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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, May 18, 1946, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1946-05-18/ed-1/seq-5/

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EDWARD SACHS'
Ulornifiig Watch
i=== i
$65 and $90
Look at it this way. When the war broke Joe Smith
was 22 years of age. He had always wanted to play pro
fessional baseball. The way he had it figured out, he would
start off in Class D baseball, work up the chain and attempt
to break in the major leagues. If he couldn’t make it in
four or five years he would, in all probability leave baseball. .
• • • •
! hen war broke out and he received that happy paper
from the W hite House via a local selective service board.
Maybe he thought of a fast train to the wilds of Mexico
or maybe he enlisted. What eyer the reason, he entered
service and gave three, two or four years of his life to
Uncle Sam.
• • • •
When he got out he still wanted to play baseball arf
he knew that he would, unless he was a Grady Hatton, have
to start at tne bottom in Class D baseball again. But the
situation was a little different. He was now two or three
years older and two or three years in the life of an athlete
is a little different than two or three years in the life of
a bookbinder, lawyer or sports editor. An athletes' earning power
will decrease once he passes 35 years of age where in most profes
sions a man s earning power should keep on increasing until he is
50 or over.
ff A!! and even thou*h his UvinK expenses were
greater .hem ay ha vemarried some girl who used to be hostess
=■ a,lS? yuhfVv snaS*ed by that girl back home.
ST/J, }* "I01-* money ^ feeep a man in his
mlddie twenties content than is necessary for a youngster fresh
out of high school or college.
But Class D salaries are not going to push anybody into the
higher income tax brackets. And although he would rather play
baseball than almost anything else, it still is a hard fight.
But it seems our Congress when it wasn't campaigning or
listening to Sen. Bilbo, passed a very good piece of legislation,
the GI Bill of Rights. Under this bill there was a provision for
on the job training, a program whereby GI’s learning a trade
would be helped by subsistence payments by the Federal govern
ment.
No one ever thought of ball players when they started to install
the program; it was intended more for the manual trades. But ball
players were drafted just like bookbinders, countermen and print
ers. There was no reason why “on-the-job-training,” shouldn’t apply
for baseball players.
• « • •
Thursday, the Jackson, Mississippi, ball club of the South
eastern league placed 18 World War II veterans on the team
roster under the program. Fred Holderfield, Veterans’ Admini
stration contact representative at Jackson, said the veterans
will be given the same training offered to players who are not
war veterans but who are attempting to increase their skill to
qualify for the major leagues.
Under the arrangement, single war veterans will receive $65 a
month and married vets $90 a month subsistence payments from the
federal government so long as their salaries plus the government pay
ments does not exceed the salary of similar players in the big
leagues.
This program seems to us to be tailored for Tobacco State league
clubs. We would imagine that veterans of World War II make up 90
per cent of the players.
If the Pirates, Leafs or Spinners wanted to install the pro
gram they wonld have to follow this procedure. Qualify their club
under the program with state headquarters. Have each Worltf
War II veteran who wished to he included under the program pre
sent his honorable discharge to the local VA director and there
you are.
We are convinced that the program would keep a lot of young
men in baseball who can’t afford to stay in the sport because of the
necessary low salary payments in the lower classified leagues. We
hope that the owners of the Tobacco State league clubs, President J.
E. L. Wade and for that matter all minor league clubs take the
Jackson plan under advisement.
AMATEUR ACTION
Patton, McNair Play Off
For Carolina Golf Crown
WINSTON-SALEM, May 17—Off*)
— Billy Joe Patton, the smooth golf
ing youngster from Morganton, and
Jimmy McNair, of Aiken, S. C.
will meet tomorrow in the 36-hole
match for the Carolina’s Golf As
sociation amateur championship, at
the Forsyth Country club.
Patton, as steady as the grand
father clock on the mantle, de
feated Howard Hall, of Columbia,
3 and 2, and McNair, winning from
Charlie Dudley, of Greenville, S.
C., 6 and 5, gained their places
in the finals today.
They will tee-off in the morning
Hth holes of play at 10 o’clock and
meet in the afternoon at 2 o’clock.
Patton had to ride at the crest
of his game, playing par for the
last eighteen holes, to defeat stub
born-fighting Hall, conqueror oi
favorite "Hub” Covington in the
semi-finals Thursday afternoon.
McNair, sweeping into an 8-up
lead in the morning round, held his
advantage to defeat Dudley, clos
ing out the match on the sixteenth
of the afternoon play.
Both matches were jammed with
brilliant golf and was witnessed
by a large crow of spectators.
Patton gained a one-up lead on
the first nine of the morning round
and increased it to two up at
eighteen. Patton posted a medal
card of 71 while Hall had 75.
