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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, August 13, 1946, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1946-08-13/ed-1/seq-2/

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, MORE ABOUT
j[ AIRLINES
FROM PAGE ONE
of Knoxville, Term., Asheville,
Charlotte, Pinehurst, Southern
Pines, and Fayetteville, and the
second via Lexington, Bristol,
Winston-Salem, Greensboro, Bur
lington, Raleigh, Durham, and
Fayetteville.
To Winter Resort*
State claim* that if Pinehurst
and Southern Pines are included
on the first route these noted re
sorts will be open to speedy travel
from the midwest. The examiners’
report, however, recommended
that these resorts be made stops
only on Eastern Airlines’ Route
No. Six between Raleigh and
Columbia, S. C., to provide ad
ditional connections with eastern
points.
Seaboard claims in its brief that
“ample proof’ has shown it to
be "undoubtedly the applicant best
fitted from the standpoint of both
financial ability and experience
in air transportation” to serve
We Teach WATCHES
To Tell The Troth
EXPERT
Watch and Clock Repair
Fast Dependable Service
The JEWEL BOX
Wilmington’s Most Popnlar
Jewelry Store.
109 North Front SL
Important1
r for HOME
OARDENERS
POR safety-wash skin well
*■ after gardening with a sudsy
»oap that cleanses effectively and
agreeably. Use Resinol Soap.
To chafes, ivy poison, sunburn
,,. apply soothing Resinol Oint
ment. Feel it ease itchy burning.
RESINOLS
Mas cl Ah Ordnance Depart:
ment are given the opportunity
to train under expert supervi
sion at ona el the many
famous Ordnance training
schools. They gain valuable
training and experience which
pays off in dollars and certs in
civilian life. Ton may become
highly dolled in such subjects
as diesel engineering, electri
cal and mechanical engineer
ing, welding, sheet metal work,
riveting, handling oi explo
sives and precision machining:
Ton will last everything tram
new shells to powerful tank
«h»*eis. And while yon are
training, you will be
advantage el ail the benefits
altered under the most liberal
recruiting program ever writ
lam Step in your Hecnriting
Station today to get all the
iacta.
HEBE'S SOME GOOD NEWS
FOR ARMY VETERANS'.
■k A new regulation is in ef
fect which may qualify you
to reenlist in the grade held
at time of discharge, regard
less how long since your dis
charge.
★ Dependency allowances
•re still in effect.
—Apply At—
0. S. ARMY
Recruiting Station
Boom 203, P. O. Building
Dial 2-8368
Wilmington, N. C.
— or —
Contact Recruiting Represen
tative* in Post Offices in the
Following Towns, 10 A. M. to 2
P. M . „
Mondays—Whiteville
Tuesdays—Southport
Wednesdays—Wallace
Thursday s—Jacksonville
This Message Published in The
Interest of National Defense By
LUCKY STRIKE
BOWLING ALLEY
J. W. Smith, Owner
Located on left hand side ot
Carolina Beach Road at Maffitt
Village stop light.
TEN PINS — DUCK PINS
HERE’S SOME GOOD NEWS
FOB ARMY VETERANS!
a large part of the area which
State also seeks to cover.
Would Reach Here
Seaboard asks for certification
of its proposed Norfolk to Fayette
ville route as well as one from
Fayetteville to Columbia, and one
from Asheville to Knoxville as
well as one from Asheville to
Wilmington.
Seaboard would provide "great
er integration of service than
State with greater economy of
route mileage,’’ the brief says.
Seaboard’s east-west route would
also afford trunk-line connections
with National Airlines at Wilming
tor with Eastern Airlines at
Charlotte, and with Pennsylvania
Central Airlines at Asheville and
Knoxville, while its north-south
route would integrate with Na
tional and PCA at Norfolk and
with Delta Airlines at Columbia.
Routes Coincide
The routes which Southeast
Airlines seeks, coincide in many
places with these proposed routes
of State and Seaboard.
MORE ABOUT
MIAMI
FROM PAGE ONE
as $1,500 to $2,000 a game, he
said.
Another big businessman
“victim” being fattened for the
kill had the unusual fortune to
come out on top with the rack
eteer’s money. The “kill” never
materialized after the hotel de
tective staff visited the crooks.
