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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, December 18, 1946, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1946-12-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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PROTEST MEETING
SCHEDULED TODAY
New York Speaker To Ad
dress Session Here On
Sugar Question
With W. Eugene Edwards, local
feed wholesaler, scheduled to be
their chairman, more man 100 Oi
this section’s merchants, feed deal
ers and Chamber of Commerce
executives will gather in the coun
tv courthouse this afternoon to
plan a campaign through which
they hope to eliminate threats of
a continued shortage of sugar in
Sout'-eastern North Carolina.
Edwards will introduce Clenn
Bond, vice president of Lamborn
and Comp- y, New York sugar
brr s, who is expected to con
centrate his fire on reported plans
of United Nations feed consultants
to continue rationing of sugar to
American users in order to build
up its foreign consumption.
John H. Farrell, city industrial
agent, said yesterday that he is
expecting delegations from the
area within a 100-mile radius of
Wilmington.
The meeting is open to the public.
ROYAL WELCOME
GREETS ST. NICK
Continued From Page One
times to Santa’s dismay, who evi
dently wished only to be rewarded
with a moment’s silence so that
greetings could be passed along to
hi.c well-wishers.
His message, when delivered,
was that he wished for all the chil
*dren of Wilmingtop a very Merry
Christmas and promised to visit
them again come December, 1947.
After fined good-byes and person
al greetings to as many as possi
ble, Saint Nicholas continued on
his journey south, leaving thou
sands of Wilmington youngsters
convinced that Santa Claus does
come to those who faithfully wait.
Following departure of the spe
cial train bearing Santa, J. E. L.
Wade, who was in charge of the
arrangements for the celebration,
was enthusiastic over the success of
the event.
"It was even better than we
had hoped for," he said
He expressed his appreciation for
the cooperation of the Atlantic
Coast Line railroad and to the
crew of the train which brought
the man-of-the-hour to Wilmington.
The crew of Engine 1211 which
brought the special into town, was
composed of engineers A. Harrell,
fireman John Whitaker, conductor
R. A. Elmore and J. V. Hensen, H.
E. Boykin and Jimmie Wade.
GIVES THEM WARMTH
Birds fluff out their feathers
loosely in cold weather since by so
doing they capture air in the loose
down, which acts as insulation to
keep them warm.
TRY OUR
SUPERB FOOD
DELICIOUSLY
PREPARED
DELIGHTFULLY
SERVED
Dinner From $1.25
LARRY TAYLOR’S MUSIC
mmm a mm m
Reservations now on sale
for gala New Year’s Eve
party at the Jewel Box and
the Young Men’s Shop.
THE “PLANTATION
SUPPER CLUB
Dial 9413 - Car. Bch.‘Rd.
New Mail Service
NEW YORK, Dec. 17.—(U.»—
Test flights of helicopter airmail
service carrying both letters and
packages win start Jan. 6.on three
routes in the New York city area,
it was announced Tuesday.
Gael E. Sullivan, Second assist
ant postmaster general, said per
manent helicopter service may be
established by the middle of next
year.
He said that one of the prelimi
nary routes will extend from La
Guardia field to Westchester coun
ty, Stamford and South Norwalk,
Conn. Another will extend into
Nassau and Suffolk counties of New
York state and a third will drop
mail at New Jersey points.
CITY EXPENSES
WITHIN BUDGET
Continued From Page One
costs as far below budget esti
mates as feasible.
Benson was speaking on the eve
of the opening of bids on some
$525,000 of new construction, the
bulk of it in the lately-annexed
city areas.
High bids by private contractors
have previously frustrated the
city’s attempts to let contracts for
installation of water and sewer
pipe, and today’s bid opening is ex
pected to provide something like a
final answer to whether the city
can carry out the program though
private agencies.
Financially, Wilmington is func
tioning at close quarters, but there
are at least two facts that need to
be mentioned in any current dis
cussion of its fiscal picture.
The city’s long-run position is so
sound that it is one of the only two
North Carolina municipalities
whose bonds are accepted by the
banks of New York for trust
estates.
What is more, it is continuing to
expand its facilities in the face of
soaring contractors’ costs which
have stymied most other cities.
The International City Managers
Association reported Saturday that
in a survey of seventeen leading
municipalities nearly all reported
curtailed construction because .of
nearly 100 per cent increases in
buildihg costs.
