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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, August 29, 1946, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1946-08-29/ed-1/seq-2/

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BUDGET-DRAFTING
GROUP ENDS WORK
Community Chest Commit
tee To Submit Proposals
To Directors Soon
Tentative 1947 budgets for the 12
Red Feather services of the Wil
mington Community Chest were
completed yesterday for submis
sion to Chest directors late next
week by a special committee head
ed by E. L. White.
The budget-drafting group wound
up expense estimates for seven
agencies at a two-hour afternoon
meeting in the director’s room of
the Wilmington Savings and Trust
company.
Tentative budgets were approved
by the 12-member committee at
yesterday’s session for the Brigade
Boys club, the Cameron Memorial
camp, the Girl Scouts, the Young
Women's Christian association, the
Travelers Aid society, the Family
Service society, and the Salvation
\rmy.
Group Personnel
The committee approving the
tentative allotments consisted of
J. Holmes Davis, Sr., W. Elliott
O’Neal, Howard Penton, Warren
Johnson, J. Goodlet Thornton, the
Rev. Walter B. Freed, Mrs. Her
bert Bluethenthal, Pomeroy
Nichols, Rabbi Samuel A. Fried
man, Harmon C. Rorison, John H.
Hardin, vice chairman, and White.
Tentative budget decisions were
rendered from studies of the in
come and expenditures of individ
ual agencies for 1944 and 1945, with
their budgets for 1946 and esti
mates by their directors for 1947.
Individual Study
Each member of the budget com
mittee was assigned an individual
service to study in detail.
In announcing approval of tenta
tive schedules, White praised the I
committee as “one of the hardest
working in my experience.”
For Newspaper Service Dial 2-3311
t

DOG RACES
TONIGHT!
Post Time 8:15 P. M.
CAROLINA REACH
DOG RACE TRACK
ONE MILE NORTH INLAND
WATERWAY BRIDGE
Carolina Beach Highway
ADMISSION 50c
MORE ABOUT
CAPE FEAR
FROM PAGE ONE
of the Mr. Evans’ rebus printed
on the piece of paper along with
the above rules and prize list, we
wonder whether anybody won'.those
Kid Button Shoes and the other
awards.
If anybody did, we sure wish he
or she would come forward and
identify himself or herself. Such
genius should not go unacclaimed,
even though it solved the super
puzzle some 57 years ago.
* * *
PRNCESS EMPORIUM—Mr. H.
C. Evans, by the way, had his shoe
emporium at 117 Princess street.
According to the advertising on
the rebus paper, he sold “Ladies’,
Gents’, and Children’s Fine Shoes.”
Mr Evans also announced “My
Stock of FALL AND WINTER
GOODS is being daily received, and
I invite all to become customers,
and contest for the prizes. All kinds:
of men's working shoes constantly
on hand. A full line of school shoes
at very low prices. Health and
Comfort. Neatness and Durability.’’
Well, we repeat that we contend
that we believe Mr. Evans’ rebus
contest to be the first commercial
prize contest ever undertaken in
these parts. Meanwhile, until some
codv comes along with an older
5ne" we’ll crack our brains on iti
md see whether we can’t solve the;
hing ourself.
MORE ABOUT
TASK
FROM PAGE ONE
His chore perhaps is the more
difficult of the two. House leaders
sometimes have a reasonably clear
dea of what the morrow will bring, j
out in the Senate they just takej
pot luck.
it matters not
Senators called it a day on Tuesday
they were just getting into the
swing of debate on a hill to abolish
dandruff. Wednesday morning the,
pro-dandruff bloc may decide to
open up n few' days discussion of
Brazil nuts.
To a lesser degree Trimble faces
a similar problem. The opening of
each House session furnishes op
portunity for a series of one-minute
speeches.
Rolls Under Fire
On one morning in the recent ses
sion those addresses included a
discussion of the size of the rolls
in the House restaurant, a declara
tion that UNRRA delegates could
be fed for $13.50 a head cheaper
in Nebraska than at Atlantic City,
and a speech entitled "What Is
Driving the American People
Crazy?’’ (The OPA, Rep. Jessie
Sumner (R-I1D Declared).