The card sharks left that night
and left a sizable portion of their
operating cash with the would-be
victim.
MORE ABOET
GHOST
FROM PAGE ONE
The board took Bellamy’s ad
vice under consideration pending
further investigation.
Withholds Decision
The board yesterday also took
under consideration a request for
$500 for support of the fishing
rodeo proposed by the Southeastern
North 'Carolina Beach association
for August 30 to September 30.
WILSON GETS SINGERS
WILSON. Aug. 12. —(JP)— The
Eastern Carolina annual singing
convention, formerly held each
year since 1940 at Middlesex on
the fourth Sunday in May, will be
held at Wilson beginning next year,
the convention’s executive commit
tee announced Monday.
Dial 2-3311 For Newspaper Service
y Kr'yyMg fjri
)?cn 10 SIgFH'
/DELICIOUS
/ VRINKS
9 _0f millions for high quality. AJ- ■
9 ways demand St. Joseph Aspirin, H
9 world’s largest seller at 10c. gave I
9 more on 100 tablet size 36c- Get I
WILMINGTON
ONE DAY ONLY
BELLAMY PARK
Afternoon Might
3 o'clock 8 o'clock
DOORS OPEN 2 and 7 P. M.
fahi&vonuini in (
f Ctaan CbnuAsmsmi
GIGANTIC WILD-ANIMAL ACTS
including DAMOO DHOTRE of India and
a great group ol the jungle's fiercest beasts.
The LONDON MUSIC HALL CHIMPS
In antics as amazing as they are amusing.
^20 TONS of PERFORMING ELEPHANTS
* Acrobatic ad Aortal Aces * leper* HORSES
* BAUET la the CLOWS * Caperuf CLOURS
* OwRMa laaoprai SPECTACLE * MEMACERK
In view of the unprecedented
seat demand, patrons are urged
to secure tickets early—on sale
Show Day, 10 A. M. to 5 P. M.,
at Saunders Drug Store
MORE ABOUT
FARMERS
FROM PAGE ONE
The citizens’ group-described
as “mature, independent men,
including some veterans’—seiz
ed the machinery Saturday and
took it to the Sand Mountain
area, where the complaining
citizens lived.
Smith said they expected to
finish the work "in about two
weeks,” and promised the board
the machinery would be returned
in good condition.
Smith said the group came here
and took the equipment from the;
yards of County Commissioners
John Wallace and Dewey Bryant
He said both told him to "go ahead
and take it.”
The veteran-farmer group served
notice, however, that unless Wal
lace and Bryant showed "immedi
ate cooperation” in getting the road
work underway, they would ask the
commissioners to resign by insti
tuting “the proper legal proceed
ings.”
There was no display of violence
Monday, although the State patrol
men under direction of State Pa
trol Chief Clyde Sellers, remained
here as a precaution against dis
order.
MORE ABOUT
CAPE FEAR
FROM PAGE ONE
which we can repay him for com
ing forward in the friendly, enthu
siastic way he did. His action gives
the whole affair a human touch
which changes the old picture from
just an old picture to a living me
mento of the days that are no more.
Thanks a lot, Mr. Quinlivan.
Meanwhile, now that Mr. Quinliv
an has identified two of the faces
in the picture, we excitedly await
for more identifications to roll in.
We are still mighty anxious to dis
cover the name of the little girl or
boy sitting in the wash-pan.
MORE ABOUT
HOUSECLEANINGS
FROM PAGE ONE
vide for human needs during re
conversion, its shameful subser
vience to lobbyists for special in
terests, its legislative assaults
against the masses of American
workers, sound a warning how our
democratic system can be stifled
when a Congress is unresponsive
to the will of the people.”
The statement further called
for ‘‘a sweeping Congressional
housecleaning” and said “to this
end the executive council directs
that the political activities of the
AFL, both on local and national
bases, be explained and intensi
fied.”
The council also called for state
federations and city central
AFL bodies to appoint special
committees “to see that qualified
voters, among the 7,000,000 AFL
members and their friends, regis
ter and vote in Congressional
elections this year.”
