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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, March 14, 1947, Image 6

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Country Club
Master Point
Tourney Held
The Master Point duplicate con
tract bridge tournament was hela
this week at the Cape Fear Coun
try club for members under the
direction of Mrs. Sam Nash, Jr.
Scoring high for North-South
were Mrs. L. Paul Campbell and
Mrs. J. S. Zapf, while second high
for North-South were Mrs. Charles
Becker and Mrs. Harry Stovall.
Turning in high scorer# for East
West were Mrs. Louis Orrell and
Mrs. Norwood Orrell. with Mrs.
A. R. Willis and Mrs. Donald King,
•econd high.
Those playing in the tournament
were:
Mrs. P. R. Smith. Capus Way
nick of Raleigh, Mrs. R. Bryant
Hare, Jr., Mrs. Oliver C. Hutaff.
Mrs. L. Paul Campbell. Mrs. J. S.
Zapf, Mrs. Harry Wellott, Mrs. A
B. Cheatham.
Mrs. Frank M. Ross. Mrs. du
Brutz Poisson, Mrs. Charles Beck
er, Mis. Harry Stovall. Mrs. Mary
Nixon Hardwicke. Miss Elizabeth
Hardwicke. Charles Blake. Tom
James, Mrs. Dalziel Sprunt, Mrs.
J. Frank Hackler.
Colonel Beverly C. Snow and
Mrs. Snow. Mrs. A. R. Willis. Mrs.
Donald King, Mrs. 0. L. Hogon,
Mrs. Charles Lowrimore. Mrs.
Walter Curtis, Mrs. Louis Hanson,
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Hines, Mrs.
Louis Orrell, Mrs. Norwood Orrell.
Miss Jane LeGrand and Miss Daisy
Lee Woodbury.
This tournament is held every
fifth week.
Wilmington Does
Attending Meet
In Charlotte
The local officers of the BPO
Does have been invited to attend
im installation ceremony by the
Charlotte chapter No. 31 to be held
this evening.
Those from Wilmington who will
leave this morning include:
Mrs. Fred Coleman, president:
Mrs. Kurt Boehm, secretary; Mrs
Sara Allen, conductor; Mrs. A. B
Blake, outer guard; and Mrs. Lis
ton Trulove, assistant conductor.
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soc
KAY GOODMAN ' SOCIETY EDITOR
Joseph Fuchs,
Violinist, Will
Play March 24
The final concert of the season
I to be presented bv the Wilming
I ton Community Concert associa
tion will be that of Joseph Fuchs,
I violinist, who is to appear here m
j a recital on Monday evening,
I March 21 at 9 o'clock in the au
ditorium of New Hanover High
school.
Mr. Fuchs has been heard many
times over the various nation-wide
radio hookups and has played
with top symphonies, he has also
been heard on the Sunday aftei
noon Longine Symphony program.
As customary admittance is by
membership card only; however
all cards are transferrable.
PERSONALS
Maj. Gen. Frederic H. Smith
and Mrs. Smith of Hampton. Va.,
and Capt. Roger Williams and
Mrs. Williams of Newport News.
Va.. will arrive today to spend
the week-end as the guests of Mr.
and Mrs. J. Laurence Sprunt at
their home, Orton Plantation,
Brunswick county. General Smith
is former commander of Camp J
Davis.
Mrs. Bernard Flynn and two
child en, Bernie and Mary, have
re tinned to their home on Market
street after a visit to Mrs. Flynn’s
mother - in - law, Mrs. Cornelius
Flynn of Ilion, N. Y. Mrs. Flynn’s
husband is stationed at Mitchel
Field, Lor. Island.

G. W. Martin. Jr., and daughter.
Mrs. W. G. Evans, II, have gone
to Whitakers to attend the funeral
of their mother and grandmother,
Mrs. G. W. Martin.
BIRTHS
GEORGE THOMAS DAVIS. JR.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Davis an
nounce the birth of a son, George
Thomas Davis, Jr., on March 9 at
Marion Sprunt annex. Mrs. Davis
is the former Mary Lib Clark of
Wilson.
The now familiar DDT, Di
choro-DiphPhyl - Trichloroethane,
was discovered in 1874 by Oth
mar Zeidler, a Swiss chemical
student. The formula was over
looked until 1939. when the
Swiss government used it to
fight a plague of potato bugs. It
war later released to the U. S.
Army Medical Corps, which de
veloped it as the most effective
weapon against typhus and other
insect-borne plague.
The Mulligan Letters, written
between James G. Blaine and
Warren Fisher, from 1864 to
1872, on railroad matters, are
said to have greatly harmed the
candidacy of Blaine for the pres
idency in 1884.