Anyway, Biffle and Trimble are
in the market for a crystal ball—
something to replace the eight-ball
they’re behind.
For Newspaper Service Dial 2-3311
| To* Never Clean**/ row |
- IMPUTES I
So Easily J
Kleenite end* mossy, harm
ful brushing. J»t put your
piste or bridge in a glass
•f water. Add a little Klee*
nite. Presto! Stains, dts
joIorations, denture Oder disappear. Your
:eetti sparkle like new. Ask ymtr drmggmi
today for Kleenite.
Jet KLEENITE today at Futrelle’s
Pharmacy, Brooklyn Pharmacvj
md all good druggists.
FaLa Oof; Fda In
ALBANY, N. Y., Aug. 28—UP)—
Fala got the bum’s rush from a
Maine hotel the other day, but
they’re rolling out the red rug
for the Scottie and his mistress,
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, at an
Albany hotel.
You will recall that the widow
of FDR refused to stay at a
Maine inn because it barred Fala.
But the former First Lady has
the assurance of John J. Hyland,
manager of the DeWitt Clintoi
hotel here, that both she and her
dog will be welcome when they
check in Tuesday for the Demo
cratic state convention. Mrs. Roo
sevelt is the convetion keynoter.
MORE ABOUT
RESERVE
FROM PAGE ONE
will do part of its training is now
docked in Charleston waiting for
transfer here, Commander Daniel
said as he urged the oficers at
the meeting to fill out applications
for service with the unit. Many of
:he 30 officers filled out the blanks,
which will be forwarded to Charles
:on immediately.
When the unit gets activated and
starts its one-night-per-week train.
ng and two-week-cruise-per-year
irogram, its total yearly payroll
should run around $30,000, the com
pander estimated.
Lieutenant Bost, who will assist
he commanding officer in recruit
ng the “paper work”, will con
sinue to serve the local unit until
July 1, 1947, unless his duties are
:ompleted here before then.
Wilmington’s unit will be one of
18 units in the district. Thirty,
seven of them will be surface units,
and one a submarine unit. The
atter is slated for Savannah, Ga.,
Commander Daniel said.
MORE ABOUT
POUCE
FROM PAGE ONE
office Sept. 2 without the league
‘‘our position will harden.” The
league has threatened to make it
impossible for the interim govern
ment to function but has declined
to say when “direction action”
may start.
M A. Jinnah, Moslem league
president, Wednesday asked league
members to boycott any govern
ment sponsored meetings or con
ferences, in the first step of non
cooperation with the interim gov
ernment.
Jinnah urged the boycott to pro
test “the objectionable composi
tion” of the executive council
named by the Viceroy, Lord
Wavell.
Mohandas K. Gandhi took notice
of the situation Wednesday night
at a prayer meeting, saying “the
atmosphere of India is charged
with tension.”
“You will probably expect me
to say something about that,” he
idded. “But there are some situa
tions in which silence is golden.
This is one of them.”
MORE ABOUT
DEMURE
FROM PAGE ONE
hold down the automobile, a favor,
ite dining table belonging to Mrs.
sackritter bounced out of the box'
tar.
But outside of that mishap it has
ieen a pleasant trip.
“We’d do it again, if we had to,”
hey said.
too PROOP
LIQUEUR
•t
r
-
TOBACCO MARKETS
DECLARE HOLIDAY
Prices Continue Irregular
As Marts Close Down
For Seven Days
Prices continued to be irregular
-in the flue-cured markets of the
Border Belt and Eastern North
-arolina belt as the warehouses
prepared to close down for a week’s
sales holiday.
Several of the markets reported
the farmers were taking their to
bacco home rather than have it
remain on the warehouse floors
until the markets re-open Thurs
day. September 5.
The warehouses closed their
doors last night under an agree
ment reached several days ago.
The agreement was promp+ed by
the congested conditions at most
redrying plants.