MORE ABOUT
ARGUMENTS
FROM PAGE ONE
when the action on general debates
was taken, and agreed promptly
that the secretariat had erred in
its preparation of the agenda. He
scheduled further debate on the
Italian declaration for Tuesday and
shortly before the long session was
recessed, promised that the name
of Soviet Foreign Minister Molotov
would be placed on the agenda for
an address in reply to the tlalian
case.
“I hold that the agenda prepared
FOR
BODY ft
FLAVOR
Tar Heel Tobacco Box Score
Market Lbs. Sold Av. Price Top Price
Chadbourn . 325,000 57.00 66.00
Clarkton . • • • • • • • •
Fairmont . 400,000 59.00 86.00
Fair Bluff .. 322,644 58.70 ....
Fayetteville .. ,x,.. 89,112 54.00 68.00
Lumberton . 1,112,512 59.51 ....
Tabor City . 371,114 56.77 75.00
White ville . 1,105,386 57.00 66.00
Official figures were not available late last night
from the Clarkton markets. Unofficial sources report
sales ‘about as usual’.
the secretariat was not in ac
d with the official stenographic
.Dort,’’ Byrnes said. “Therefore
will not be necessary for a vote
■on the conference to continue the
debate.’’
The Yugoslav delegate, Vice Pre
mier Edward Kardelj, mads a long
and impassioned appeal to the con
ference to hold the Italian state as
such, and not Fascism alone, res
ponsible for Italy’s part in the war.
Many Arguments
The day’s proceedings were
marked by protracted arguments,
but some rapid strides were made.
The conference voted unanimously
to invite Albania, Cuba, Mexico
and Egypt to give their views cn
the Italian treaty, although they :
spent hours debating the rules
which should govern these appear
ances.
MORE ABOUT
TOBACCO
FROM PAGE ONE
tags were reported turned during
Monday sales.
Tabor City
The Tabor City market set a
new season record Monday when 1
they handled a total of 371,114
pounds with the growers receiving i
$210,671.87. Willard G. Cole report
ed the average price was $56.771
with several piles of wrappers
bringing up to $75.00 per hundred.
Fairmont
Charles B. Stafford, sales super
visor of the Fairmont market re
ported that for the season 4.979,
743 pounds have been sold with a
price of $2,858,374.87 being paid,
for an average of $86.00 per hun
dred. He said much of Monday’s ■
sales were from Eastern North
Carolina farms and that farmers
were highly pleased with the prices
their crops brought.
Fair Bluff
From the Fair Bluff market, C. ;
B. Townsend reported that 322.644
pounds of the weed was sold bring
ing a price of $189,392*02 for an j
average of $58.70 per hundred. He 1
said sales continued high.
Whiteville
Walter Paramore, sales super
visor of the Whiteville marts, re
ported that Whiteville sold 1,105,386
pounds for $625,350.01 at an aver
age of 57 cents per pound. The of
ferings included sand lugs, cut
ters and primings. A larger amount
of leaf than usual appeared on the
floors Monday, he said. One row of
about 80 baskets sold for $66.00 per
hundred. The averages continue to
rise at Whiteville, he reported.
Chadbourn
very Tew tags were turned on
the Chadbourn market and the
farmers continued pleased with the
prices, according to Hugh Nance,
sales supervisor. Full sales on all
floors Monday with the prices re
maining about the same. Good leaf
and cutter sold for as high as $66.00
per hundred pounds. The estimat
ed sales for Monday was reported
to be 325,000 pounds for an average
of $57.00 per hundred.
Fayetteville
The Cumberland county markets
reported a total sales Monday of
89,112 pounds with an average of
$54.00 per hundred and some bas
kets bringing as high as $68.00.
Luinberton
Reporting the highest averages
this season, Bob Rankin, of the
Lumberton mart said last night
that 1,112,512 pounds of tobacco
had been sold there Monday bring
ing a total of $662,089.40 for an
average of $59.51. Rankin report
ed the quality was ‘only fair’ and
predicted the sales would soar
higher Tuesday,
Clarkton
Figures were not available from
the Clarkton market late last night,
but unofficial sources reported the
prices were ‘about as usual’ and
, sales continuing high.
