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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, January 10, 1947, Image 13

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-01-10/ed-1/seq-13/

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New Research Building
To Be Constructed Here
immediate plan* for the con
llction of a brick or concrete
ifce-iaboratory building to be
dced by the North Carolina Agricul
tural Experiment station and lo
ed about four miles north of
Wilmington on the Castle Haynes
-o id were announced yesterday by
,‘he vegetable Research laboratory
Di J- M. Jenkins, horticulturist
nhai-ae of the station made
k, mvn that the building is estimat
p, to cost S8.000 and will be located
entrance to the present site
f the laboratory, on a 50-acre
!r',,Ll,viH consist of two offices, two
:-oratory rooms, a utility room.
,';:d toilet facilities. The Budget
r -eau has completed the _ plans
.specifications for this building.
tvDlYienkins said that because of
the difficulty in obtaining neces
sary equipment it will probably be
next fall before much field work
can be done on the laboratory
grounds proper.
Until adequate farm equipment
has ^ been obtained most of the
work will be done on farms in this
area in cooperation with local
vegetable and bulb growers.
The personnel of the laboratory
will for the present, consist of
Dr. Jenkins, a clerk-technician, and
day labor as required. Later, as
the laboratory developes its pro
gram, a plant pathologist, soil
technician, and possibly others
may be added to the staff to sup
ply a growing need for agricultural
research and development in this
part of the state.
Persons wishing to have samples
of soil tested may now leave them
at the office of the laboratory. Dr.
Jenkins said that they will be
fumigated apd then forwarded *o
the Soil Testing Division, of the
State Department of Agriculture
for testing.
The laboratory expects to work
on practically any problems that
may arise in connection with the
production of vegetable crops oj
bulbs. Some of the first projects
will include tests of new varietil s
and the selection ot. those best
adapted to local conditions; studies
and adaptation of methods of con
trolling diseases that have caused
serious losses to growers in years
past; rest of new chemicals for the
stimulation of plant growth and for
control of weeds; and the de
velopment of more economical
methods of production by the use
of methods and materials that have
been worked out at other stations.
“The Wilmington area has a
wonderful opportunity to develop
still further as a leading vegetable
and bulb producing section,” said
Dr. Jenkins,” and the laboratory
hopes to play an important part
in this development by testing and
developing new methods and new
materials for the use of growers
in this part of North Carolina.”
The average truck in the United
States pays nearly four times as
much to state governments as the
average passenger car in license
fees, and twice as much in gaso
line taxes.
7Ujou'lt £uuj fov cuuJJ- ttouj Sifdt
Cjcu, taste Hj(/ AtlLcicruA
^ fUoW of
cMUQraths
iVEGETABLE SOUP
This one 1 call ‘Complete Contentment’ — symbol of all the
folks who voted Quaker Oat* America’s Beet-Tasting Cereal 1”
„ ,C erlcans lust voted one
cereal best-tasting! In an independ
;n*\ national breakfast survey to
nna America's favorite for flavor,
more people named Quaker Oats
named any other cereal,
deHciousf0 ! It>S nut'tasty*
And Quaker Oats helps you fight
igue, helps the youngsters growl
Real authorities agree not one
other natural cereal equals hot,
whole-grain oatmeal in four great
key elements—Protein. Food-iron,
Food-Energy, Vitamin Bi!
Get the double advantage of
famous flavor, famous
beneiits, every day!
Quick Quaker Oats
cooks fast as coffee.
_“uaker Oats sgfc,
I-~ --- --
FASHION DESIGNERS
CALLED ‘FIENDISH’
They Make Women Unhap
py, Men Poor, Society
Reporter Discloses
By SARA YOKLEY
United Press Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK, Jan. 9.- (U.P) --
Fashion designers are fiendish
people. Their chief delight is in
making most of the women un
happy most of the time and throw
ing husbands into bankruptcy.
_Shackled in their Seventh ave
nue designing chambers they have
been busily devising new ways to
torture women and husbands
alike. The results are highly suc
cessful. Every stitch of clothing
that , was modish last spring will
be as up to date as a T-model
Ford come Easter.
Remember those slim, hip-hug
ging skirts the little woman wore
last spring? Well, forget ’em,
mister. This season they’re wear
ing full swirling skirts — with
pleats. Pleats in front, pleats be
hind, pleats all around. In wool