On the Border Belts yesterday
the increases and decreases were
about evenly divided. Sales were
reported to be heavy at all markets
and several reported their floors
had been cleared by the time they
closed down for the holiday.
Average Prices
Average prices, per hundred
| pounds, on a limited number of rep
resentative grades on the Border
! Belt:
Leaf — good lemon $63. unchang
ed; low lemon $51. up $1; fair
lemon (greenish) $56, up $7: fine
orange $64, up $6; low green
(lemonside) $35, down $3.
Smoking leaf — good orange $64.
up $1: fair orange $57, down $1.
Cutters — fair lemon $55, up $1;
good orange $63, down $1; low
orange $57. down $4.
Lugs — good lemon $59, down $2:
fair lemon $48. down $3: fine
orange $62, up $1; low orange $31,
down $4.
Nondescript — best thin $16, up
50 cents.
Average prices, per hundred
pounds, on a limited number of
representath e grades on the East
ern North Carolina markets:
Leaf — good lemon $46. unchang
ed; fair lemon $62. up $2: fair
orange $56. up $1; low orange $43.
down $1; common orange $32, down
$2.
Cutters — fair lemon $66. un
changed: low’ lemon $65. unchang
ed: low’ orange $62. unchanged.
Lugs — fine lemon $64. down $1:
good lemon $63. up $1; fair lemon
S51, unchanged; good orange $58.
down $2; fair orange $47, down $4;
low orange $29. down $5.
Primings — good lemon $59. up
$1; fair lemon $43, unchanged:
low lemon $25. up $1.50; fair
orange $33, down $1.
Nondescript — best thin $16,
down $1.50.
lU. S. STANDS FIRM
AGAINST ALBANIA
Johnson Refuses To Bow
To Russian Wishes For
Seat For Nation
LAKE SUCCESS, N. Y., Aug. 28.
—(JP)—The United States stood firm
Wednesday night in the United
Nations Security council against
admitting Russian-sponsored Al
bania and outer Mongolia to the
U. N. and the council adjourned
until Thursday without reaching
a decision on any of the eight ap
plications before it.
Dr. Oscar Lange. Polish delegate
and council president, warned the
delegates to be prepared for three
sessions Thursday, for the council
must conclude its consideration of
the applications by that night in
order to submit them to all the
United Nations before the General
Assembly meets next month. The
first session will begin at 10:30
a. m. EDT.
Virtual Veto
The United States virtually veto
ed the admission of Albania and
outer Mongolia after strong Rus
sian opposition forced withdrawal
of a U. S. plan proposing accept
ance of all eight applications.
Vassili Dendramis, speaking for
Greece, delivered a long and detail
ed indictment of Albania to the
council, asking it to postpone a
decision on that application.
MORE ABOUT
BOYD
FROM PAGE ONE
increased and direct air passenger
service” to interest "many more
northern and middle western
manufacturers to establish branch
plants here and for the Wilmington
area to develop favorable economic
balance,” the brief says.
STATE AIRLINES
ASKS APPROVAL
WASHINGTON, Aug. 28—<£>)—
Nineteen cities urged the Civil
Aeronautics board Wednesday to
add many new stops and miles
to the tremendously expanded air
line network recommended by its
examiners for southeastern states.
State Airlines, Inc., of Charlotte,
N. C. pleaded for approval of six
routes proposed for it in the Pied
mont region, plus lines to Cincin
nati and Norfolk, while Key Air
Lines, of Meridan, Miss., asked
the board to hold its recommended
awards to Southern Airways, Inc.,
west of Dothan, Montgomery, Bir
mingham and Huntsville, Ala.
The board, while it expects to
complete hearing final oral argu
ments in the Southeastern case
Thursday, gave no indication when
a decision might be expected, but
attaches predicted ‘‘it will be
months.”