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CEREALS • MEATS • VEGETABLES • FRUITS • DESSERTS
TODAY'S GARDEN-GRAPH
t CHINESE C-HESTNUT
J northern
PECAN
/ AMERICAN
I -HAZELNUT
3-S-f
CHINESE
WALNUT
Why Not Plant A Few Nut Trees?
By DEAN HALLIDAY
Distributed by
Central Press Association
Fruit trees are frequently
planted on home grounds, but
why not include a few of the
newer nut trees in your planting
plans? They are uecorative and
in addition to their beauty they
will bear edible crops in two or
three years.
Ail nut trees do best when
planted in good garden soil.
Hickories, ha-’0' and pecans
ill do fairly well on so-calle
jjoor soil, hen . r, however,
that no varieties of nuts will
make satisiactory growth or pro
duce well on soil that is poorly
drained. r
Most varieties of nuts bear bet
ter if several trees of the same
sort are planted fairly close to
each other, as cross-pollination is
necessary to insure a good crop
of nuts.
European filberts and Ameri
can hazelnuts can be used to take
the place of tall hedges. When
used for hedge purposes you are
assured of good cross - pollination.
The American hazelnut bears fine
nuts of good size, one of which
is illustrated in the accompanying
Garden-Graph.
Also illustrated is the Chinese
chestnut. This variety does not
grow into trees of majestic size,
but it bears excellent nuts and is
highly resistant to the blight that
has nearly eliminated the Ameri
can chestnut. It is necessary to
plant two or more chestnut, not
over 25 feet apart, to insure a
crop of nuts. Burrs begin to form
five or six years after planting.
The northern hardy pecan, il
lustrated, is rapid growing and
makes a beautiful shade tree.
When it comes into bearing it
will yield nuts of delicious quality.
The Chinese walnut, illustrated,
is similar in size, shape and
flavor to the English walnut. It is
extremely winter hardy and will
produce a high yield of large nuts.
Sorosis Music Department
Presents Program At Clubhouse
Pupils from Mrs. Belcher’s
school of dance were presented
yesterday afternoon before North
Carolina Sorosis members and
invited guests when the Music de
. partment of the Federated club
! held the spring meeting in the
clubhouse. 116 North Third street,
under the chairmanship of Mrs.
Quincy B. Snipes.
The program began at 4 o’clock
and was most colorful and tune
fun with special dance numbers
being presented by the attractive
young dancers, costumes also were
most attractive and added to the
setting.
The afternoon's program was as
follows:
I. Salute to the Sorosis — Major
ettes Nancy Lanier and Carolyn
Murphree.
II. Studio Mascot in Military Tap
— Beth Troy.
III. Tiny Bits of Soft Shoe
Rhythm — Pug Stokley, Mar
garet Jane Batson. Vera Mae Hus
ton. Betsy Burney and Patsy
Kelly.
IV. Calico Kids — featuring Jay
Drynan in song with Betty Love
Garvie. Barbara McKee and
Betty Ann Bordeaux.
V. "Three Little Girls in Blue"—
featuring Mary Jane Summer.
Charlotte Jones and Mary Cox in
toe.
"Atlantic City Chorus" — Song
and waltz: Suzanne Newell. An
44 Praise Winner
7363
There’s triple pleasure in this fi
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one square repeated. You’ll -have
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These squares form exquisite
cloths, scarfs or smaller piece*.
Pattern 7363 has directions;
charts.
Our improved pattern — visual
with easy-to-see charts and photos,
and complete directions — makes
needlework easy.
Send TWENTY CENTS in coins
for this pattern to Wilmington
Morning Star Household Arts
Dept., 259 W.- 14th St., New York
11, N. Y. Print plainly NAME. AD
DRESS and PATTERN NUMBER.
Fifteen cents more brings you
our Needlework Book—104 illustra
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[ poiholders printed in the book.
nette Hardin, Jukie Seaton, Jean
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Pauline Kennedy. Gail Collins,
Jean Bagwell, Jean Newland,
Thea Fern Berlin, Emily Sessoms,
Anne Crabbs, Terry Ann Fountain,
Judy Gulledge and Penny Patrill,
VI. Little Smoothies in Swing
Tap — Joanne Tienken, Sara
Craig, Carolyn Murphree. Sandra
Copeland, Nancy Gail Evans, and
Sabra Ann Brew.
VII. Rushing the Season with
Beach Play — Acrobatic Soiree.
Patrick Merrit. Betty Tinken,
Betsy Kelly. Gwendolyn Hawley,
Angela Howard. Valeria Powell,
and Sandra Harper.
VIII. Teen Age Snoopin — Tap
in Style by Miss Jane Roper and
Gerhardt Whilden.
IX. Boogie Beat — featuring
Sam Huston and Tommie William
son in song, with the Slick
Chicks: Jerry Rich, Carol Bunch,
Ann Hatch, Betty Jean Sellers.