dresses and suits they’re one inch
wide or more while in dressy
sheers they’re tiny delicate ac
cordian pleat's.
And what’s more, unless Mi
lady’s a midget, she won’t have
enough hem in last season’s skirts
to let them out the prescribed two
inches.
Give Them Away
Thumb through the closet and
take a gander at the jackets of
last spring’s suits — exaggerated
Dolman sleeves and no collars.
Forget those too. Give them away.
Make dust clothes out of them.
This years things are just the op
posite— somewhat narrow sleeves
and tremendous dandy • like col
lars.
If there’s a barebosom dress
hanging in the closet, it might
have possibilities—turn it around
and you’re in style again. For this
spring the cantankerous clothes
designers are swathing women to
the,neck in front and baring love
ly white backs.
One of the chief pluggers for
the accordian pleated skirt is
Adele Simpson, who even whips
up a dainty peplum on a black
crepe sheer dress from these in
tricate pleats.
Maurice Rentner is the princi
pal booster of the oversized collar
and revers. He claims he was in
spired by the reign of George IV
| of England and has created an
entire collection of suits on the
regency theme.
Hard On Purse
Typical of the •■gentlemen’s
suit” by Rentner is a navy wool
with three-quarter length cutaway
jacket. The collar and revers are
so large they almost frame the
face—flattering, but hard on the
pocketbook.
Designer Ben Reig will take his
cccktail dresses wrapped tight to
I the neckline this season and cut
| low in the back. One startling
model in sheer black crepe had
a full skirt with intricate drapery
and a molded bodice. Demure in
deed until the wearer turns
around and shows inches and
inches of back.
EXCHANGE CLUB
TO HEAR SPEECH
BY HENRY BOYD
Members of the Wilmington Ex
change club will hear an address
by Henry E. Boyd, executive direc
tor of the Wilmington Port-Traffic
association at a Jan. 15 meeting
'n the Friendly cafeteria, it was
learned here yesterday.
Boyd postponed an earlier speech
to the club members, the report
said.
The Jan. 15 address will outline
the part American railroads play
ed in bringing World War II to an
-•arly end. Boyd has figures on
the number of miles of track, the
actual number of coach and sleep
er trips, and the number of troops
moved by the nation’s railroads
during the war.
Adult Delinquency
CHARLOTTE, Jan. '9. — (JP) —
Statistical note: 1,301 marriage
licenses were issued in Mecklen
burg county during 1946; divorces
granted tota’led 782.
Judge F. M. Redd of Juvenile
court attributed the bulk of the di
vorces to what he called “adult
delinquency.”
Dial 2-3311 For Newspaper Service
Serving the People of Wilmington for More
Than a Quarter of a Century with:—
GRADE “A”
LACTIC ACip WHOLE MILK — BUTTERMILK
PASTEURIZED MILK — CREAM
Produced and processed on our own dairy farm and plant from a dairy
herd scientifically fed and personally cared for to produce the best quality
milk.
Leeuwenberg Dairy
OTTO LEEUWENBERG, Owner
Phone 2-3834 or 4667 Market Street Road
i Tender and
Meaty
35c ib.
COLONIAL UNSWEETENED
GRAPEFRUIT
JUICE - 21
Your Choice of Two Grades and Two
Prices On Quality Beef
PRIME RIB
ROAST
(Thick Cut)
AA or A B Grade
53' 45c
CHUCK
ROAST
(Square Cut)
AA or A B Grade
43' 39'
ASPARAGUS ca7oupus V 13*
VEGETABLES gi,,smixeb 13*
SAUER KRAUT — 2 *2 25*
DATE AND NUT DUBREA Daks 1c.nZ' 2S*
APRICOTS EVAP. s. 49‘
^7 _
#
PofiaoES
5-U, X3^3^===—\
curettes s5...-\ —
Cl *v»
PREMIUM CRACKERS St 25*
DI71 ICU * RITTER'S 12J-0z.«OC$
l\CiLB9n CHILI SAUCE Bottle fcW
DILL CHIPS £5 r 19*
TOMATOES STANDARD r 19*
STALEY'S zr r -11c
PEACHES evap. 35*
2lbs....25c i
BEANS 2 lbs.. 29c s__/ j
NSW CROPFLORIDA GRKN CALIF. ICEBERG I i
CABBAGE 2lbs..gc lettuce j
Florida juicy 2 lg. hds._25c I
ORANGES'^ 39c 1 2 m8i-Ms- -17t I j
NEW CROP GREEN MUSTARD oi TURNIP FRESH CUBAN
SALAD 2 lbs. . 25c J Pineapples j
FRESH FULL OF MILK
COCOANUTS Ik. 8' ea.Z5e
_I
FLORIDA SWEET \
TANGERINES S 39. i
f
PRUNES ^ 49*
DETAIL! fruit m-oi. OCkC
I I Southland Fountain Jar Xi^I
AAD|y PARIS GOLDEN No. 2 1 7^
vURIl SWEET CREAM Can *1
nfAI ARTESIAN No. 2 \ "T 0
B LHW LARGE SWEET Can XI
MOTT’S fi£ 26*
-1 PARSON’S
CUT-RITE TOMATO
WAXED CATSUP
PAPER VINEGAR
RAINBOW
2 9^ MOPS Each 39c
Rolls ^ 1 v PINTO
* BEANS i-Lb. ca„o 23c
OUR PRICE WHEN AVAILABLE
LUX FLAKES
Med. Pkg. Lge. Pkg.
15. 35«
OUR PRICK WHEN AVAILABLE
RINSO
Med. Pkg. Lge. Pkg.
14* 34*
OUR PRICE WHEN AVAILABLE
LIFEBUOY
SOAP
2 c*k~ 20*
OUR PRICE WHEN AVAILABLE
LUX TOILET
2 se 20*
.
AMMONIA £
HURT'S 46-Oz. AC
JUICE Can AH'
CROSSE AND 14-Oz. OOO
BLACKWELL Bottle A
M0TT’S Bot". l8C
NORTHERN
TISSUE
3 ro11* 17°
TOWELS
Roll \ Q*

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