Muskegon. Mich., for example,
has suspended work on a sewage
disposal plant after finding lhat
the project would cost $900,000 as
against original estimates of $500.
000.
Bartlesville, Okie., is facing
water rationing next spring be
cause it could not meet the costs
of a new pumping station.
High Point was reported by the
city managers’ group to have cur
tailed an ambitious public works
program.
And. even with curtailed con
struction, seven of the 17 cities
surveyed have raised taxes this
year. The association reported that
at least three others had increased
their revenues by higher property
valuations.
CALLING ALL SEWING
MACHINES
OLYMPIA, Wash. (U.R)— A house
wife with a shortwave radio is evi
dently convinced of the advertis
ing abilities of the Washington
state patrol radio system. A letter
was received which read: “Please
announce that I want to buy a
sew’ing machine, either poratble
or cabinet.”
TELLING IT TO THE MARINE
BOSTON (U.R)— While convalesc
ing in a naval hospital, former
Marine Cpl. Joseph Glynn re
ceived more than 10,000 letters
from well-wishers.
PUT OUT OF REACH
In Anglo, Portuguese West Af
rica, natives wrap their food sup
ply in grass, bind it, and attach the
mushroom-shaped bulk to the top of
a pole, to protect it from foraging
fowls and pigs.
80UNDID 1840
PARK & TILFORD
RESERVE
Emergency Fund Sought
By District Engineers
1 - ”
Recommendations that an emer
gency allotment of $95,000 ' be
granted to the Wilmington district,
army engineers, for emergency re
storation of the Cape Fear river
channel has been made to the divi
sion engineer in Atlanta.
A spokesman for the local engi
neers office said yesterday that the
need for this amount is immediate
and pointed out that the channel
is shoaling up at the present time
at a rapid rate.
All dredging on channel projects
in the area was suspended several
weeks ago due to a lack of funds
and unless the amount recorti
mended is alloted, then prospects
for restoring the waterways to a
depth of 30 feet are dim, the of
ficial said.
Final ^ction on the request to
the Atlanta office is expected in
early January. If the request is
approved, two dredges will be
placed on the bar off Southport
and in the inner channel scon
thereafter for operations, the
spokesman said.
The $95,000 allotment, plus the
funds ‘scrapped up” here, would
.give a total of $125,000. This would
provide for operation of the sea
going dredge, Hoffman, .on the bar
for a period of six weeks, during
which time the depth would be
restored to 30 feet, end the pipe
line dredge, Huston, would be
operated on the worst shoals in
the channel for a month. Restora
tion of the project depth, it was
said, would not be to standard
width.
The officials pointed out that the
relief would be temporary in na
ture and expressed the hope'that,
probably in May, the allotment for
the next fiscal year would be avail
able. \
Recommendations calling for
work at Morehead City, similar to
the emergency operations on the
Cape Fear, and temporary main
tenance on the North Carolina link
of the inland waterway are sched
uled to be presented to the divi
sion office within' the near future.
The project depth of the canal is
12 feet but the engineers plan a
ten-foot depth for the time being.
The shortage of funds in the dis
trict has resulted in the unemploy
ment of approvimately 150 per
sons. The majority are dredge
crew members but the personnel
of some survey parties is included
in the forced lay-off, it was re
ported.
DELIBERATIONS
SUFFER DELAY
Continued From Page One
ly concerned with achieving a
unanimous decision on the pro
posals, and for this reason, he said,
more time to study them was de
sirable. He charged that there
were certain aspects of the pro
posals — including provisions for
sanctions—which actually were in
violation of the United Nations
charter—and added that many
questions concerning the resolu
tion which had been asked by the
Soviet delegation still were un
answered. He said he was “not
quite clear” how the United States
wanted to implement these pro
posals.
American Plan
In essence, tha United States
plan called for “a strong and
comphensive international system
of control of atomic energy” es
tablished by convention among the
United Nations members. It
stipulated that such a treaty would
set up an international authority
with power to administer treaty
provisions and to deal with all
aspects of the atomic problem.
Under the American proposal,
the treaty would guarantee that
authority representatives would be
unhampered by any nation in their
entrance and departure for viola
tion inspections.
The American plan would pro
hibit manufacture, possession and
use of atomic weapons, would call
for destruction of existing stocks of
atom bombs; would require reports
on violations by the authority to
the security council and the signa
tory nations, and would place
punishment outside the pale of the
veto power.