Slammin’ Sam Takes
Texas Tourney Lead
FORT WORTH, Tex., May 17
W1—Sam Snead, of Hot Springs,
'a., snot a one-under par 69 today
to take the lead at the half-way
Jfiark in tre Colonial National
Invitation golf tournament. One of
the four players able to better or
'Qnal pai on the tough 6,y52-yard
Colonial Country Club course to
day. Snead had 140 at the end oi
36 holes.
tn a tie for second place was
George Schnecter, Ogden, Utah,
yesterday's leader who had a 74 to
day; Harry Todd, of Dallas, who
“!°L a 70. and Herman Heiser, of
won Ohio, who registered a 69.
the e three had totals of 141.
Since the Japanese surrender, a
olal of 3366 long tons of crude
rubber have been exported from
1T° Xetherlands East Indies.
BOATS NOW IN STOCK!
anchor HARDWARE CO.
/font and Dock Sts. Dial 5943
Complete Line
BASEBALL and SOFTBALL
GLOVES
PICKARD’S
j09 Market St. Dial 2-3224
DETROIT TIGERS
DEFEAT A’S, 3-1
AMERICAN AT DETROIT
PHILADELPHIA AB R H O A
Valo, rf -.— 4 0 11?
Kell, 3b _ 3 1 2 ® J
McQuinn, lb_ 4 0 1 1© ®
Chapman, cf_ 4 0 0 z “
Rosar, c _ 4 0 0 3 1
Derry, If _ 3 0 0 X S
xPeck _ 1 0 J ? S
Hall, 2b _ 3 0 i X r
xxStainback - 1 ® J ” ,
Wallaesa, ss - 3 ® * „ r
xxx Suder _ 1 ® ® ® "
Marchildon, p - 3 ® ® ® ,
xxxx Armstrong — 1 0 ® _ _
TOTALS_ 35 1 8 24 1)
x—Batted for Derry in 9th.
xx—Batted lor "Hall in 9th
xxx—Batted lor Wallaesa in
xxxx—Batted for Marchildon in snn.
DETROIT AB R ? „ ,
Lake, ss _ 4 2 1 ° 3
Mayo, 2b- 4 0 2 4 1
Cramer, cf _ 3 ® ® . .
Moore, If - 4 ® ® l ?
Cullenbine, lb- 2 0 ® * '
Mullin, rf _ 3 0 0 3 0
Outlaw. 3b _ 3 0 3 * „
Swift, c _ 3 ° 0 ® ®
Trucks, p _ 3 1112
TOTALS _ 29 3 5 27 8
PHILADELPHIA_ 000 100 000—1
DETROIT ___ 000 100 02x—3
Errors— Outlaw, Mayo, Hall 2. Runs
batted in— McQuinn, Mayo 2, Cramer.
Two base hits— Kell 2, Mayo. Sacrifices—
Cramer, Kell. Double plays— Lake, Mayo
and Cullenbine. Left on bases— Phila
delphia 8, Detroit 4. Base on balls— oft
Marchildon 1. Strikeout*— Marchildon
3, Trucks 4. Umpires— Hubbard, Weafer
and Berry. Time— 1:47. Attendance—
8,079.

There were 25,519,000 cows on j
farms of the United States in 1945. I
Rocky Mount’s Bell Faces Wildcats Today
New Hanover, Birds Clash
In Crucial^ Stadium Game
By GENE WARREN
Star Sports Writer
No-hit “Bo” Bell of Rocky Mount will try and silence the
Eastern Conference leading New Hanover Wildcats today at Legion
Stadium, when the visiting Blackbirds invade Wilmington at 3:30.
iveroros snow mat ine last time
■JHHS won a baseball championship
was in 1929. For the last two years
he Cats have finished near the
jottorrl of the standings.
Coach Leon Brogden will have a
jrilliant achievement if the Wild
:at nine which won two and lost
en last year, takes the mythical
itle Brogder.’s Wilsonians walk
sd of: with the North Carolina high
school pennant ir> the 1945 season
The game today at the stadium
s expected to draw one of the larg
:st crowds ever to see a high school
contest in Wilmington, as both
lines, especially Wilmington, are
inder pressure.
Brogden remained silent over his
starting pitcher, Keeping W. A.
Brown, Herman Vick, and Kenneth
Rogers as his moundsmen to choose
!rom. One of these lads has a big
task ahead of him to stop the hard
litting Blackbirds.
Playing on their home diamond,
iVilmington may have a slight ad
vantage, bui it must be remember
ed that they practice at Thirteenth
and Ann field, ana are as unfami
liar with the Legion diamond as
the visitors. Rocky Mount’s grass
infield may hamper the Blackbird
play, but their smooth work there
in t.ie first meeting between the
two nines saw Joe Caruso’s crew
display the best defense in the
league.
A review of the first Rocky
Mount-Cat battle reveals that Wil
mington made six errors, while the
Blackbirds committed one miscue.
Since then Erogden has used a
new second baseman, Paul Horton,
at the keystone. He has also for
that position Fitzhugh Fennell.