MORE ABOUT
FAMILY
FROM PAGE ONE
of the family. He said a confes
sion had been obtained from one
member of the family and that
“stacks of letters had been con
fiscated as evidence of their opera
tions”.
(At his home in New York, the
59-year-old father identified him.
self to reporters as a rug impor
ter. He said he had known nothing
about the charges until reporters
informed him.
Declines Talk
(The elder Warner said the re
port was “ludicrous”, and later
retired within his two-room apart
ment, declining to talk with any
one. A woman who identified her
self as a relative said he was in a
near state of collapse.
(Warner told reporters he had
sent his sons overseas cigarettes
and money and had received small
sums of money from them. He said
“it’s possible they may have had
deals but I know only about the
rug business I run with Charles
Ladewig of Brussels”. He said his
son, Alfred, 27, was a jewelry
buyer for a firm and travelled a
sales territory from New York to
Paris.)
MORE ABOUT
VOTING
FROM PAGE ONE
emphasized its determination to
place its responsibilities above “any
group interest.” It announced plans
for active participation in the af
fairs of government “from the pre
cinct level to the highest office.” j
Tom Watkins of Charlotte, or
ganization spokesman and 10th dis- ■
trict chairman, said the new group
would not be an independent party
but would work through the present
Democratic setup to nominate what
they believed to be the best can-i
didates.
To Take Time
“In time we will offer our own
candidates,” he added.
An organization statement said:
“We favor a personnel analysis
of all state departments to promote i
and improve economical utiliza-1;
tion of personnel.”
There was no immediate com
ment from State Democratic party
leaders regarding the new organiz
ation.
Temporary district chairmen
were named to organize perman
ent groups in the state’s 100 coun
ties from the estimated 300,000 eli
gible for membership, A state con
vention will be held when the
groups have been formed.
District Chairmen
The temporary chairmen are;
L. H. Fountain, Tarboro, second
district; Walter Britt, Clinton,
third; Mayne Albright, fourth;
Winfield Blackwell, Winston-Salem,
fifth; Norman Block, Greensboro,
sixth; Rudolph Ments, Southport,
seventh; John Lang, Carthage,
eighth; Thomas Broughton, Lenoir,
ninth; Tom Watkins, 10th; and
Frank Parker, 12th. First and 11th
district chairmen will be named
soon.
The veterans’ platform said; "As
citizens we recognize our duty and
responsibility to participate in the
orderly achievement of progressive
: aims through our Democratic gov
| ernment. As members of tire arm
ed services we resolved to dis
charge our duty and responsibility
and now as veterans we place those
; above any other group interest.’’
MORE ABOUT
REHDERS
FROM PAGE ONE
"Mrs. Rehder” since she is as
pleasant and informal as the rol
licking little aircraft she flies—
Laverne has the honor of being the
first woman in Southeastern North
Carolina who learned to take a
plane up in the air and bring it
back down to earth again witho us
tmouch as fudging a wingtip or
smudging her lipstick. She started
her flying lessons on July 21, 1936,
and just a few weeks later, on Au
gust 10, 1936, she was soloing up
stairs without even one backseat
driver to tell her which clouds to
dodge.
At the same time, her future hus
band, Mr. Burk Rehder, was learn
ing the same stuff. Two years later
they decided to consolidate their
aerial talents, and they became,
through a mutual love of airplanes
and each other and the blessings
of a minister, the Two Flying
' Rehders.
Third Flyer
For years ago the third member
of the flying combine Johnny,
zoomed into the flight formation.
The doctor predicted that Johnny
would be born on July 21, the same
day his mother started her flying
lessons. Johnny, however, flying
by the seat of his pants like every
good pilot, didn’t land until August
10, the same day his mother made
her first solo.
The Rehders look upon this
coincidence as a sort of an omen,
and the omen proved correct.
Youngest Airman
Exactly 29 days after he was
born, at a time when most babies
are getting broken to their car
riages, Johnny was up there in
the clouds with his mama and
FALSE TEETH
That Loosen
Need Not Embarrass
Many wearers of false teeth have suf
fered real embarrassment because their
plate dropped, slipped or wabbled at
just the wrong time. Do not live in
fear of this happening to you. Just
sprinkle a little FASTEETH, the alka
line (non-acid) powder, on your plates.
