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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, January 24, 1946, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1946-01-24/ed-1/seq-12/

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NICHOLS PROPOSES
JOINING STREETS
**j^ 'tnmnngmr C. Nichols pre
•Siffed a tentative proposal to
Join South Front street with the
Carolina Beach road at Greenfield
Lake yesterday. The plan was
favored by council members.
Creation of an Intersection at
the point in the Greenfield Lake
lector at which the Carolina
Beach highway and South Front
street come closest together will
necessitate installation of a traf
fic light there, Nichols said.
Couricilmen were shown a map
of the area • :id Nichols explained
that a more detailed map would
have to be accomplished before
the project could be proposed tc
the State Highway commission.
Although the proposal in its
tentative form required no official
council action, councilmen ex
pressed themselves as favoring
the junction of the two roads.
Elimination of duplication in
street names in Wilmington was
recommended by Nichols, and
each councilman was given a
mimeographed sheet listing the lo
cation of city streets now bearing
duplicated names for further
study.
Names of the streets, their lo
cation and recommendations with
reference to each duplication are:
Alabama, avenue, Summer Hill
retain; Alabama street, Greenfielc
terrace, not used. Cape Fear Ave
nue, city, change to Millis alley
Cape Fear street, city, retain'
Carolina avenue, city, could be
changed to Creasy; Carolina Ave
nue, Sunset Paik, council action:
Carolina street, Greenfield ter
race, co u n c i J action. Carolina
Beach boulevard, Sunset Park
changed to S. Third; Carolina
Beach road, Woodlawn, changed
to street. ]
Center avenue, Princess place
change; Center street, Delgado, re
tain. Church alley, city, change:
Church row, Delgado, change;
Church street, city, retain. Davi;
avenue (also Pauline extension)
and Pauline avenue, East Wilming
ton,, change to Pauline avenue;
Davis street, city retain. Dickinsor
alley (from Fourth to Fifth betweer
Red Cross and Walnut streets),
city, retain; Dickinson street, city,
suggest change to 10th street.
Elm street (Dexter), Delgado,
change to Dexter; Elm street, Sum
mer Hill, retain. Front street, city,
no recommendation; Front street,
(Burnett boulevard), Summer Hill,
make Front street or change to
Burnett boulevard beyond old city
limits; Front street (Burnett bou
levard), Sunset Hills*, change to
Burnett boulevard beyond old city
limits. Georgia avenue, Summer
Hill, retain; Georgia street, block
ed, in alley between Front and
Second streets; Georgia street, Sun
set Park, change.
Klein road, Princess place, re
tain; Klein street, Arcadi, change.
Lake Drive, Princess street, re
tain; Lake Drive, Greenbrook, re
tain; Lake street, Summer Hill,
change. Magnolia place, Oleander,
retain ; Magnolia street (Gore’s
row), city, change; Magnolia ave
nue, city, change. Market street,
city, and Market Street road be
yond Burnt Mill creek, change to
Market street beyond new city
limits. Park avenue, Glen Arden,
Oleander, retain; Park road, Green
field, already changed to Third
_i.__ i. . n__J xt t—i_i_ _i o
UllA VVt, -*■ UJLlk XUHU, 11. Jl Util UUU U•
Park roads, Princess place, change;
Park Terrare, Sunset Hills, change.
Park Terrace, Sunset Hills,
change.
cess street road, council action.
Tyler street, Sunset Park, change;
Virginia avenue, Summer Hill, re
tain; Virginia street, Greenfield
terrace, change.
Wilmington avenue, Wrightsville
avenue and Wrightsville turn-pike,
city, change any section in city
to Wrightsville. Re-name State
highway beyond or east of the end
of Dawson street. Now called by
sections: Myrtle avenue, Hydran
gea place, State Highway, Straw
berry avenue. Suggest Oleander
CO-EDS STUDY HOMEMAKING
NORMAN, Okla. — (U.R) — Forty
four University of Oklahoma co
eds are making sure they’ll not be
among the ones Cupid skips. When
they complete their work this
semester at the university they will
be prepared for homemaking the
scientific way.
The co-eds are enrolled in a
general survey course of home eco
nomics which was offered last fall
for the first time at the university.