In Lead Role
JOHN BEAL
Well known stage and screen star
will portray the lead role “The Big
ger Fight”, another of the radio
series of plays covering “Adven
tures of the Red Feather Man,”
and which will be heard over
WMFD at 10:46 o’clock this morn
|ng
BLAST AT BAKERY
CAUSED BY LEAKS
Investigators Fix Cause Oi
Explosion At Pastry
Plant On Sunday
A leaking valve that filled the
interior of the Tasty Bakery with
natural gas Sunday morning wa:
blamed yesterday for the $3,000 ex
plosion that wrecked the bakery’:
interior by Fire Chief Luddie
Croom yesterday.
Croom's report, compiled by i
special committee of investigator:
said that a small fire of unknowr
origin in one of the bakery’s cabi
nets had ignited the free gas tc
produce the explosion.
The report was filed with Citj
Building Inspector Gilbert F. Mor
ton yesterday.
The blast-producing fire, the in
vestigators asserted, might have
been produced by spontaneous
ignition or by sparks of a cigarette.
There was no electric wiring in the
vicinity of the cabinet in which
it centered.
“It is very unusual for fires oi
this kind to happen, though it is
possible but not probable,’’ the
! chiefs board said.
_
KIWANIANS HEAR
COAST LINE MAN
Roland Jobb, Development
Manager, Speaks At
Luncheon Meeting
Efforts of the Atlantic Coast
Line to foster the development oi
the agricultural and industrial re
cources of the territory served by
the company was rather fully de
scribed for the benefit of Kiwanis
club members at their regular
luncheon meeting yesterday' by
Roland Jobb, manager of the de
velopment service department oi
the local carrier.
Introduced by Kiwanian George
Mitchell who had charge of the
program for the day, Jobb pointed
out at the outset of his interesting
talk, that the Coast Line for years
had realized a large part of its
revenues from haulage of fruit
and vegetables from Florida. Then
in 1937, he said, the management
authorized the fostering of new
industrial enterprises, forest con
servation and agricultural develop
ment and considerably headway
was made up until World War II
began.
To Explore Minerals
Continuing, Mr. Jobb explained
that now his department consists
of two industrial agents, two geolo
gists and an experienced forestry
man and that every effort will be
made to explore the mineral re
sources of all the territory served
by ACL. Deposits will be mapped
and recorded and every effort
made to instill sound forestry
practices among farmers of the
territory.
Regarding industrial progress,
the speaker said that Wilmington
has made excellent progress, de
spite the keen competition from
neighboring cities. All in all, he
said, the South seems now to be
fully awake to its possibilities.
Jack LeGrand, Harry Solomon
and Dr. Hoggard were named al
ternate delegates to the district
Kiwanis convention to be held at
Greensboro. Regular club delegates
will be President Laney, Secretary
Walter Freed and Rex Willis.
Announcement was made by the
president that the annual election
of officers would be held on October
9.
Guests of the club were Ray Tru
Iuck, American Sales Book com
pany, Dr. Houston Moore and Ki
wanian Fletcher Rourk of Walker
ville, Ont.
MORE ABOUT
TENANTS
FROM PAGE ONE
The local Veterans of Foreign
Wars post, which has initiated a
co-operative to obtain the Lake
Forest units for veterans, is
awaiting advices from Washington
headquarters of the FPHA as to
the legality of the co-operative,
local VFW official* said last ai*ht..
Five Mile Roadway
Project Ready For
Work, Betts States
The State Highway commission
will begin work immediately on
constructing the five mile road that
will link Market Street and Castle
Hayne roads, according to an an
nouncement yesterday by T. T.
Betts, district highway engineer.
The roadway, which will extend
from Prince George drive to the
Market Street road, will connect
State Highways 17 and 117. « i
the largest project in the nine-mi e
improvement program the com
mission will undertake in New
Hanover county.
Engineer Betts said that the
present program does not include
the paving of the River road to
the point where it joins the Caro
lina Beach highway, just this side
of Snow’s cut, or the inland water
way bridge, nor will the old Tide
Water Power company right of
way be paved from Bradleys Creek
to Wrightsville Sound.
He said that the three bridge*
authorized for Brunswick river,
Alligator and Jackies creeks, could
not be constructed at this time,
because of the acute steel shortage.