Holds false teeth more firmly, so they
feel more comfortable. Does not sour.
Checks “plate odor” (denture breath)
Get FASTEETH at any drug store.
I —- I
daddy, and he has been flying on
and off every since. What’s more,
he can actually fly a plane by
himself now. He sits in the lap
of his mama or daddy and handles
the stick and the throttle with a
master’s touch.
Although he isn’t entrusted yet
with the tricky business of taking
off and landing, he makes “won
derful banks and turns,” according
to his parents, who are expert
judges on such things.
10,000 R. P. M.
When we asked Laverne how she
manages to be a pilot, a wife, a
mother, and a housekeeper all at
the same time, she shrugged her
shoulders like a plane dipping its
wing and laughed: “The pilot part
is what does it. I just fly through
all my work and get it done in
no time at all at about 10,000
RPM.”
While Laverne is doing her share
of the trio’s business up in the air
and down on the ground, Burk is
as busy as a B--29 with the air
field — Carolina Skyways, on the
Wrightsville Beach highway —
which he and brother John have
leased. Burk, with a tour of duty
with the war-time Civil Air Patrol
and a hitch as an instructor of
Army aviation cadets behind him,
handles most of the teaching and
sight-seeing end of the business.
John, an A (for aircraft) and E
(for engine) mechanic, holds up
the maintenance end, although he
also has a private license of his
own.
Sticks To Ground
John and Burk are the sons of
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Rehder, of
Woodlawn. Mrs. Rehder has been
up with her soaring sons, but Mr.
Rehder still sticks close to the
ground. "I love airplanes,” says
Mr. Rehder, "but I’m satisfied
just to have that airplane propel
lor handing in my living room.”
Laverne, however, has other
ideas on the matter. "We’ll get
him up one of these days,” she
told us, "and I’ll bet that once
we do he’ll act just like his grand
son Johnny — he won’t want to
come back down to earth."
Age Of Flight
That, we’ll wager, coming from i
the first woman in Southeastern
North Carolina to earn her wings,
is probably just exactly what will
happen. After all, this is the Age
of Flight, and if half of the family
has decided to live in the clouds
the other half mightjust as well
start packing its belongings fori
the journey aloft.
MORE ABOUT
CIVIL STRIFE
FROM PAGE ONE
As the British decision was made
known, rigid military restrictions
were clamped on Palestine. Tank
led Tommies streamed into key
ports of disembarkation. Barbed
wire ringed streets and govern
ment buildings.
Cruisers On Guard
Off heavily guarded Haifa har
bor lay the British Cruiser Ajax
and British destroyers. Two empty
troopships were anchored in the
harbor—possibly for use in deport
ing thousand! of uncertified refu
gees who ha! e arrived in the past
two weeks.
RAF patrols droned over the
Eastern Mediterranean in search
of new refugee ships reported en
route, and in Cyprus, the island
crown colony, work was rushed
on the completion of a huge deten
tion camp.
Situation Unfair
The government announcement,
foreshadowed by weeks of diplo
matic and military preparations,
said Britain could not tolerate “the
attempt by a minority of Zionist
extremists to exploit the sufferings
of unfortunate people in order to
create a situation prejudicial to
a just settlement.” This situation
was unfair, the statement said, to
the regular Jewish immigrants
certified under the legal 1,500
monthly quota.
The steady stream of immigrants
in recent months is not, the gov
ernment said, a spontaneous move,
ment by European Jews who see
their only hope in Palestine.
In Paris, where the Jewish
agency executive is conferring.
Agency Chairman David Ben Gur
ion commeted that ‘‘it is not yet
sure that Mr. Bevin British For
eign secretary) should have the
I
LEMIM
FRIDAY
AUGUST 16
PRE-SALE I AT DOOR
1.80 Plus Tax | 2.25 Plus Tax
iLONG
&
HIS
ORCHESTRA
Tickets On Sale At
McGrath Music Co.