Dial 2-3311 For Newspaper Service
RUItF of ^
SORE THROAT OR
HOARSENESS
DUE TO COLDS
DUST OR FUMES
«UftC*d AT
W$N*CKlt,J
DownuHake
nms
Give the family something to grow on, glow
•n, between meals. DOWNYFLAKE Donuts
fre rich in honest-to-goodness nourishment
—taste like dream donuts, too. The DOWNY
FIAKE machine makes 'em right before you
j—fresh and hotl
W THEM MADE AT. .4
C & B FOOD STORE
10th & Market St. *
Oysters—Steaks—Seafoods
WE SERVE ALL THE ROSE
BAY OYSTERS O I O C
YOU CAN EAT ...
with Clam Chowder, Corn Bread
Sauce, Butter and Coffee
FAIRCLOTH’S OYSTER
ROAST
Wrlghtsville Sound at Causeway.
I Entrance, Bus or car to door
Dial 8, Ask for 8715 for Reservations.
■FUEL;
SO I l:
® PROMPT SERVICE ®
■ MacMILLAN & ■
■ CAMERON CO. ■
Dial 9635 —
!■■■■■■!
Springer Coal & Oil Co.
Dependable Since 1873
Dial 5261
(MURRAY TRANSFER COMPANY k
Local and Long Distance Movers B
CRATING — PACKING — SHIPPING B
H. R. GARDNER, Mgr. »
Dial 5462 214 No. Water St. W
fuel FLEET OIL C0.FIIRI '
FOR REAL HEATING SATISFACTION
0IL DIAL 587 1 011
W. H. “BILL’ PALMER HOWARD L. “SMOKEY” HERREN
CLOSE-OUT SPECIAL! ||
Men’s or Boys’
RUBBER
Shoe Repair Dept. *3® |
H. L. GREENRVAR?ETY STORE ' 'P I
258 N. FRONT ST. ||
KIWANIANS \R
SHIPYARD STORY
As a rule, figures are cold and
colorless to the average citizen,
but members of the Wilmington
Kiwanis club yesterday found that
the facts and figures on the work
of the North Carolina Shipbuilding
company were not only enlighten
ing, but highly interesting as well
W. S. McMahon, assistant to the
general manager of the company,
was guest speaker at the regular
weekly luncheon meeting of the
club at the Friendly cafateria and
during the course of an instructive
talk, he presented a resume of the
work at the yard from the day the
first shovel of earth was turned
until the present time when the
company is engaged in turning out
a quota of six passenger-freight
ships for the Grace Line.
At the outset of his talk, Mc
Mahon traced the merchant ship
ping situation as it was in 1939;
of efforts made by the government
to get supplies to Allied nations
and of subsequent adoption of a
modified design of an ocean-type
vessel approved and paid for by
the British. Initial orders for this
type of ship totaled 60 with 30
being built in New England yards
and the rest in Canada, McMahon
said.
The stabilized design of ship
having been agreed upon, the
Maritime Commission besieged
shipbuilders of the nation for in
creased production. The Newport
News Ship Building company,
parent of the North Carolina com
pany, at the time was wholly com
mitted to production for the Navy,
but finally agreed to establish an
other yard and in September 1940,
Wilmington was selected as the
ideal location for the new yard.
Mr. McMahon then went on to
tell of the awarding of the first
contract here, that for the building
of the yard which was received
olnriff iirilVi art T iVior+v
ships. This first contract was
awarded to the company on Feb.
4, 1941 and on Dec. 6 of the same
year, the first ship to be built
here was launched. Five more
were behind that in construction
and enlargement of the yards and
building of ships went hand in
hand.
Construction of the first 25 ships
built here, the speaker said', was
slow but steady. Production was
gradually stepped up and the rate
of deliveries increased until in
May, 1943, 11 ships were turned
out complete. Three piers were
placed in operation and nine ship
ways constructed, enabling the
company, McMahon said, to in
crease their building program by
some 50 per cent.
By following automotive assem
bly-line methods, the company
reached a point of production
whereby only 30 days was required
from the time of keel laying until
the ship was sailing under her own
operating crew.
With the turning point of the
war in sight, the government turn
ed attention to a more permanent
type of vessel and’ the yard here
subsequently received a contract
for a large number of these dry
cargo ships which required altera
tions to the yard. The first con
tract for C-2’s was received late
in 1943 and some weeks later, the
first of four, “The Storm King”
was taken over by her crew here.
The Navy took four of these
ships, then four more.
Preparations were then made
for the building of AK-A’s, a spec
ial type ship.