Lenora Sidbury, Jean O'Neal, and
Shirley Newton.
Chestnut School
Students Present
Musical Program
The Thursday Morning Music
club held the monthly program
meeting yesterday morning in St.
James Great Hall with Mrs.
Quincy B. Snipes and Mrs. Eric
Norden as leaders. The program
was presented by students from
the Chestnut Street school, mem
bers o< the juvenile and junior
music clubs of the city.
In connection with the program
Mrs. H. L. McPherson read a
most interesting paper on the fu
ture musicians of America.
Miss Geneva McCachern of the
Chestnut street school faculty,
presented the students who gave
the following program.
SUBJECT: Future Musicians.
1. Chestnut Street school Glee
club, Miss Geneva McCachern, di
rector.
a. The Rose Tree—Praetarius
b. Where God Hath Walked —
Mehul, (From the opera "Joseph”
c. Sleep, O Holy Child—French
Noel.
d. On the Shores of Git-Che
Gum-Mee, by Ira B. Wilson.
c. Hunting Song—Highland Folk
Tune.
2. Paper: Future Musicians—
Mrs. H. L. McPherson
3. Piano Solo—Catherine Crowe
Romance in F Major—Schumann
a. Piano — Barbara Bailey
(Chestnut Street School), Minuet
in G Major. Minuet in G Minor
—Bach. Venetian Boat Song No
2 Opus 36—Mendelssohn.
b. Tenor Voice, Bobby Melton.
To e End of the Road—Speaks
e. Piano, Patty Jones.
Accompanists: Miss Geneva Mc
Cachern, Barclay Brown and Pat
ty Jones.
Leaders: Laura Howell Norden
and Mrs. Quincy B. Snipes.
Scheduled to have appeared on
the program were Catherine
| Crowe, Genevieve Britt and James
Melton from the high school, but
were not present due to being ill
with flu.
During the business meeting
routine matters were discussed
and several announcements were
made by the president, Mrs. Con
rad Wessell Mrs. J. D. Loftis, Mrs.
C. H. Pfohl, Mrs. William Bellois
and Mrs. J. S. Zapf were recog
nized as new members of the club
while the names of Mrs. Key
Scales and Mrs. E. A. Gibson
: were read as new members.
' Thc highest federal erariP
ers"/”*1 aJm°St free of P111 feath
New Easter
Outfit Cost
AMere $75
By SARA YOKLEY
NEW YORK, March 15 — (U.R)
_ A complete new Easter outfit
from a bonnet to sandals will put
a dent of approximately $75 in
milady's Easter nest egg.
Comparison shopping for clothes
in the medium price range shows
that a woman must fork over the
tidy sum of $69 for a suit and all
the trimmings or $89 if she pre
fers a coat and dress ensemble. If
she wants the works — leather
rather than fabric gloves, a real
leather pocketbook and a pure
silk blouse — it will cost an ad
ditional $12.50.
Broken down, an average Easter
bill might look like this:
Suit: _ $40
Blouse: - 5
Hat: -- 6
Bag: ---- 5
Shoes: --- 10
Gloves: 1.50
Stockings: 1.50
$69.00
When a coat at $40 and a dress
at $25 are substituted for the suit
and blouse, the bill amounts to
$89. •
There is little difference in suit
prices this year as compared with
last, but the'fabrics are notice
ably finer — and there's more
fabric per suit, an outstanding
suit at $40 is the dressmaker cape
iet suit shown by Mack's. Made of
soft spring green wool, the suit
has a skirt slightly full and a
figure-hugging jacket buttoned to
the neck. Buttoned on at the
shoulders and the upper part of
the sleeve is a graceful capelet
in the front only.
Good quality rayon faille suits,
dressier but less versatile than
wool ones, come in black, navy
and brown at B. Altman's for
$40. The cutaway is the most pop
ular stive for faille suits, with V
nefck, trim revers and a full
rippling jacket behind.
Coats in the $40 field run the
range from fully swirling great
coats and peignoirs to short flar
ed jackets with the former usual
ly in darker colors and the jackets
in Easter-egg pastels.
Hats, which always steal the
show at Easter time, are sport
ing finer rayon flowers this sea
son than last for a smaller price
tag. The cheapest way to buy a
better grade Easter bonnet is to
pick out an untrimmed straw, pric
ed at Macy’s at $3, and add flow
ers, veiling and ribbons to suit
individual whims for an additional
$3
Beautifully made blouses of the
finest rayon fabrics are back on
the counters again at $5. One of
the best is a Macy copy of a
French original in pebble crepe
with long sleeves and pointed
tab neckline which fits perfectly
over a cardigan suit, this same
store offers a pure silk blouse with
a tie neckline and short sleeves for
the rock-bottom price of $9.