Majority Favor*
A majority of the commission
members expressed approval of
the American plan. However, the
issue raised by Gromyko—that a
vote Tuesday might threaten
unanimity later—found some sup
port. China’s Dr. Quo Tai-Chi
supported the underlying principles
of the Baruch proposal, but said he
hoped unanimity would be
achieved.
Australia and Egypt expressed
unqualified approval of the plan.
Australian delegate Paul Hasluck
said that the disarmament resolu
tion of the General assembly ap
parently covered the fundamental
questions involved and that the
commission now should be pre
pared to proceed to the next phase
of its mission.
However, Gromyko asserted that
the. assembly had not gone into the
veto problem at all, adding that the
only way the assembly could have
achieved unanimity was through
avoidance of that issue. He cau
tioned gaainst "rushing” with the
proposals, saying that the Ameri
can.delegation had nqt given afl the
explanation necessary on some of
the atomic energy proposals.
Baruch Speaks
Baruch, presenting his proposals,
asked that they "be acted upon at
this time.”
“We have accepted the duty, and
we must proceed promptly to its
fulfillment," he said. “We believe,
and our work follows this belief,
that the best way of gaining our
objective is to do first things first.
In th every forefront of that effort
lies the control of atomic energy.
If we are able satisfactorily to
solve that vast problem, the others
.will come easier."
Baruch insisted that the com
mission had debated long enough,
and that the time had come for
action. He urged the commission
“to present an immediate, a prac
tical and a realistic program.
Theodore Roosevelt, at 48, was
the youngest man ever to be presi
dent of the United States.
BENSON TO ASK
COUNCIL TO GRANT
DEC. 26 HOLIDAY
The Wilmington City Council will
be asked today to consider making
Thursday, Dec. 26, a holiday for
its employees.
yesterday that a survey indicates
City Manager J. R. Benson said
that banks, real estate offices, fed
eral and county buildings, and most
stores will observe the post-Christ
mas holiday.
He plans to as the council
whethe it wishes ot follow suit this
morning.
COUNCIL TO GET
PARKING REPORT
Continued From Page One
$525,000 worth of city improve
ments including water and sewer
line installation in the newly-an
nexed areas, a $200,000 paving pro
gram, and a $125,000 water storage
tank.
(2) Passage of an ordinance
limiting solicitation of fares by
taxi drivers.
(3) Reception of a delegation
from the Wilmington Community
Council asking that the city sup
port its plans for establishment of
a combined juvenile and domestic
relations court here.
(4) Decision on the application
of the B. and T. Butane company
to construct an $8000 storage plant
near the North Carolina Shipbuild
ing company.
(5) Hearing of a request from F.
W. Spencer, operator of a Wil
mington-Castle Hayne bus line, to
make more than one stop within
the city.
Mayor W. Ronald Lane said last
night that he has not yet com
pleted appointment of a zoning
board.
NEHRU PROPOSES
INDIA REPl E
Continued From Page One
the effect of slamming the door
ot the Assembly on the Moslem
league, which to date has boycot
ted the Assembly on grounds that
the Congress was planning to tor
pedo Moslem demands for home
rule.
“This resolution of Nehru’s is
bound to have the effect of keep
ing the Moslem league out,” said
Dr. Ambedkar.
The only way to resolve the dif
ferences between the Moslem
league and the Congress party is
through negotiations, he added, and
the alternative is an open war.
If War Comes
"If war comes in this country
and that war has any relation to
the issue with which we are con
fronted, it will not be a war on the
British, but on the Moslems,” Dr.
Ambedkar said. ‘‘Probably worse,
it will be a war on the British and
Moslems combined.”
The possibility of war also was
raised by U Saw, former premier
of Burma, who said in Calcutta
that "whether there will be a civil
war in India is for Indians to de
cide, not for foreigners.”
U Saw (the "U” means Reverend
Sir), a member of the Burmese in
terim government, urged the Unit
ed States, as the "leader of democ
ratic countries of the world," to
help other nations attain freedom
and show the way to world-wide
democracy.
The Burmese leader was released
last January by the British after
having been- in custody for four
years on charges of conspiring with
the Japanese.'
Although India officially is at ,
peace, communal fighting between I
Along The Cape Fear
Continued From Page On*
held on Sunday, November 30,
1859.
According to the local historians
this institution gave the gospel and
religious' songs to the men who go
down to the sea in shipt tor almost
60 years.
Many an interesting story could
>
be told about the Seamen’s Bethel.