Young Mon's Shop
Lumina Pavilion
last word in history,” and Berl
Locker, British member of the
executive, predicted the decision
would result in “much more suf
fering.” Mrs. Goldie Meyerson,
leader of the Jewish in Palestine,
exclaimed, “it is almost beyond
'belief.”
TRUMAN MAY HAVE
COMPROMISE PLANS
WASHINGTON. Aug. 12.— (A3) —
An American compromise plan to
end Arab-Jewish strife in Palestine
was reported unofficially to have
reached President Truman’s desk
Monday only a few hours before
Britain served notice she will crack
down on future illegal entries to
the Holy Land.
Acting Secretary of State Dean
Acheson hurried to the White
House as anxiety mounted here
over the necessity of easing the
potentially explosive mid-Eastern
situation.
Acheson Silent
Acheson himself remained silent
on the new developments—develop
ments made even more poignant
by the arrival off the barricaded
port of Haifa of two more battered
ships crowded by more than 1200
Jewish refugees.
Sources in close touch with the
State department expressed little
surprise at the British announce
ment that “uncertifcated” refugees
to Palestine would be taken to “cy
press or elsewhere” and housed in.
camps until their future has been
decided.
Position Difficult
There was no tendency on the
part of diplomatic offic;als to
minimize the difficult position in
which Britain now finds herself—
regardless of the controversy over
why and what and who created it.
Nor was there unqualified hope
I in official quarters that the Amer
jican compromise plan — if and
j when it receives President Tru
FAIIIITE
LAXATIVE
MILLIOIS
rti ii ran
• LAST TIMES TODAY •
First Local Showings!
* 2nd 1st Run Color Hit *
"ROMANCE OF THE WEST"
Starring EDDIE DEAN
Plus: Donald Duck Cartoon!
★ STARTS TOMORROW ★
“THE FLEET’S IN”
Dorothy Lamour—Eddie Bracken
“EXPERIMENT PERILOUS"
Hedy Lamarr—George Brent
She Was Ready
For Love!
Why Was He
Afraid!
Meet A New Star!
That Guild Gal!
She Rhymes With
Wild!
2a '
«NTURY-FCX
LLOYD NOLAN - RICHARD CONTE
COLOR CARTOON COMEDY RIOT!
“JOHNNY SMITH & POKER HUNTAS”
” STARTS TODAY!
man s okay—will produce c -v,
able solution.
Based upon the pr:-.c;.-0
partition of the Hoiv La
as now dafted was ’report :-P'^
for: ’ Co*
Three Plan Pact
1. Creation of a je ,r. MPe ..
approximately 1800 so.:-- e r 4
approximately 300 Ut;i"
proposed in the plan o- ' - - ■!?*}
fered in London and sub^ "L?"
disapproved by Preside..- r '■!
2. A United States cc trihntf3,
of $300,000,000 to raise - - e i •
mic social education s-d -;-i "'
the Arabs states. Of this sj- L:1
000.000 would bbe ear-ms-'-17'.
the Arabs in Palestine.' """ ‘o:
parttomimiwhjer.pcmf-Avn
3. Wide latitude for'-he je--" '
control immigration v*.-•
own zone. .
British Object
It was learned from
sources that this plan ha's b«e
shown to the Briiish gove--e^
on a tentative basis, ar,d "i
did not find unqualified approval *
So Neal!
So Sweet!
So
Indiscreet!
ROefltT 4 RAYMOND KAX5M
p/timi
CINGER ROGERS
m SAM WOOO’S
JEAN PIERRE AUMONT
ADOLPHE MENJOU
M«W£W Ctofi ■ MAHoii >«*w |
M«m Mwt: ■ Ed v or do C«.iEi ?
| | lt*«rY Wpoowtow *
j BA5ILRATHBONE
V »,
Donald Duck Cartoon
Latest News

Shows 1:05 — S:54
4:56 — 6:58 — 9:00
II * -..
IMABGARET LOCKWOOD PHTILIS CALVtST
JAMES MASON STEWART GRAS®
Extra
| Sport Novelty — Cartoon
I—TODAY ONLY-"]
UNHOLY TERROR! |
I
j
—Added—
Color Cartoon — Novelty |
—Tomorrow—
j "MOONLIGHT ON THE RANGE

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