J. C. Price and Billy Hardison
guard the left side of the infield,
while Kenneth Rogers has the up
per hand to start at first base.
The meadow crew of New Han
over will be chosen from Louis
Collie, ‘Bubba” Sykes, Fennell, Jim
Gibson, Donald Edwards, and Her
man Vick, if Vick doesn’t pitch.
The Rocky Mount coach, Joe
Caruso, is certain to put Bell on
the mound. Tnis boy struck out 16
Rale.gn players, walked none, and
allowed no hits Wednesday night.
Against Wilmington he was touch
ed for seven hits, and only whif
fed four batters.
If Wilmington wins today they
will take on the Western Confer
ence champion for the state crown.
If the 'Cats lose, they go into a
three-way tie for the Eastern Con
ference championship.
Probable lineups:
ROCKY MOUNT WILMINGTON
Lanier, cf - Horton, 2b
Williamson, c.Hardison, 3b
Denson, ss .„ Price, ss
Cockrell lb . Vick, rf, p
Bell, p .... —. Fennell, cf
Etchison, 2b .. Collie, If
McLamb, rf.K. Rogers, lb, p
Hooks, 3b .. M. Rogers, c
Fowler, If .. Brown, rf, p
Blue Devils Enter 32
In Circuit Track Meet
DURHAM May 17.—(/P)—Favor
ed Duke university will enter 32
men in the 21st running of the
southern conference outdoor track
meet tomorrow at Chapel Hill, but
only three all-time university rec
ords stand a chance to be better
ed.
Two Blue Devils, Roger Neigh
borgsli and Terry Maxwell, will
have an opportunity to set new uni
versity marks in the 220-yard dash,
440-yard sprint, and 880-yard run.
Neighborgall is only two seconds
off the best 680 time set by Char
lie Bradsher in 1933. The Fresh
man middle distance star was
clocked ini. 57.7 against North
Carolina last week. If NeighborgalJ
can cut his 4*0 pace by nine-tenths
of a second, he will tie the time
of Werner Brown who sprinted
the distance in 48.6 in 1941.
The time of John Brownlee, 1933
star for the Blue Devils, is six
tenths of a second better than Max
well’s 21.8 mark in the 220 yard
dash this season. Maxwell also
scored his best, time against the
Tar Heel in dua! competition last
weex.
DODGERS SLUG
HARD IN 16-6 WIN
NEW YORK, May 17—(£*)— The
Brooklyn Dodgers raked six Pitts
burgh pitchers for 17 hits today
to overwhelm the Pirates 16 to 6
and climb back into the National
league lead. The St. Louis Car
dinals fell to second place by los
ing to Boston.
Biggest blow of the Dodgers
barrage was Pete Reiser’s inside
the-park homer with two on in the
fourth. The runs proved to be the
deciding markersr since they over
came a 6-5 Pirate lead.
Rookie Joe Hatten gained cre
dit for the victory by limiting the
Pirates to six scattered hits after
relieving Ralph Branca with none
out in the third frame. It was
Pittsburgh’s fifth straight loss.
The fielding was ragged by both
sides. The Pirates committed six
errors and the Dodgers five, four
of them in the third inning.
Auer going aneaa on rteiser s
smash on seven hits and two Pi
rate bobbles. Nick Strincevich, sec
ond Pittsburgh curver, was charg
ed with the defeat.
NATIONAL AT BROOKLYN
PITTSBURGH AB R H O A
Cox, ss _ 5 0 1 2 I
Coscarart, ss_ 0 0 0 0 C
Brown, 3b_ 5 1111
Kiner, cf _ 3 0 0 3 S
Fletcher, lb _ 3 2 1 6 C
Gustine, 3b _ 3 112 3
Whitehead, 3b_10 10 1
Elliott, rf _ 0 0 0 0 C
Barrett, rf _ 5 0 2 2 C
Russell, If_ 5 0 0 4 C
Salkeld, c _ 110 4 1
Camelli, c _ 1 0 0 0 0
Roe, p _ 0 0 0 0 C
x Colman _ 1 0 1 0 0
Strincevich, p_ 1 1 1 0 «
Gerheauser, p_ 0 0 0 0 C
xx Handley-- 1 0 0 0 C
Wilkie, p_ 0 0 0 0 C
Hopper, p _ 0 0 0 0 f
xxx Van Robays -. 1 0 0 0 1
Lanmng, p_ 0 0 0 0 1
TOTALS_36 S 9 24 1
x—Batted for Roe in 2nd.
xx—Batted for Gerheauser in Bth.
xxx—Batted for Hopper in 8th.
