today.
-V
‘CHUTE’ TROOPS
JOIN BIG FIGHT
(Continued From Page One)
Philippines, with 9,238 killed and
1,483 taken prisoner. The prisoners
were mostly Formosan conscripts,
however.
This raised the Japanese casual
ties for the entire Philippines cam
paign to 413,084.
American casualties for the past
week were placed at 223 killed and
589 wounded.
Both for the Japanese and the
Americans, heaviest casualties
during the week were on Luzon
where the Japanese lost 7.711
dead and 1,399 captured against
148 Americans killed and 294
wounded.
Hamilton W. Faron, Associated
Press Correspondent who wit
nessed the airborne landing near
Aparri, reported that the operation
went off with the precision of a
practice maneuver.
The parachutists had cleared out
of their transports and hit the
ground within a breathtaking 120
seconds.
Ten minutes alter the jumps,
gliders slid gracefully to rest in
the fields of grass three to five
feet high.
The grass concealed some rough
hillocks and bomb craters on the
landing ground, which was near
the disused Japanese airfield of
Canalaniugan.
Fifth Air Force fighter bombers
supported the airborne operation
with more than 300 sorties, while
torpedo boats oflshore strafed Gon
zaga, 20 miles east of Aparri.
With these strong reinforcements
for the guerrillas at the north end
of the valley, and with the guer
rillas themselves holding the trails
leading into the wild mountains
that flank the valley, the Japanese
were confronting liquidation in the
very area where they made their
first invasion of tne Philippines on
Dec. 10, 1941. They invaded at
Aparri.
Some heavy fighting still was
under way in the Luzon mountain
provinces west of the Cagayan val
ley, however. The U. S. Sixth In
fantry division, driving on the ene
my stronghold of Kiangan, fought
off a strong enemy counterattack
northwest of the Payawan r e s t j
house Thursday night and Friday |
morning.
Since June 16, the Sixth Division
column has killed an average of
150 Japanese daily in its advance
along the hairnin turns of highway
No. 4, where dense forests, bam
boo thickets and steep cliffs offer
perfect defensive positions or the
enemy.
City Briefs
A meeting of the Public Re
lations committee of the Com
munity War Chest has been
called for 4 o'clock this after
noon in the offices of the Chest,
Rabbi M. M. Thurman, chair
man, announced Saturd. /.
REV. CEE PREACHES
‘‘Four Reasons Why We May .
Expect the End of the World
Any Day” is (he title of a ser
mon deli ^red last night by
the Rev. James R. Lee, pastor
of the First Advent Christian
church, 504 South Sixh St.
WILL PRESENT PAGEANT
The ‘‘Celestial City,” widely
heralded religious pageant, fea
turing a chorus of fifty voices,
will be presented at Central
Baptist church Tuesday night
at 8:30 o’clock.
SKETCH CLUB
The sketch club of the YWCA
held an afternoon session of
work in oils, water colors, pas
tels and charcoal at Greenfield
Lake yesterday afternoon. The
club no wis in process of or
ganization by the YWCA.
. -V
116 TARGETS HIT
BY U. S. BOMBERS
(Continued From Page One)
Forces and RAF under Mac
Arthur’s command lashed the Jap
anese along a 2,000-mile arc of the
South China Sea on Friday; fight
ers of the Seventh Air Force, of
Marine Air Wings and the U. S.
Pacific Fleet under Nimitz hit
them over a 3,000 mile stretch
from the Sakishimas Northeast of
Formosa to the Kuriles in the
north.
Ma -Arthur’s planes wrepked 40
river boats in the channel between
Hong Kong and Canton: sank two
coastal ships at Haiten in the Gulf
of Siam and left a freighter listing
and afire south ot Hong Kong. Ni
mitiz’ planes blew up a cargo ship
in Japanese home waters.
The planes of the Philippines
command alone heaped 66r' tons of
bom’fs on the Japanese in "le Phil
ippines. Formosa and Borneo and
. at least another 400 were dropped
A fleet of 90 Lightning fighters
and 30 Liberator bombers dropped
197 tons of bombs on oil storage
areas, refineries and a butanol
plant at Toshien, Heito and Mato
in Western Formosa. Flames leap
ing 2,000 feet into the sky were
seen.
More than 150 heavy, medium
and fighter bombers of all three
Philippines-commanded air forces
blasted Balikpapan, in Eastern
Borneo, with 200 tons while othe~
planes blasted Japanese positions
on Luzon and Mindanao with 263
tons.
-I
JAYCEES SEEKING
USED STATIONERY
Plans for the Wilmington Junior
Chamber of Commerce’s sixth
scrap paper drive were reported
well underway last night, as ~y
lohnson, campaign chairman, di
closed that the club is hoping to
complete its biggest local collec
tion July 8.
Johnston explained that the pro
ceeds of the drive will go towards
the club's external activities pro
gram for this year.
A plan for saving and bundling
such odd scraps of paper as enve
lopes, labels and other small pieces
jsually thrown away, was explain
ed by the campaign chairman.
By lining a cardboard box with
newspapers, with the string bind
ings underneath and fastened to
slots on the outside of the box to
fold them in place, the scrap pa
per may be drooped into the ne ws
paper linings and packed tightly
before tying.
After the bundle is bound and
removed from the box, Uie box
may be used to pack a second
Other members of the committees
for the campaign were announced
as follows;
Personnel, Ed Ward, Bob Carr
and Mat Herring; trucks, Gerald
Stokley, Clarence King and Jim
mie Sloane; routing, Carl Babson
and O. A. Wallace: publicity, Jim
my Simmons, Julius Berger,
George Willard and Lloyd Dunn;
handling, Jack Lee and Jack Har
relson.
Johnson pointed out last right
that truck routes were being plan
ned to take in as much of the sur
rounding territory of Wilmington
as the club’s equipment permits.
Residents have been urged to place
their bundles of scrap paper on
the curb in front of their homes by
1 p.m., July 8.
Complete truck routes will be
published as soon as they are an
nounced.
-V
Approximately 500 major league
ball palyers were in the armed
forces on Jan. 1, 1945.
St. John's Tavern
114 Orange Et.
Dial 3-8085
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“STEPPIN* IN SOCIETY”
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Today
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