When, you stop to realize that
men of all nationalities, all de
grees of learning and all faiths
came to worship in the Seamen's
Bethel here you immediately see
the poignant dramas, large and
small, that must have originated
in the Port City
CHERRY APPOINTS
UMSTEAD TO POST
Continued From Page One
rhage last Saturday night, relapsed
into a coma, and died Sunday
morning.
His funeral services here Mon
day were attended by a host of
state officials and politicians led
by Governor Cherry and by dele
gations from both houses of Con
gress.
Umstead’s appointment to suc
ceed Bailey ended two days of in
tense speculation over whom the
Governor would name to fill the
vacant Senate seat. Wilkins P.
Horton of Pittsboro, former lieu
tenant governor and a prominent
figure in Governor Cherry’s cam
paign headquarters, also had been
mentioned as a serious contender
for the post.
The naming; of Umstead, how
ever, was greeted by many ad
ministration supporters with heart
felt egressions of relief. Prior
to Bailey’s death Umstead had
been regarded as a serious con
tender for the governorship in
1948 along with another administra
tion stalwart, State Treasurer
Charles M. Johnson. Democratic
leaders in recent weeks have made
no bones of the reluctance with
which they faced the prospect of
having to choose between the two
men.
The appointment also was fraught
with possibilities for the political
future of former Gc---rnor J
Melville Broughton. The latter has
been considered as an avowed can
didate for the Senatorship for
several months, and a hotly-fought
campaign in 4948 between Brough
ton and Umstead is now regarded
as almost definitely in the cards.
The new Senator is 51 years old.
He was bom in Durham county
in 1895 and has made Durham
his home all his life.
He graduated from the Univer
sity of North Carolina in 1916 and
taught school at Kinston until May
of 1917 when he entered the Army.
He was in uniform until April of
1919, having served eight months
overseas with the AEF.
Returning to Durham, he studi
ed law at Trinity college — now
Duke university, and entered into
the practice of law at Durham in
the fall of 1919.
His first public office was as
prosecuting attorney in the Dur
ham county Recorder’s court, a
post he held from 1922 until 1926.
In 1927, he was elected solicitor
of the 10th Judicial district and
served as solicitor until 1933 when
he was elected to Congress.
In the National House of Repre
sentatives, Umstead was chairman
of the House sub-committee on ap
propriations for the Navy depart
ment.
Umstead is a trustee of the
University of North Carolina and
has served as president of the
University Alumni association. For
seven years he served as com
mander of the Durham post of
the American Legion. He has
taught a Bible class at Trinity
Methodist church in Durham for
many years and for four years
was chairman of the church’s
board of stewards.
Hp is the son of John W. and
Lulie Lumsford Umstead. His
father was a confederate soldiei
and a member of the state legisla
ture in 1897. He married Miss
Merle Davis of Rutherford coun
ty, and they have one daughter,
Merle Bradlev Umstead, who is
four years old.
BROUGHTON WILL
ENTER 1948 RACE
RALEIGH, Dec. 17. — W -
Sources close to former Governor
J. Melville Broughton, when in
formed Tuesday that Governor
Cherry had appointed W. B. Um
stead of Durham to the U. S. Sep
ate succeeding the late Joslah W.
Bailey, said that they knew defi
nitely that Broughton would be a
candidate against Umstead in
1948. , ,
Broughton told close friends here
for many months (hat he would
be a candid-1- for the Senate.
The former governor, who re
turned Tuesday from a trip to
the West Coast where he attend
ed a meeting of the Farm Bureau
federation, said that he had learn
ed of the aDpointment. He refused
to comment on . the appointment
except to pay high personal tr
ute to Umstead. _
Moslems arid Hindus this year has
-esulted in thousands of deaths.
Five thousand persons were Kill
ed in Calcutta alone last August,
and the year’s death toll in Bom
jay is approaching 1,000. No ac
:urate figures are available for
smaller communities. _
DELCO THEATRE 1
DELCO, N. C.
LAST DAY
THE TEEN AGERS
“JUNIOR PROM”
With
June Prieser - Freddie Stewart
Also
Cartoon & Comedy
Shows 7 & 9 P. M.
, TODAY ONLY
Show at 7!«0 T. m.
JANE DARWELL
EDGAR KENNEDY
• —in—
'TUGBOAT ANNIE"
Also: Selected Short Subjects
Rev. J. H. McCracken,
Former Minister Here,
Dies At Durham Home
DURHAM, Dec. 17— (JP)—Follow
ing a long illness, the Rev. J. H.