BROOKLYN AB R H O A
Reese, ss _ 2 3 113
Rojek, ss- 1 1 1 0 {
Herman, 2t>_ 4 3 2 3 ]
Reiser, cf_ 5 2 3 1 C
Whitman, cf -_ 0 0 0 0 1
Walker, rf_. 5 2 3 2 C
Hermanski, rf ___ 1 0 1 1 C
Lavagetto, 3b_3 10 2 3
Ramazotti, 3b_- 2 110 1
Furillo, If _. 10 10 1
Stevens, lb_4 1 2 3 C
Galan, lb-lf_ 5 1 1 8 (
Anderson, c_1 0 0 1 t
Padgett, c _ 3 0 0 5 1
Branca, p _ 1 0 0 0 1
Hatten, p - 4 110]
TOTALS_ 42 18 17 27 i
PITTSBURGH _ 032 100 000— t
BROOKLYN __ 302 307 Olx— It
Errors— Cox 2, Anderson, Hatten 2
Lavagetto Galan, Salkeld 2, Barrett
Camelli. Runs batted in— Furillo, Col
man 3, Fletcher, Stevens 2, Kiner, Reisei
3, Walker, Galan, Hatten 2, Hermanski,
Two base hits— Fletcher, Colman, Hat
ten, Barrett. Three base hit— Furillo,
Home run— Reiser. Stolen bases— Brown,
Walker, Hatten, Reese, Hermanski, Rojek'
Sacrifice— Fletcher. Double play— Her
man, Reese anti Stevens. Left on bases—
Pittsburgh 10, Brooklyn 10. Base on balls
— off Roe 2, Strincevich 3, Wilkie 1
Branca 3, Hatten 3, Hoppe 1, Lanning 1,
Strike outs— Roe 1, Strincevich 2, Ger
heauser 1, Branca 1, Hatten 4. Hits— oil
Roe 1 in 1 inning; Strincevich 5 in 3
(none out in 4th); Gerheauser 1 in 2
Wilkie 6 in 2-3; Hopper 2 in 1 1-3; Lan
ning 2 in 1; Branca 3 in 2 (none out ir
3rd); Hatten 6 in 7. Winning pitcher—
Hatten. Losing pitcher — Strincevich
Umpires — Magerkurth, Stewart anc
Dunn. Time — 3:10. Attendance— 9,30)
(paid).
White’s Ice Cream,
Coast Line Triumpli
White's Ice Cream defeated City
Optical, 6-4 in a City softball
league game last night at Robert
Strange Park. Williams of the
Optical club led both teams at the
plate with two doubles.
In the second game, Atlantic
Coast Line licked Sunshine Laun
dry in a slugfes' 20-10. Linwood
Rowan of the Coast Liners smack
ed a homer to aid the winner’s
cause.
First planting of crested wheat
grass in Wyoming was made by
Herbert E. Sabin in 1928, near
Lusk, Wyo.
TWINS DEFEAT PIRATES, 8-4
Tobacco State
League
Box Scores
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
WILMINGTON 4, Dunn-Erwin 8.
Smithfield 6, Clinton 3.
Agnier 12, Sanford 6.
STANDINGS
Club Won Lost Pet.
Sanford _ 7 3 .700
Dunn-Erwin _ 6 3 .667
Smithfield- 6 4 .600
WILMINGTON_ 4 5 .444
Clinton .. 4 5 .444
Angier-Fuquay _ 2 7 .222
CLINTON AB R H O A
Olsen, ss - 5 0 112
Staples, 2b- 5 1 3 3 £
Smith, 3b - 3 1115
Larrieu, lb- 4 0 18 0
Jacob, lb - 10 0 10
Duke, If _ 5 13 10
Myers, cf - 5 12 10
Kampau, c_ 5 10 9 0
Holland, rf_ 4 10 10
M. Smith, rf_ 0 0 0 0 0
Keane, p - 4 0 3 1 ]
x Boyco _ 1 0 0 0 0
TOTALS_ 42 6 14 27 13
x—Batted for Larrieu in 7th inning.
SMITHFIELD AB R H O A
Fauci, ss _ 4 0 0 1 2
Woodard, rf - 5 0 10 1
Alexander, If- 5 2 12 0
Daniels, c - 4 0 0 8 0
Niezzgoda, cf_ 4 13 0 0
Ray, lb - 5 0 0 8 0
Frazier, 2b- 4 0 0 4 3
Vendetta, 3b _ 3 0 13 3
Moore, p- 3 0 0 9 1
Bird, p _ 0 0 0 1 1
z Plantz _ 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS_ 37 3 6 27 10
z—Batted for Moore in 8th inning.
CLINTON _ 000 112 200—6
SMITHFIELD _ 000 001 020—3
Errors— Olsen 1, Staples 3, Larrieu 1,
Keane 1; Fauci 1, Woodard 1, Frazier 1,
Vendetta 1, Moore 1. Runs batted in
Duke 3, Ray, Vendetta. Three base hit—
Myers. Home run— Duke. Base on balls
— off Keane 4, Moore. Strike out. by
Keane 8, Moore 7. Hits— off Moore 13 in
8 innings; Bird 1 in 1. Wnning pitcher—
Keane. Losing pitcher— Moore. Time—
j 2:20.