Turning to more recent produc
tion results at the yard, the
speaker pointed out that the C-2
type vessel built here, has proved
so popular that two were ordered
by the United States Lines and six
by Grace Lines. So far, this type
of ship has been built for the Lykes
Line, U. S. Lines and Grace Lines,
the three most powerful merchant
shipping lines in this country.
Mr. McMahon dwelt briefly on
the construction of refrigerator
type ships here and pointed out
that the six passenger-cargo type
ships being constructed for the
Grace Lines (and which are feat
ured in an advertisement in the
current issue of The Saturday
Evening Post) are equipped with
baths and tiled swimming pool.
During the operational period of
the North Carolina Shipbuilding
company to date, ships have been
delivered, the speaker said, to 42
major ship operators and of the
total of over 200 ships turned out
by the yard, none have broken up,
although 28 were lost in combat,
24 by enemy action and the balance
scuttled by their crews. One C-2
type ship, an ammunition carrier,
blew up.
At the close, the speaker was
thanked for his fine address by
vice-president Rex Willis who pre
sided and who called attention to
the next board of directors meet
ing at his home on Wednesday,
Ian. 30. Col. J. B. McCullough was
a guest of the club and James A.
Scott was accepted into member
ship.
Swing your partner... Have a Coke
...the gang gets together at the “Y”
Boys and girls together make fun a sure-fire bet. And you can always
count on one friend of all of them being on hand—ice-cold Coca-Cola.
In the lingo of youth, Have a Co\e is the greeting that says You're
one of the crowd. It’s a standing invitation to have a good time and
enjoy the friendly pause.
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA ^COMPANY BY
WILMINGTON COCA - COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
Hear Morton Downey WMFD 6:30 P. M.
| Coke = Coca-Cola
[“Coca-Cola" and its abbreviation
|ucTof The^Coca-eSaVompany'
I_ — es 1946 The C-C Co. _| | j.
CITY BRIEFS
WRIGHTSVILLE MEET
The regular weekly meeting
of the Wrightsville Beach
Town Council will be held to
night. Routine matters are
expected to be discussed.
lights to go on
Bridge lights on the bridge
connecting Wrightsville Beach
which have been blacked out
since the. early days of the
war will be turned on soon ac
cording to Walter J. Cartier,
secretary of the Chamber of
Commerce, who said last night
that workmen are expected to
begin repairs to wiring and
other faclities soon.
MEET TONIGHT
The Women’s Bible class of
Grace Methodist church ^1
meet at 8 o’clock tonight at the
church. All members are urged
to be present.
FRIDAY SERVICES
There will be regular Friday
evening services at B’nai Is
rael Synagogue, according to
Rabbi S. A. Friedman. His sub
ject will be “A Little Prais
ing Now and Then is Good For
All.”
COMMITTEE MEETING
The executive committee of
the WSCS of Grace Methodist
church will meet at 10 o’clock
Friday morning at the church.
All officers and circle leaders
are urged to be present.
HOME ON FURLOUGH
Aviation radioman 2-C Conree
T. Fisher has arrived home
from overseas and is spending
a 30-day leave with his paretns
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Fisher,
2900 Princess street road. He
saw action in the central Paci
fic area, namely Woyjie,Millie,
Maleolap and Jaluit.
MARRIAGE LICENSE
Larry E. Harrell, Ivanhoe
and Miss Bonnie Brower, Ivan
hoe were issued a license to
marry yesterday by the Reg
ister of Deeds here.
SCOUT MEETING
The January meeting of dis
trict committee Boy Scout
leaders in Wilmington will be
held this evening at the Cham
ber of Commerce offices in the
Woodrow Wilson Hut it was an
nounced last night byW.Eugene
Edwards, district commission
er. Committee projects for the
coining year will be discussed.
- *
WILL OPEN CLASS
A Nurse’s Aide class will be
opened at James Walker Me
morial hospital, beginning Jan
uary 28 at 9:30 a.m., Mrs.
Sandy Marks, chairman of the
Red Cross Nurse’s Aides,
announced yesterday. The class
will be held from 9:30 to 11:30
a.m. daily except Saturday,
with Miss Augusta Futchs as
instructor. Mrs. Marks term,
ed the need for Nurse’s Aides
very urgent.