Dresses for $25 are more gen
erously cut and of better material
than for many a year. Tops is a
pure silk corn colored print with
a fitted torso line which breaks
into saucy pleats at the knee.
Russels is showing a classic
charmer with an uncluttered back
buttoned bodice, a bow-tied hipline
and a stitch pleated skirt. It
comes in navy and black tissue
faille .
Pocketbooks in the $5 range are
most satisfactory In hard-wear
ing black plastic patent, but are
shown also in failles and suede
cloth. real leather bags — calf,
saddle and suede, are more cost
ly and tire cheapest are found at
about $10.
Shoes, no longer hard to find,
and particularly good this sea
son in the closed pump styles, in
suedes, patents and brightly color
ed calf.
Fabric gloves are priced at
about $1.50, for either long or short
cuffs, while real leathers, both do
mestic and imported, have a $5
label.
The first clipper ship was de
I signed in 1843.
STETSON
HATS
Gibson's Haberdashery
North Front Street
Welcome to
H & W
Cafeteria
OPEN DAILY
(EXCEPT SUNDAY)
-HOURS
Breakfast _7:00 to 9:00
Lunch _ 11:48 to 2:15
Dinner _6:30 to 7:48
Under New Management
Doctor’s Discovery
FOR FLUSHING
KIDNEYS
• Backache, lots of pep, getting up nights,
and headache are often caused by nothing
more than improper kidney action due to
excess acid in the urine. Kidneys are one
j of Nature's ways of removing impurities
j from the blood. And when these impurities
j back up, trouble may start.
So if you have these troubles, give youi
. kidneys and bladder a good flushing out
j by taking Dr. Kilmer’s Swamp-Root* It
works on the kidneys to flush them out,
increasing the flow of urine to help relieve
that excess acidity and ease that burning
when you pass water, helps that bladder
station that gets you up nights.
Made of 16 herbs, roots, vegetables, and
balsams, Swamp-Root is absolutely non
habit forming. Caution: take as directed
For free trial supply, send to Dept. Z
Kilmer fit Co., Inc., Box 1255, Stamford
Conn. Or—get full-sized bottle of Swamp
Root today at your drugstore.
School Exhibit
At St. Mary’s
Well Received
St. Mary's School exhibit and
.Mothers and Teachers club meet
ing were held on Tuesday even
ing in the parish hall. Novel in
vitations were sent out to the
parents of the children and the
public was also invited to the ex
hibit which was on display from 7
until 9:30 o’clock.
The students and teachers, un
der the supervision of Sister Re
gus. principal, well deserved the
praises accorded them for pre
paring the fine exhibit. Ann Bid
dle, Rose Marie Pargeter and
Rosalind Picot, of the eighth
grade, acted as guides. Sharon
Jones was in charge of the regis
tration book. At 8 o’clock a short
business meeting was called by
Mrs. E. A. Boado, president.
Father O'Keefe opened the meet
ing with a prayer and also intro-,
duced Father Koch of New Bern,
guest speaker of the evening, who
is an authority on many phases of
education and spoke inspiringly on
the relations of the home and
school to each other in educating
and training the child. Other
special guests of the evening were
Rev. Mother Maura arid Sister
Aquinis of Sacred Heart Convent,
Belmont. Sister Aquinis is su
pervisor of schools taught by the
Sisters of Mercy.
At the close of the program
everyone was invited to remain
for refreshments which were ser
ved from a table beautifully ar
ranged with a lace cloth, silver
coffee service and yellow candles
and daffodills. The refreshments
were in charge of Mrs. Gordon
Doran assisted bv Mrs. E. D. Pat
rick and were served by Sharon
Jones and Carolyn Sonderman.
both eighth grade students. Father
Roche was in charge of the dec
orations and the officers of the
club Mrs. E. A. Boado. president,
Mrs. R. G. Redmayne. vice-pres
ident and Mrs. P. M. Hunt, sec
Dates To Remember
TODAY
8:00 p.m. — Regular meeting
of Stamp Defiance chapter
DAR with Misses Lathrop,
213 North Fifth street, Re
ports from delegates to state
conference in New Bern will
be made.
8:00 p. m.—The Foster Bible class
of the First Baptist church
retary, were responsible for the
invitations.
The exhibit was received with
such enthusiasm that it has been
decided to open the school to the
public again on Sunday afternoon
from 3 until 5:30 o’clock.
Dr. Paul S. Galtsoff. leading
shellfish biologist of the U S
Fish and Wildlife Service and
internationally known authority
in his field, was once sent to the
West Indies in 1939, by request
of the British government, when
a fatal blight struck sponge beds
there. He was to study the situa
tion and assist British scientists
in it correction.
Chest Colds
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