RELIEFER SAVES
GAME FOR YANKS
CHICAGO, May 17—(IF)—Pitcher
Randy Gumpert came to the relief
of Joe Page in the fifth inning to
day and gave up only three hits the
rest of the way to enable the New
York Yankees to defeat the Chi
cago White Sox, 4-2.
Page was breezing along with a
no-hitter when the Sox nicked him
for two runs on three hits in the
fifth after one out. Gumpert came
on the scene with two on and re
tired the side. Gumpert received
credit for the win.
Keller’s homer was his sixth of
the season and the Yanks 28th in
28 games.
AMERICAN AT CHICAGO
NEW YORK AB R H O A
Stirnweiss, 3b - 3 1113
Henrich, rf- 4 0 2 1 6
Keller, If - 5 1 1 2 f
DiMaggio, cl_ 3 0 0 2 (
Etten, lb _ 4 0 0 11 l
W. Dickey, c- 3 0 0 5 1
Gordon, 2b- 4 0 13 4
Rizzuto, ss- 4 1 1 2 (
Page, p _-_ 2 1 1 0 1
Gumpert, p - 2 0 0 0 1
TOTALS_ 34 4 7 zv u
CHICAGO AB R H O A
Tucker, cf _ 1 0 0 2 1
Hod gin, If _ 1 0 0 0 (
Kolloway, 2b- 4 0 0 1 3
Wright, rf_ 3 0 0 2 (
Appling, ss- 3 0 13 1
Jones, lb - 3 0 0 6 1
Platt, lf-cf _ 4 0 0 5 6
Kennedy, 3b - 4 13 4 2
Tresh, c _ 3 113 1
zzz Moses - 1 0 0 0 C
Dietrich, p- 1 0 0 0 l
z Curtwright_ 10 10 0
Papish, p _ 0 0 0 0 G
zz Trosky _ 1 0 0 0 C
Caldwell, p_ 0 0 0 1 1
zzzz G. Dickey_ 1 0 0 0 6
TOTALS _ 31 2 6 27 8
z—Batted for Diei i ich in 5th.
zz—Batted for Papish in 7th.
zzz—Bated for Tresh in 9th.
zzzz—Batted fir Caldwell in 9th.
NEW YORK_ 220 000 000—4
CHICAGO __ 000 020 000—2
Errors— Kolloway, Papish, Appling.
Runs batted in— Keller 2, Stirnweiss,
Henrich, Curtwright 2. Two base hits—
Tresh, Curtwright. Home run— Keller.
Stolen base— Kennedy. Sacrifice— Hen
ri-'h. Double plays— Rizzuto, Gordon and
Etten; Stirnweiss and Etten. Left on
bases— New York 8. Chicago 7. Base on
balls— Page 5, Dietrich 1, Papish 2
Caldwell 1. Strikeouts— Page 2, Gumperl
2, Papish 1, Caldwell 1. Hits— off Page
3 in 4 1-3 innings: Gumpert 3 in 4 2-3;
Dietrich 6 in 5; Papish 1 in 2; Caldwell
0 in 2. Winning pitcher— Gumpert. Los
ing pitcher— Dietrich. Umpires— Grieve
Summers and Paparelia. Time— 1:59.
Attendance— 7,909.
Cleveland Indians Halve
Two Games With Senators
CLEVELAND, May 17.— (JP) -
Fireball Bob Feller pitched five-hit,
shutout ball and struck out 14 bat
ters today as the Indians split a
double-header with Washington, 3
to 0 and 4 to 9.
AMERICAN AT CLEVELAND
(FIRST GAME)
WASHINGTON AB R H O A
Robertson, 3b _ 4 0 0 0 1
Lewis, rf - 4 0 0 3 0
Spence, cf _ 3 0 0 0 C
Vernon, lb_ 4 0 2 • 8 0
Heath, If_ 2 0 0 1 6
Travis, 3b _ 4 0 10 4
Priddy, 2b _ 4 0 0 5 3
Evans, c _ 3 0 17 1
Haefner, p_ 3 0 10 1
TOTALS_ 31 0 5 24 5
CLEVELAND AB R H O A
Case, If _ 4 0 0 2 0
Rocco, lb _ 4 113 0
Boudreau, ss _ 4 2 2 1 1
Seerey. rf _ 2 0 0 1 0
Keltner, 3b _ 4 0 12 0
Meyer, 2b _ 4 0 0 2 1
Hayes, c _ 3 0 2 14 (
Mackiewicz, cf- 2 0 0 2 *
Feller, p _ 3 0 0 0 2
TOTALS _ 30 3 6 27 4
CLEVELAND _ 100 000 02x—o
WASHINGTON _ 000 000 000—G
Errors— Robertson, I’riddy, Meyer.