McCracken, 83, retired Methodist
minister, died at his home here
Tuesday. He had been a member
of the North Carolina conference
for 49 years, having served pas
torates in Durham, Raleigh, Wil
mington, Washington, Elizabeth
City, Beaufort, and Yanceyville.
The Rev. Mr. McCracken attend
ed Guilford college and was a
graduate of Trinity College. For
six years he was principal -of
Caldwell Institute in Orange coun
ty. He had been retired for 11
years, making his home here.
Funeral services will be held
in Durham at 11 o’clock Thursday
morning.
CHAMBER BLASTS
CIO WAGE PLANS
Continued From Page One
"The people of the country now
know that this (argument) was
not true. And I am convinced that,
this time, the public will be hesi
tant to' swallow this new predic
tion based on the same reasoning
as was used before."
Jackson took exception to Mur
ray’s statement in Pittsburgh,
where the big three CIO unions
are determining wage policy, in
which Murray called for “peaceful
settlement’’ of the new demands
and said that “it is up to the in
dustrialists’’ whether a new wave
of strikes is to be avoided.”
“In other words,” said Jack
son, “unless management agrees to
everything Mr. Murray demands,
then management will be to blame
for the strikes which Mr. Murray
will call. /
“It’s just as logical as though a
highwayman said* to his victim,- ’if
you don’t hand over your money
i’ll have to snoot you — and it will
be your fault.’
“In spite of the elaluorately fash
ioned report of the CIO hired econ
omist— recently in the government
employ — labor officials must
know that a second round of wage
increases will compel closely cor
responding price increases in the
months ahead. Indeed, such in
creases may force both labor and
goods out of the market.”
BITING COLD WAVE
BLANKETS NATION
Continued From Page One
years. The temperature at Daw
son, in the Yukon Territory, rose
from an unofficial 70 degrees be
low zero to 40 below Monday, and
schools reopened.
Near blizzard conditions added
seven inches of snow in 24 hours
in sections of Minnesota, Wiscon
sin and Northern Michigan. Some
snow also was reported in extreme
northern Texas.
Duluth, Minn., was whipped by a
17-hour gale Monday night, with
velocity up to 70 miles an hour.
The violent wind and four-foot
snowdrifts grounded airplanes end
delayed trains up to three hours
behind schedules.
The snowfall at Ely, Minn., mea
sured 15 inches and temperatures
were down to 15 below at Virginia,
Minn. A dozen rural schools were
closed, buses were delayed and a
64-year-old woman was found on
her porch, dead of exposure.
Iodine, commonly used as an
antiseptic, is now being used as the
active material in a storage bat
tery.
★ Today And Tomorrow ★
The TIME To See
«
I»—12:05—S :05—6:05—8:05
—Algo—.
Time: U:05—2:00—5:05—8:00
Ok
REPORTERS FEAR
MOSCOW CURTAIN
Continued From Page One
Paris an New York, the -wsmen
asked Byrnes if Molotov intended
to make those changes.
They also wanted to know if
Byrnes planned to talk c-er the
matter with Molotov and make
specific arrangements for press
coverage.
Byrnes ignored both questions.
Instead, he read back the state
ment Molotov made at New York
on December 9 when he asked the
Soviet Foreign minister for as
surance that the press would be
permitted to report on the Moscow
conference.
Molotov’s statement was confin
ed to generalities, to the effect
that everything would be done to
provide accomodations for the
newsmen and to facilitate their
work. *
! A Thrilling Story of 1
I An Outlaw Horse! |
Added
A Pete Smith Novelty
DECISION DELAYED
BY COMMISSION ON
SHIPYARD IN CITY
WASHINGTON, Dec. 17_w
The Maritime commission deter-'e'
action- Tuesday on disposal of
Nt°r^-,Ca.r0lina Ship Buildl:>g yam,
at Wilmington, N. C. ar“‘
Earlier, aides of Senator w™
(D-NC) had said that if a decV^
was reached Tuesday they did not
expect it to be announced imrn,
diately, '
A half million children a-e a,
«rted> °r Jeft on doorstep!;
throughout the world annually
I prtiijp*
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a Breth taking thrills
Jl and action!
ZANE
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“ROLL ALONG
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I—With—
SMITH BALLEW |
I I I
Final Thrill Packrd Chap
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