REBECCA MEETING
The regular meeting of Re
becca Degree, IOOF, will be
held tonight at eight o clock
in the IOOF building at which
time Tecently elected officers
for the new year will be install
ed. Prior to the meeting, mem
bers will be entertained at a
supper honoring the winning
group in a recent attendance
and membership contest. Sup
per will be served at 6:30
p. m.
ON DUTY
Red. Cross Staff assistants
on duty yesterday were: Mrs.
W. T. Weaks, Custom house;
and Mrs. Ernest S. Haile,
and Mrs. M. I. Porter, in the
Trust building.
NOVELTY BROADCAST
For the first time here th»
“March of Dimes” Ball will
be broadcast giving a descrip
tion of “who’s present,” “what’s
doing,” and “why,” given by
the “Round the Town Report
er.” The ball is scheduled for
Thursday ni'fht, January 31,
at the Cape Fear Armory with
Camp Lejeune dance band fur
nishing the music. Tickets went
on sale yesterday afternoon,
according to Lt. John Bandi,
chairman, and will sell for $2.50
per couple including tax. Ad
mission at the door will be $3,
including tax.
LEGION DANCE SERIES
The regular week-end dance
sponsored by Wilmington Post
~ORIENT LODGE I
NO. 395 |
A. F. & A. N.
Special Communication Thurs
day evening, Jan. 24th at 7:30.
Fellowcraft Degree
Members urged to attend. Vis
itors cordially invited.
By order of the Master.
W, H. McCLAIN,
Sec’y. j
LADIES!
Don’t Throw Your Old Shoes
Away ’Cause Our . . .
INVISIBLE SOLING, DYE
ING and REFINISHING
SERVICES
—Will Make Them Wear,
Feel and Look As Good As
New!
COMPLETE
SATISFACTION
GUARANTEED
Big Ike
SHOE REPAIR CO.
SAM L. HOUSTON
114 Princess St.
No. 10, American Legion will
be held Friday evening at 8:30
in the American Legion home
on Third street. Music will be
furnished by Virgil West and
bis orchestra.
RELIGIOUS CENSUS
March 3, is the date set aside
to begin the city-wide religious
census, officials in charge, an
nounced yesterday.
Life of Christ to be shown here;
Local minister states plans for
coping with current juvenile
problem.
The complete Life Story of Jesus
Christ. “The World’s Greatest Passion
Play,” with sound, will be shown on the
scir®en at Thalian Hall on Monday
night, Feb. 4, at 8 p. m. Tickets are
now on sale at Hall’s Castle Street
Drugstore and Stanleys Jewelers. Adult
^mission is $1.00 plus federal tax, and
children under twelve 50 cents plus
federal tax. You may dial 9719 to have
tickets delivered to your home or pjace
of business.
The Adventurers For Christ, local
church youth organization, is sponsoring
the project in the interest of a new
building program designated to erect a
new and modern church plant in Wil
mington with elaborate facilities for
youth training and recreational programs,
irrespective of individual denominational
preferences.
Rev. James R. Lee, leader of the group
repeated appeals of Juvenile
authorities to church and civic leaders
tl®ve, reached us and we are moving
ahead with plans to capture for Christian
training and service the youth who might
otherwise become feed for the penal mills
of vice that are grinding to dust our
Christian society.
“The church must find color and at
traction sufficient to break the mass
march of youth down the hellward path.
Our sons and daughters are being sur
rendered to the night clubs and taverns
without a fight. We want a religious
program in the community that offers
adventure and real life romance to our
youth. Seeing this greatest of all motion
pictures will be a part of your contribu
tion toward this achievement. Bring the
entire family.
M
F invisible I
| HALF SOLES
A • • • makes your A
A old shoes like new!
A Bring Yours W
pH To Us Today; w||
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I Work At A
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Little Joe
SHOE REP Ain
HERBERT S. KING
115 So. Front St.
Dial 7524
Dial 2-3311 For Newspaper Service -
BOUFFQNT |
*
For all fine fabrics,
cotton, silk, rayon, ny
lon, etc. Washes gar
ment like new. Try it.
BESTEX
KITCHEN TOWELS
0 for
Soft, pre, laundered, highly ab
sorbant. Makes glassware
sparkle.
SMART PLASTIC
RAINCOATS
$7.95
Belted style in green, rose, blue, tam
coral, red and clear. Water proof, non
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15 INCH I
MENS RUBBER BOOTS I
$/j..50 I
Sizes 6 to 9 Even Sizes Only I ,

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