Runs bated in— Keltner, Boudreau. Two
base hits— Hayes, Boudreau. Left on
bases— Washington 7, Cleveland 6. Base
on balls— off Feller 3, Haefner 3. Strike
outs— by Feller 14, Haefner 4. Wild pitch
Haefner. Umpires— McGowan and Rue
Time— 1:58. Attendance— 1,500 (est ).
WASHINGTON AT CLEVELAND
(SECOND GAME)
WASHINGTON AB R H O A
Torres, 3b _ 4 112 3
Lewis, rf _ 4 1 2 2 C
Spence, cf _ 3 2 0 1 C
Vernon, lb _ 5 2 3 6 1
Heath, If _ 2 2 0 1 0
Priddy, 2b _ 3 12 5 4
Travis, ss _ 3 0 10 3
Evans, c - 4 0 0 6 C
Masterson, p _ 4 0 0 1 0
TOTALS _ 32 9 9 24 11
CLEVELAND AB R H O A
Case, If _ 2 0 0 2 0
Woodling, cf_ 4 110 0
zz Fleming_ 1 0 0 0 0
Mills, If _ 0 0 0 2 0
Rocco, lb_ 4 114 2
Boudreau, ss_ 4 0 1 3 1
Edwards, rf _ 4 0 0 4 6
Keltner, 3b_ 3 2 2 0 2
Lollar, c _ 1 0 0 4 0
Hegan, c _ 1 0 0 3 0
Meyer, 2b _ 3 0 2 1 1
Krakauskas, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
Center, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
Black, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
z Gromek_ 1 0 0 0 0
Lemon, p _ 10 0 11
TOTALS _ 29 4 7 24 7
z—Batted for Black in 2nd.
zz—Batted for Case in 4th.
WASHINGTON _ 440 100 00~9
CLEVELAND _ 200 100 01—4
Error— None. Runs batted in— Vernen,
Priddy 3, Travis 2, Evans 2, Rocco 2,
Lemon, Keltner. Two base hits— Boud
reau, Lewis. Heme runs— Rocco, Keltner,
Double plays— Travis, Priddy and Ver
non 2; Rocco, Boudreau and Lemon,
Left on bases— Washington 10, Cleveland
7. Base on balls— Krakauskas 2, Centei
3, Masterson 6, Lemon 6. Strikeouts—
Masterson 6, Lemon 6. Hits— off Kra
kauskas 4 in 1-3 (none out in 1st); Cen
ter 2 in 1 1-3 innings; Black 0 in 1-3;
Lemon 3 in 6. Wild pitch— Black. Passed
balls— Lollar, Hegan. Losing pitcher—
Krakauskas. Umpires— Rue and Mc
Gowan. Time— 2:05, Attendance— 4,500
(estimated).
MAURIELLO KAYOES
WOODCOCK IN 5TH
NEW YORK May IV—tU.R)
Tami Mauriello’s short right up
percuts to the chin ruined Bruce
Woodcock’s American debut to
night, knocking out the British Em
pire heavyweight champion in 2:16
of the fifth round before more
than 6,000 fans in the Madison
Square Garden.
Woodcock, of Doncaster, Eng
gland, suffered the first knockout
of his career after he had taken a
severe battering from left hooks
to the head earlier in the fifth
session of the scheduled 10-round
bout.
The knockout punch came as
Woodcock lunged in with a hard
left, it missed Tami and as their
bodies came together, black-hair
ed, brawny Mauriello brought up a
terrific short uppercut that slipped
upbetweer them and exploded on
Woodcock’s chin.
Woodcock's knees buckled under
him. He dropp'd to the floor and
lay on his back as Referee Eddie
Joseph tolled the count over him.
THE SPORTS PATROL
Following In Steps Of Yankees, Cronin
Orders Air Travel In West For Red Sox
United Press Sport Writer
NEW YORK, Maj 17—(U.R)—
Manager Joe Cronin, who ad
mitted he wasn’t so hot on this
flying idea, ordered air travel
in the west for his rampaging
Boston Red Sox to prevent the
New York Yankees from gain
ing a single physical advan
tage that might affect the
stretch drive for the American
league pennant.
Cronin was in town for his
first series with the Yankees
when Larry MacFhail an
nounced his New York club
would fly for the rest of the
season.
“They’ll get their sleep for
certain now,” Cronin said.
“That could be an important
difference to us.
“Three times on western
V
trips last year the air-condi
tioning broke down on our
train and it was so hot none of
our players got any sleep.”
At that time Cronin indicated
he wasn’t much on air travel
himself. But the hustling Irish
man from San Francisco is
fighting for the flag in this
“Bed Sox year” right down the
line and the Yankees are the
club he has to beat.
Most significant note in the
Yankee flying announcement,
as far as Cronin was concern
ed, was the fact that the New
York ball club will be quar
tered in hotels every night it is
on the road.
