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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, February 07, 1946, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1946-02-07/ed-1/seq-3/

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NAZIS PILFERED
ART COLLECTION
NUERNBERG, Germany, Feb.
^Pi—The Germans stole 736
e dg'nt train loads of art in wes"
n Europe, including paintings,
,er. books, sculpture and jewelry,
v French prosector told the in
^ational military tribunal to
^mirthering the war crimes trial
■nst 22 ranking Nazis, the
{•tench charged that the Germans
"(intended that such seizures
cwld be considered merely an in
nity for “sacrifices made in
L struggle against jewry.”
Charles Gertoffer, the prosecu
said Germany established an
hr looting staff under Alfred Ro
mberg, which frequently concen
I-a*ed its entire attention upon
collecting for Hermann Goering.
5, said the Germanst required
jM36 freight cars to haul away
L loot from western Europe.
j>jeld Marshal Welhelm Keitew,
joanhim von Ribbentrop and Ar
(>,jr seySs-Inquart all were accus
ed of primary responsibility for
pillage. All are in the prison
ers' dock.
pial 2-3311 For Newspaper Service
YOUR WILMINGTON TODAY
Econmic Survey Shows
‘Empire Gateway* Here
Of articles* pre“nts*hc fourth in the informative series
initiated hi S!scfi?lnK |hc steps-public and behind-the-scenes
tona str«nJ*t *««c a?d governmental leaders to insure Wilming
South F?h£...Position in the ever-expanding economy of the new
financialnrl" .arV.Cle‘ discussed Industrial Properties, Inc., the
Its future0™!??1 jaVi°n landing ready to express a city’s faith in
wanting dollar-and-cent investments in worthy enterprises
FponniSii°¥\I?CVc here» and also of an unique civic group, the
Industry C*h>eVeloPment committee, whose function is to put before
manufartiir?rre*0UIfes and Potentialities the city offers the alert
Mmm?nte. wanHn* *® expand or re-locate. Today’s article
sur^l % highlights of the Economic and Industrial
for CUy Planning board by George W. Simons,
economyJ^Editor*U**an* a°d an ontstanding analyst of the South’s
R NOBLE, Staff Writer
What does Wilmington have to offer a prospective
manufacturer?
., supply the -answer without guesswork—and hence
the only kind of an answer a worthwhile prospect would
accept—the city’s Planning board in January, 1945, retained
George W. Simons, Jr., a Jacksonville, Fla., planning con
sultant of high reputation and a recognized economic ana
lyst whose reputation extends well beyond the regional
limits of the South.
His Economic and Industrial Survey has been completed
xxxuiueill US CUIl
tent is being studied by tht
Economic Development com
mittee for early translation
into the purpose for which it
was compiled: to lay before
manufacturers conscious that the
No. 1 economic opportunity in the
United States today lies below the
Mason and Dixon line.
What does the report show, and
how it can best be inplemented?
It is not the report of this ar
ticle, or subsequent ones relating
to the Simons report, to enumerate
on a word-for-word basis the vol
ume of statistical data the con
sultant and his staff compiled. As
to deriving the most of the findings
the Simons report makes crystal
clear, the Economic Development
committee, the City Planning
board and the City council are in
agreement: retain a full-time City
Industrial Agent whose job it will
be to put before prospective manu
facturers the information to be
found in Simons’ report.
In terms of geographical lo
cation and considering the port
versified to produce many more
finished products and thereby help
compensate for the current de
ficiency in the production of con
sumer goods in the South. In this
region are many enterprising,
growing cities, each of which will
contribute its share to the develop
ment of the region and it* tribu
tary port of Wilmington . , , the
buying income of the several
counties in the aggregate approxi
mated 2.5 billion dollars in 1944.
“Not only will this region con
tinue to grow ar.d develop but all
regions adjacent and contiguous to
it will grow and develop, creating
increasing demands for products
and goods. According to current
reports, the nation will launch into
an enlarged home building pro
gram estimated at a million
homes per year, which will re
quire lumber, furniture and other
accessories. Wilmington is the
logical gateway through which
much of this business fhould
Dow. ,
An area comprising more than
3,000,000 population with a buying
income in 1944 of 2.5 billion dol
lars should be of considerable in
the trend that is today sending
whole industries in less-favored
parts of the country into the na
tion’s No. 1 economic opportunity
—the South.
Within inis tributary area, as
Simons chooses to call it, lies tre
mendous natural resources wait
ing to be manufactured into com
modities for mass trade through
out not only the United States, but
throughout the "world as well.
Within it, too, are manufactured
products worth hundreds of mil
lions of dollars annually, most of
which are consumed outside of the
south. Wilmington’s port, with its
preferential freight rates and easy
accessibility by land and air, is
the natural funnel through which
much of it might travel.