He added that he would like to see
these traffic hazards eliminated as
soon as possible as many highway
deaths and injuries have been
scored against these narrow spans.
WINTER PARK MAY
RECEIVE RELIEF
Highway Commission
Chairman, Engineer To
Confer Today
A. H. Graham, State Highway
rommission chairman, and T. T.
Betts, of Fayetteville, the commis
sion’s district engineer, ■wall meet
in Raleigh tonight to discuss
plans to alleviate the drainage situ
ation in Winter Park, Graham told
the Star last night.
Graham said in a telephone con
versation from Raleigh that he has
received no word from Gov. R.
Gregg Cherry with reference to a
! telegraphic complaint over Sun
, day’s Winter Park floods which
was dispatched to the Governor by
17 residents of the district late
Tuesday night.
The highway commission chair
man reported that his work gangs
had been “very much put to it to
provide relief all over Eastern
North Carolina in view of the al
most unprecedented rains of the
last SO days.”
Many Problems
New Hanover, Bladen and Bruns
wick counties had all reported seri
ous drainage problems in the wake
of the week-end storms, he assert
ed.
“We are trying to give Winter
Park as much road improvement
as possible,” Graham said.
Earlier, Betts had promised that
commission laborers "would begin
work on the Winter Park drainage
project as soon as the heavy rains
have abated.
The highway commission engi
neer explained that the commission
takes responsibility only for keep
ing highway ditches open and pre
venting state road floods in Winter
Park.
mUJREi ADUl 1.
OIL MEN
FROM PAGE ONE
of different products funneled by
the oil companies already located
here. These pipes, the oil man said,
would constitute a menace in them
selves.
(2) The entire project would cost
close to a million dollars, he esti
mated, because of the complexity
of the pipe system, and a new cen
tral terminal would need to be set
up across the river at considerable
operating expense either to the city
or the companies involved.
Too Swampy
(3) Eagle Island, the suggested
site for the cross-river terminal, is
too swampy for such use. It might
be necessary to set up tanks across
the Brunswick river, nearly two
miles from Wilmington.
(4) The single conduit which
carry the pipe lines under the river
would be a constant fire hazard
because of leaking oil rising to
the surface. Ship anchors weighing
close to 30 tons, could crack the sur
face of the conduit and set up leaks
at any time, he pointed out.
★ LAST TIMES TODAY ★
ON OUR STAGE
HOLLYWOOD HILLBILLY
i , JAMBOREE
7-V0DVIL ACTS-7
MUSIC—SINGING—DANCING
★ AND ON THE SCREEN *
"BIRTH OF THE BLUES"
Bing Crosby—Mary Martin
★ STARTS TOMORROW *
10—BIG HITS * 3M HR. SHOW
"GUNBOAT RYTHM"
Leon Erroll—Frankie Carle
“YELLOW ROSE OF TEXAS”
ROY ROGERS and TRIGGER
6—CARTOONS—6
COMEDY AND SERIAL
NODOC AT NAVAL
YARD FOR REPAIR
Coast Guard Cutter Expect
ed To Reach Local
Port Monday
The Modoc, the V. S. Coasfe
Guard cutter slated to return to
Wilmington after doing war duty
since 1941, is now docked at the
Portsmouth Naval Base, Norfolk,
Va., undergoing minor repairs, a
spokesman for the Coast Guard in
Washington said yesterday.
The repairs should take about
three days, the spokesman con
tinued, after which the vessel will
journey to Wilmington with arrival
tentatively scheduled for Monday
or Tuesday of next week.
Commander G. W. Playdon is in
charge of the vessel, the spokes
man said.
At New Orleans
The Modoc recently completed
an assignment on the international
ice patrol in the North Atlantic.
During recent months she has
been on duty at New Orleans
where she has been towing fri
gates for decommissioning.
It is presumed she will return
to her former berth at the custom
house wharf on arrival.
The last visit of the Modoc to
Wilmington was in the spring of
1941, when she docked here aft
er a tour of duty at New Orleans.
Before being assigned to war
time duty the Modoc was fitted
with new armament to give her
fire-power superior to that of a
modem destroyer.