If the Yankees got their sleep,
he figured the Red Sox had bet
ter have it too. Hence, the Red
Sox announced an air schedule
with trips from Chicago to St.
Louis, St. Louis to Detroit, and
from Cleveland to Boston.
They’ll ride the train on the
comparatively short hop from
Detroit to Cleveland.
In all, the Yankees expect to
pile up approximately 14,000
air miles, using their Yankee
mainliner on all trips except
the commuter-length trip to
Philadelphia.
The business of placin several
million dollars worth of base
ball merchandise aboard a sin
gle commercial transport prob
ably will be argued long and
hard before other baseball
magnates decide to give the
Pullmans a go-by.
Although the first Yankee trip
to St. Louis was uneventful,
they had a bit of fog trouble
- \
over Chicago on the next jump
and spent a half hour circling
before the plane captain was
ordered in. That is a common
practice, entailing little, if any,
danger, but some of the Yanks
were said to have had a trifle
more excitement than they
were looking for.
Among the recent critics of
MacPhail’s air order was Babe
Rutb, who was an expensive
piece of baseball property in
his day.
“I don’t believe they ought to
put all those ball players in an
airplane,” he said. “The risk
is too great.”
At that moment, the Babe was
poised at the top of a ladder
leading into a 054. The Babe
was flying to Mexico "for a
game of golf with the Pasquels.
BRAVES TRIUMPH
OVER CARDS, 4-1
BOSTON, May 17—(/P)—Tommy
Holmes continued his savage at
tack against the St. Louis Cardi
nals’ pitching today and his pair
of doubles plus a single paced the
Boston Braves to a 4-1 triumph.
The Tribesmen got topnotch
twirling from Johnny Sain, who,
while chalking up his fourth win
of the season, held the Cards at
bay in all but the fourth inning
and limited them to seven hits.
national at boston
ST. LOUIS AB B ? ? A,
Klein, 2b - J ® ® l
Moore, cf - * ® \ ?
Musial, If - 4 0 2 1
Slaughter, rf - 4 11a
Kurowski, 3b - *010
Sisler, lb - 4 0 0 12
Kluttz, c- 3 0 1 3
xxAdams - 1 ® ® ®
Marion, ss - 4 ® t t
Beazley, p - } n n n
xEndicott - 1 0 ? «
Barrett, p - ° 0
TOTALS_ 33 1 7 24 1(
xx—Batted for Kluttz in 9th.
x—Batted for Beazley in 7th.
BOSTON AB R H O A
Ryan, 2b- 3 0 1 2
Rowell, If - 4 2 2 2
Holmes, rf- 4 13 0
Sanders, lb - 4 0 1 10
Gillenwater, cf- 4 0 12
Masi, c - 3 0 0 8
Roberge, 3b - 3 0 0 1
Culler, ss - 3 113 1
Sain, p _ 3 0 0 1.
TOTALS_ 31 4 9 27 1(
ST LOUIS _ 000 100 000—!
BOSTON _ 001 002 Olx—
Error—Beazley. Runs batted in—K»uttz
Ryan, Holme3 2, Sanders. Two base hits
Musial, Holmes 2. Double plays— Marior
to Sisler; Sain to Culler to Sanders. Let
on bases— St. Louis 7. Boston 4. Bas<
on balls— off Beazley 1, Sain 2. Strike
outs— by Beazley 1, Barret 1, Sain 6,
Hits— off Beazley 6 in 6 innings; Bar
ret 3 in 2 innings. Losing pitcher—
Beazley. Umpires— Barlick, Pinelli and
Ballanfant. Time— 1:40. Attendance—
3,171 (paid).
AMERICAN LEAGUE
New York 4, Chicago 2.
Detroit 3, Philadelphia 1.
Cleveland 3-4, Washington 0-9.
Boston-St. Louis (PPD., Rain).
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Brooklyn 16, Pittsburgh 6.
Boston 4, St. Louis 1.
Chicago at New York (PPD., Ram).
Cincinnati at Philadelphia (night).
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Clubs W. L Pet. G.B.
Boston _ 23 6 .793 -
New York _ 18 10 .643 4 1-2
Detroit _ 16 12 .571 6 1-2
Washington _ 13 13 .500 8 1-2
St. Louis _ 13 15 .464 9 1-2
Cleveland_ 11 16 .407 11
Chicago _ 8 18 .333 12 1-2
Philadelphia _ 7 21 .250 15 1-2
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Clubs W. L. Pet. G.B.
Brooklyn _ 16 9 .460 _
St. Louis _-_ 15 9 .625 1-2
Boston _ 14 11 ,560 2
Chicago_ 12 10 .545 2 1-2
x Cincinnati _ 12 10 .545 2 1-2
New York - 11 14 .440 5
Pittsburgh _ 9 14 .391, 6
x Philadelphia - 5 17 .227 9 1-2
(x—Denotes Night Game).
PITCHER TODAY
* AMERICAN LEAGUE
New York (Bonham 2-0) at Chicagc
Grove 0-1).