A second area, Simons found in
his studies here, lies within the
retail merchandising radius of the
city. It embraces 16 North and
South Carolina counties— Bladen,
Brunswick, Columbus, Cumber
land, Duplin, Jones, New Han
over, Onslow, Pender, Robeson,
Sampson and Scotland in North
Carolina, and Marlboro, Dillon,
Marion and Horry in South Caro
lina.
It is an area of 10,796 square
miles, and in 1940 had a popu
lation of 576,000, divided 92,856
urban, and 483,152 rural. The war
years increased the population to
an estimated 583,000, and, as the
survey points out, not a single
county in this market area lost
population during the decade of
1930-1940 when there was a gener
al migration from southern rural
counties to the North and urban
Quick Riutr of ;
CHa SORE THROAT OR
HOARSENESS
DUE TO COLDS
DUST OR FUMES
cUftend ok
i_
FINE I
WATCH I
repairing!
Workmanship I
Guaranteed B
Delivery in week S
to 10 days. H
DAVID'S!
JEWELER I
7 North Front $t. B
often improved by regular
with these twin helps
_.<£ 0* I uni OINTMENT
RESIN U Land SOAP
Prompt Rollof
Emollient, mildly
medicated Cnticura
Ointment soothes
promptly, starts at
once to help heal.
Stays on the skin.
At your druggist’s.
CUTICURA OINTMENT
_______e
REPEAT
SALE'
(Qf ©ur Clnnual
EARLY SPRING
CLEAN-UP
ofinal Clean-Up
DRESSES
$3o°
Values to $24.98
Another of those crowd bringing dress events that make
Wahl's famous for values! Every dress is fresh and new as a
daisy—(no old fashions are ever permitted to accumulate here!)
Dresses for every occasion, through Spring and Summer.
cUncil Qlean-\lp
COATS and SUITS
$10 00
,
Values to $39.95
coals and suits are arriving faster than we have room
°i’ them—so—we’re picking out a fine selection of earlier
^rivals for this clean-up event! Sizes for Juniors—Misses—
rjna Women!
I
i
— ■ ■—--*1
HOMMA ADMITS
BATAAN GUILT
MANILA, Feb. 6—(JPj—Lt. Gen.
Masaharu Homma acknowledged
today that he issued the orders
for the Bataan death march, and
that he knew 100 U. S. and Filipino
war prisoners were dying daily at
notorious Camp O’Donnell.
The suave conqueror of Bataan
and Corregidor, subjected to cross
examination at his war crimes
trial, paused solemnly after a flur
ry of prosecution questions and
declared:
“I am morally responsible for
anything that occurred under my
command.”
Under direct examination ear
lier in the day, Homma had testi
fied he never had heard of the trek
from Bataan to O’Donnell, on
which 17,200 prisoners died, until
he surrendered to American au
thorities in Tokyo last Sept. 15.
Then Col. Frank Meek, Caldwell,
Idaho, chief of the prosecution
staff which hopes to send Homma
to the gallows, took over.
“You knew you had 70,000 pri
soners of war at the fall of Ba
taan?”
“Yes.”
You knew you had issued an
order for them to march from
Balanga (on Bataan) to San
Fernando (en route to O’Don
nell?”)
“Yes,” Homma replied.
Meek then drew from the Jap
anese general the admission he
had not inquired into the physical
condition of the prisoners of war,
although he considered their treat
ment "an important matter.”
Homma is charged before a U.
S. military commission with
responsibility for the deaths of
67,000 American and Filipinos dur
ing 1942.
Bees seldom visit red flowers
because these insects are blind to
red.
center*. He call* it a *ign of good
health, economically.
The market, or retail area, has
an economy predominately agri
cultural in nature—and an aggre
gate buying power of $317,758,000.
Summarizing the are a, the
Simon* report *ay«:
**. . . the Wilmington trade area
I* a fast growing and developing
one (a growth of 85,000 from 1930
1940), possessed of rich natural re
sources responsive to further ex
ploration and development . . .
thi* area is worthy of every con
sideration the economic influences
of Wilmington can extend to it. In
this area having, nearly 00 per cent
of it* land under cultivation and
producing about $50,000,000 of to
bacco annually, there is also a di
versification of manufacturing en
terprise producing a product
valued at $52,000,000 (timber and
pulpwood—ED.). It is an area that
belong* to Wilmington because
Wilmington can service it better,
quicker and to greater advantage
than any other point. To achieve
a position of commercial domi
nance in this area, however, the
business interests of Wilmington
must be able to serve and pro
duce to such a degree that people
and interests in the tributary area
will have an eager desire to visit
and trade in Wilmington. .