Bow Cannon
She was fitted with a five-inch
bow cannon and an identical piece
on the stern. She was also fitted
with a three-inch rapid-fire aft
gun, a “Y” depth-bomb gun and
reinforced mounts for several 50
caliber anti - anticraft machine
guns.
The craft entered the news col
umns periodically during the war
years when she was assigned to
combat duty. Since the entrance
of the United States into World
War II the craft has seen duty
throughout the world.
Admiral Joseph F. Farley, com
mandment of the Coast Guard, in
Washington, served as commander
of the Modoc during one of the
periods she was stationed here.
MORE ABOUT
PORTER
FROM PAGE ONE
OPA has planned to put new'
livestock ceilings into operation
Thursday, w'ith retail ceilings going
into effect Sept. 9. leaving an in
terim period for wholesalers and
distributors to dispose of high-pric
ed stocks bought while controls
W'ere off.
If the same procedure is follow
ed. the new' ceilings imposed by
Anderson w'ould not affect retail
outlets for about three W'eeks. And
OPA officials hinted they might
seek a legal ruling on the secre
tary’s move, which might cause
further delay.
Anderson ordered top ceiling
prices at Chicago of $16.25 per 100
pounds for choice hogs; $20.25 per
100 pounds for choice cattle and
$19 per 100 pounds for lambs, all
live w'eight.
The hog ceilings were $1.40 per
hundredweight higher than those
maintained on June 30, and the
cattle top was $2.25 higher. There
were no lamb ceilings on June 30.
^he new Anderson order came
as a surprise to OPA officials who
admitted they had no advance
word of the secretary’s impending
action.
Porter had insisted that meat
prices should be rolled back to, or
very close to, June 30 figures, and
his agency subordinates had said
publicily that beef ceilings would
be fixed within one to two cents
per pound of the old levels.
Agriculture‘department sources
said the average retail price of
beef at New York city was 56 cents
a pound on July 31, compared with
37.7 cents under the old OPA ceil
ings. The average price of pork
and lard on July 31 was 46 cents,
compared with ' former' OPA top
of 30.2 cents.
Anderson contended that his new
ceilings represented a substantial
roll-back from the current uncon
trolled price levels, even though
they did not meet OPA approval.
More Glorious Adventure
lhan Ever
Before! ...
I^As Red Ryder Bat
ties to Save Thun
der, His Wonder
Horse!
r-irVTi ■ ^ V M
• EXTRA •
ANOTHER THRILLING CHAPTER OP
“THE ROYAL MOUNTED RIDES”
EDGAR KENNEDY COMEDY
—-8 DATS
today
FBI.
_ SAT.
more about ' "
CIVITAHS r
FROM page one
active concurrence withtw“''
Dr. Branham praised
for its cooperation, and h*'* ^
dieted a “bright ar.d pr^JJ
ture” for the Fort City
stem from this cooperation,
Miss Eaton Sing,
Following Dr. Branham-,
dress, the club merrbe- . J? *H"
were treated to a rectv of «,fUeK|
mg voice which hc-iped Mb's ' ?J'
earn her scholarship. “
Accompanied by Miss p.
Jones, a New Hanover His- ,
senior well-known for her ’'°51
technique which ranges f-om
classtes to swing. M:ss Eaton s,^
three songs for the club tn/ !
distinguished guest. ^
More than 1.000 ~^TSors ...
bitten by poisonous snakes'.n,
ally fa the United States. °®*‘
Stirring »
JEANNE CRAIN '
CORNEL WILDE
IP* "ARNElt
hmm, mm
I Shows — — 2:47
4:51—155 -9:00
G. C. F. presents n
VIVIEN CLWK '
LEIGH'* RAINS
m %e***w(&*** i
"CAESAR AND
CLEOPATRA'
It * I '
Temptati#11
ln i
Technic*'0';,
J„ ,5Caf!EIk!
a lot on his nn
> lit ***
thins
added when *
met Cl so!
5 DAYS—STARTIM
TUESDAY—SEPT. 3

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