Washington (Curtis 0-0) at Cleveland
(Johnson 0-0).
Philadelphia (Newsom 3-2) at Detroit
(Hutchinson 0-0).
Boston (Harris (6-0) at St. Louis (Gale
house 0-4).
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Chicago (Prim 0-2 and Fasseau 2-1)
at New York (Voiselle 2-3 and Kennedy
2-0) two games.
Pittsburgh (Heintzelman 3-1) at Brook
lyn (Head 2-0).
Cincinnati (Heusser 3-0) at Philadelphia
(Pearson 1-0).
St. Louis (Brecheen 1-4) at Boston
(Wright 2-1).
Philadelphia 4, Cincinnati 2. (night
game.)
SIX-RUN OUTBURST
DOWNFALL OF BUCS
Largest Crowd Of Season
Sees Dunn Take
League Game
DUNN, May 17.—A six-run out
burst in the second inning by the
Dunn-Erwin Twins sent Managei
Mickey Katkaveck's Wilmington
Pirates into defeat land. 8-4, here
last night before ar estimated
crowd of 2,500.
Wilmington tallied once In the
first, but the Twins came back In
their half to score twice to take the
lead and stay.
Leach, Janik and Stephenson
singled to open Dunn’s half of the
second. Fernandez-'s infield roller
was booted around by Shortstop
Strickland and two Twin runs raced
home.
Stamper, Dunn centerfielder,
greeted Dave Odom, who started
on the mound for the Pirates, with
a scorching double to right center,
sending home two more runs. The
scoring spree was ended when Snag
Allen errored Guinn’s grass cutter,
which resulted in the last two runs
in the second canto.
Going into the last of the ninth,
the Pirates blew a scoring chance
when Bob Lauffer, who can usually
be counted on to deliver with the
chips down, whiffed with the bases
jammed.
The Twins go to Wilmington to
night to play the Bucs in a return
game. The contest, scheduled to get
underway at 7:45, will be played
at Legion Stadium.
WILMINGTON AB K H U A
Strickland, 2b - 5 0 2 0 1
Fox, rf - 5 13 3 0
Allen. 3b - 4 0 114
Lauffer, 3b_ 4 0 0 10 1
Staton, c - 4 0 2 5 1
Lancester, cf-- 4 0 0 2 0
Sknner, If -- 4 113 0
Cullen, ss _- 4 2 2 0 1
Odom, p - 1 0 0 0 0
Albert, p _ 2 0 0 0 3
x Katkaveck_- 10 0 0 0
TOTALS _ 38 4 11 24 11
x—Hit for Olbert in 9th.
DUNN AB R H O A
Fernandez, ss - 4 2 114
Stamper, cf - 4 12 10
Quinn, 2b - 5 2 13 3
Bass, If_ 4 0 110
Holliday, rf - 3 0 0 1 0
Harrison. 3b - 4 0 10 3
Leach, lb _ 4 1 1 14 1
Janik, c - 4 114 0
Stephenson, p —_ 3 112 4
TOTALS _ 35 8 9 27 15
WILMINGTON _- 100 000 201—4
DUNN __ 260 000 OOx—8
Errors— Strickland 1, Cullen 1; Fer
nandez 2. Runs batted in— Staton, Quinn
3. Holliday, Stamper 2, Fox, Strickland.
Two base hits— Staton, Fernandez, Stam
pre. Cullen. Three base hit— Harrison.
Double plays— Fernandez, Quinn and
Leach: Allen, Lauffer and Allen. Base
on balls— Odom 3, Stephenson 2. Struck
out, by— Olbert 4, Stephenson 3. Hits off
—Odom 2 in 2 1-3 innings; Olbert 2 in
5 2-3. Winning pitcher— Stephenson. Los
ing pitcher— Odom. Umpires— Fragile,
Moneyhun. Time— 2:01.
YOUNGEST TRAINER
BATON ROUGE, May 17—Marty
Broussard, 25, former Louisiana
State pitcher, has been head train
er there since he was 21.
TITANS IN T PARTY
DETROIT, May 17—Prospective
football candidates at University
of Detroit are taking a refresher
course in T-formation tactics.
ROD and REEL
REPAIR SERVICE
Available At I
ANCHOR HARDWARE CO.
Front and Dock Sts. Dial 5043
NYDAR GUN SIGHTS
AT YOUR
Mass
114 MARKET '
SEE---THE NEW *
Piper Cub Super Cruiser ;
Demonstration Flights
This Afternoon & Sunday Morning
BLUETHENTHAL FIELD
The Finest Field Anywhere ^
A n organiza
tion backed by
12,000 hours
of flying.
I 26 years with
out loss or In
jury to pas
sener or stu
dent.
Pennington Flying Service
Entrance From Castle Hayne via Red Cross Hospital.
DIAL 2-1361
--,

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