Having outlined the two major
areas—tributary and marketing—
which Wilmington can serve, and
in turn be served, Simons lists
seven factors comprising Wilming
ton’s economy. He lists them in
the following manner:
1. — Transportation (port, rail
highways and air).
2. — Agriculture (truck and
bulbs; cattle, dairying, tobacco, I
cotton, etc.).
3. — Forests (wood products,
lumber, pulp, furniture and plas !
ticjtf.
—'-ommerciai uocat trade and
distribution and activities in the
market area).
5-— Service facilites (banking,
professional, mechanics, amuse-!
ments, hotels, etc.).
6. — Manufacturing (textiles,!
furniture, foods and plastics).
7. — Cultural and recreational
In terms of geographical lo
cation, and considering the Port
(beaches, educational, sports and
churches and music).
Around this seven-point econo
my, the consultant says, Wilming
ton must build for the future. He
holds tenaciously to the theory
1hat Wilmington is the logical cen
ter for a well-balanced North Car
olina economy because of its port
and proximity to a land of plenty
fairly bursting with potentialities.
His chapters on the tax struc
ture of Wilmington, New Hanover
county and the state of North Car
olina show by black-and . white
figures that few places the country
through have more inducement in
that field for the consideration of
the manufacturer or industrialist.
Wilmington’s economy, he says,
is stable and sufficiently diversi
fied to grow within its existing
pattern wthout threat of un
balancing by influx of new indus
tries, even if duplicating, indus
tries already established here.
To one familiar with Wilming
ton today, a study of Simons’ re
port suggests that only bold imag
ination and bold action are neces
sary to bring into being a Wil
mington of a 100,000 population, or
r#ore. Certainly the resources to
sustain such a population, or one
even much greater, are at the
city’s door.
The key to that door is the port.
In Sunday’s fifth article of this
series, the past, present and poten
tial future of Wilmington’s greatest
single asset—the port—will be dis
cussed in detail, presenting many
of the Simons findings on that sub
ject, as well as others pertinent to
it.—Editor.
----y u,
BREAKS UP IN ALASKA GALE
i
The passenger liner Yukon, shown here at her dock broke in
half after running aground about 40 miles south of Seward, Alas
ka, during a raging blizzard. Mountainous seas hampered the ef
forts of rescue ships standing by to remove the 371 passengers and
124 members of the crew aboard the stricken ship.
GVs Aboard Battered
Ship Prove Real Mettle
EDITOR’S NOTE: The fol
lowing is an eyewitness ac
count of the liner Yukon’s dis
aster on the reefs of John
stone’s Bay. It was related by
the manager of the Standard
Oil company office at Seward,
who was a passenger.
BY W. C. ERWIN
As told to the United Press
SEWARD, Alaska, Feb. 6.—tU.R)—
The 280 GI’s aboard the shattered
Yukon were real soldiers.
Mary of them stood in water
waist deep for 40 hours awaiting
rescue. I never once heard a
complaint.
One of them told me:
,’I have a buddy on Okinawa,
and from what he’s told me it was
a hell of a lot worse than this.”
The crew and the women and
children behaved like veterans too.
Little five-year-old blond Mike
Shaer was one of the children low
ered info a rescue boat at the start.
I guess his mother never expected
to see him again. She turned him
over to another women who had
been told to get into the boat. Then
she had to await her turn.
There wasn’t a peep or a cry
from, Mike. He just sat up straight
in the dory, and when one of die
sailors tried to reassure him, he
looked him straight in the eye and
said: “I’m all right ... but bring
mother off the boat as soon as you
can.”
They met on the street in Seward
one day later.
Most of the women and children
got off the Yukon before she broke
in half.
The break in the ship appeared
first as a four-inch crack just in
front of the smokestack. This
widened rauidly as the waves beat
the stern. and finally broke it off
and rolled it over.
Almost everybody by that time
had crowded into the bow, many
clinging to the rails, and the gun
mount in die forecastle.
Then one huge wave smashed
out a length of deck railing and
the ladder leading to the upper
deck. About 28 persons were
washed overboard, bubt I managed
to hang onto a stanchion.
Ten of those carried away, I be
lieve, fwere lost.
MORAL: DON’T SMACK
INTO JUDGE’S AUTO
IT’S BAD BUSINESS
Motorists, at least some mo
torists, are no respecters of
persons. But when you run
into the fender of-Yes, of
all people, the Judge’s Pack
ard, that changes everything.
That is exactly what happen
ed to Philip H. Bumby, Route
2, Wilmington, this afternoon,
police reports show.
Bumby who was traveling
west on Market street in a
Ford roadster, struck the right
front fender of Judge H. Win
field Smith’s Packard club
coupe doing considerable dam
age to the latter’s car.
There on the spot Bumby is
reported, to have accepted full
responsibility and promised to
pay all damages on the Judge’s
Packard. The car in which
Bumby was riding was not
damaged, and there were no
arrest, police said.
WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH
CLERK ISSUES THREE
BUILDING PERMITS
Three building permits for the
town of Wrightsville were issued
this week by R. L. Benson, city
clerk. Estimated cost of building
covered by the permits was $16,
500/
The permits included' grant to a
request by W. F. Brown, 757 South
Lumina to make repairs to a
dwelling estimated to cost $750.
Albert F. Perry for general re
pairs to his dwelling at 11, Fayette
ville street to cost about $500.
P. I. Clevenger, 1 Shearwater
street, $100 reports to his building.
L. B. 1/lcCormick $50 for minor
repairs.
Two other buildings are con
tained in permits issued so far this
week. They are being constructed
by H. E. Trask, 905 Lumina ave
nue, and his brother, Raeford
Trask, 901 Lumina avenue. Es
timated cost of the two buildings
was placed at $15,000.
“UNBIOCK”^
DIGESTIVE TRACT
And Stop Dosing Your Stomach
With Soda and Alkalizers
Don’t expect to get real relief from
headache, sour stomach, gas and bad
breath by taking soda and other alka
lizers if the true cause of your trouble ia
constipation.
In this case, your real trouble is not in
the stomach at all. But in the intestinal
tractwhere80% ofyourfoodis digested.
And when it gets blocked it fails to
digest properly.
What you want for real relief is not
soda or an alkalizer—but something to
“unblock” your intestinal tract. Some- .
thing to clean it out effectively—help
Nature get back on her feet.
Get Carter’s Pills right now. Take
them as directed. They gently and effec
tively "unblock” your digestive tract.
This permits your food to move along
normally. N ature’s own digestive juices
can then reach it. You get genuine relief
that makes you feel really good again.
Get Carter’s Pills at any drugstore—
25*. “Unblock” your intestinal tract for
real relief from indigestion.
^thought all razor
blades were fhe same...
ihen I discovered
PAL HOLLOW GROUND"
If you’ve been trying one blade after an
other, searching for the better shave, gel
a pack of Pals today. See if you don’t agree
that "This is it!’’
Ordinary safety razor blades are ground
like a pocket knife. Pal Blades are dif
ferent—tiiey’re Hollow Ground just like
a barber’s razor. *
Result: Pal Blades are flexible in your
tazor—follow facial contours effortlessly..
Tour shave is cool, quick, no "bearing
down”. And delicate edges last longer,
too. That’s why millions call it the Pal
- •
Gov. Cherry Attends
Housing Conference
RALEIGH, Feb. 6.—(U.R)_Gov.
Gregg Cherry is in Washington to-1
day where he is conferring with;
North Carolina’s delegation ’re-;
garding the housing situation in
the state, his office announced.
John Harden, Cherry's secre
tary, said that the governor would
discuss a number of state matters
wi.h the representatives, and that1
e sta*e s acute housing problem
was tops among the subjects.
VOTE ON MOVIES
GREENVILLE, S. C., Feb. 6
^-Lity council voted last night to
call a special election on the
question of the continuance of
bunday movies here. There was
an even councilman vote on the
f -
THKKg
motion to hold the election and
Mayor C. Freed McCullough ea»*
the deciding ballot for it.
Dial 2-3311 For Newspaper Service
HEADACHE
Capudine contain* 4 *pecially
■elected ingredient* that work
together to giee quick relief
from headache and neuialgu.
Follow direction* «a label.
SEE OUR 194® < '
MOTOROLA RADIOS
NOW ON DISPLAY
B. CURB, Jeweler I!
264 N. Front St. ; ;
Back Again! Just Like The Old Days!
A REGULAR PARADE OF
BABY FURNITURE
—IN OUR BABY DEPARTMEKr
(FIRST FLOOR BALCONY)
BABY
CARRIAGES
By
—Haywood-Wakefield
—Lloyd —Welch
sjg.ooto $3| ,oo
HAYWOOi)- .
WAKEFIELD
STROLLER
For Older Children
$19.25
FAMOUS
THAYER
Folding Coach
$34.75
ALL METAL
STROLLERS
$12.00
Popular Priced
HIGH
CHAIRS
$3.95 lo $11.50
Also Beautiful
BLANKETS
At Popular Price#
L_ y_ _I
Ohe-lwo ..... i:i.:ec way
HI-CHA1HS
$10.35 to $21.99
• BABY BEDS • PLAY PENS
• TRAINING CHAIRS • WATER
REPELLANT MATTRESSES
• HAMPERS # PLAY PEN PADS
• CHILDRENS ROCKERS
Now On Display In Our Show Window
Many of the Outstanding Entries in the
Community Health Week
“Poster Contest”
| Submitted by Students Of New Hanover High School i
t‘
I

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