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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, May 10, 1947, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-05-10/ed-1/seq-3/

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generals tell
OFMAYREQl) 'S
JVo Top Ranking Wartime
Officers Testify At War
Fraud Trial
WASHINGTON, May 9. — (ff>\ _
Two top wartime generals said
today that Ex-C ongressman
Andrew J- May of Kentucky asked
them to help Garsson munitions
firms which .tie government con
tends held the wartime House
Military committee chairman in
their pay.
Gens. Brehon Somervell, retired
Army Service forces commander,
ft:id Eugene Keyuoic, former chief
0f Army engmeers, testified May
interceded with them about con
tract< lor the $78,000,000 Garsson
Brms-making empire.
After their appearance, the
prosecution turned to its charge
tha’ May sent a major general by
piane to Europe in April, 1945 to
deliver a letter to Gen. Dwight D.
Eisenhower interceding in a court
mania] of the son of a munitions
maker.
At the same time, the defense
disclosed that it has issued a sub
poena for Eisenhower, now Army
Chief of staff, to be a witness for
the 72-year-o 1 d May. William A.
paisley, chief prosecutor, told the
court he also may call Eisenhower
tut ropes to avoid it.
yiay is charged with taking
more than S50.000 in alleged bribes
for favors to the Garssons. On
tri3] with him for conspiracy to
pay the alleged bribes are Homy
and Murray Garsson and Josepn
y Freeman. Washington agent for
the Garsson brothers.
Body Contract
Somervell, now an executive of
tire Koppers Coke company. Pitts
burgh, said May asked him in
1943 to investigate a cutback in
£i- army contract for truck bodies
for the Eatavia (111 )Metal Pro
ducts company, a Garsson firm.
Somervell said the former
Democratic Congressman from
Kentucky also interceded with
him, in the midst of the wartime
manpower shortage, to get addi
tional workers allocated to the Ba
tavia company.
Reybold and Fred G. Sherrill,
retired colonel now a San Marino,
Calif., cotton broker, said May
called them separately and asked
to arrange fo ■ the Batavia firm to
bid on an army contract for wood
en water storage tanks.
Reybold could not recall details
of his conversation with May but
Sherrill said that, in response to
May's request, he issued an order
permitting Batavia to enter its bid
end the firm obtained the con
tract.
Neither Somervell nor Sherrill
could recall that May had asked
help for any other war contractors
except the Garssons. Somervell
did say, however, that he had
oftei conferred with May on army
matters during the war.
The defense succeeded in clock
ing temporarily a prosecution at
tempt to introduce into evidence
May's letter to Eisenhower on the
court martial against Murray
Garsson's son. Capt. Joseph Gars
son.
Sent Officer
Col. Herrold Brooks said he
could not identify the letter as
May's but he knew May had writ
ten one to Eisenhower and sent
Maj. Gen. Alden H. Waitt of the
Chemical Warfare service to Eu
rope to deliver it.
Evidence at a Senate investi
gation last summer showed that
Cap!. Garsson was charged in the
court martial with refusing to
obey a battle - field command.
Erooks testified today that Free
man and Murray Garsson talked
1c him about the court martial
proceeding and that he informed
them it involved “a serious
offense punishable by death.”
The text of the court martial
correspondence as made public by
the Senate War Investigating com
rr.itte last July showed that May
asked that “a proper and fair con
sideration” be given the young
officer "who 1 understand, with
th's minor exception, h a s an ex
cellent record. ’ Eisenhower re
plied that he was sending it along
■‘to the proper authorities who will
make an investigation concerning
the charges.”
Captain Garsson was convicted
and sentenced to dismissal from
the army even before May wrote.
However, after two strong recom
mendations from judge advocates
for clemency, the sentence was
suspended and Garsson subse
quently went on the inactive list.
Students at Union High School
In Salinaa, Calif., now have to
Pass a compulsory driving ourse
in order to graduate.
AMERICAN
FLOOR
SANDING
AND
FINISHING
MACHINES
greggIros.
Market & FRONT
Dial 9655
<Si.nK , CHURCHES throughout the south are observing 3un beam focus week this week. One of he highlights of the Sunset Park
Ti o™.8 the party ?ive“ Tuesday afternoon at the Church. At that time the children brought gifts of food and clothing for worb
i he Sun bean Band, pictured above, is one of the most active organizations of the Church. Its purpose is to promote missions
4ii* Jim th£ 'V, d- Thpre are 75 children in the fmnn re-" -- age from 4 through 8, and they are under the leadership of Mrs. H. L.
-*“ra, Jlrs- K- G- Fountain, Mrs. Carl Taylor, Mrs. James Roderick, Mrs. D. T. Branch and Mrs. A. Q. Parker.
SCHOOL TO GET
FEDERAL AID
Resumption Of Meal-Aid
For One County School
Is Assured
H. M. Roland, superintendent of
schools said yesterday that federal
funds for resumption of federal
aid meals in at least one New
Hanover county school, which ter
minated serving meals March 1
because of a lack of funds, have
been allocated.
Federal lunch program funds to
taling approximately $1,500 will be
ready at the Washington Catlett
school when the 275 students re
turn to their classes Monday morn
ing, it was learned from the offices
of E. R. Blakeslee, principal of the
school.
Washington Catlett, one of the
three county schools to get federal
money toward a lunch program,
and to have such funds curtailed,
serves about 75 per cent of its
students under the program
Blakeslee said the students pay 15
cents and the government pays 10
cents on each meal.
He pointed out that federal al
locations will be retroactive to
March 1. Lake Forest and William
Hooper schools are the other coun
ty institutions to get help. Their
programs were not cancelled.
REALTY TRANSFERS
James Rit*er Burnett to David
Anthony Ritter, part of lot five,
block 149, City.
L. W. Moore to Moore Fonvielle
Realty company, lots 35 and 46
Country club terrace.
S. B. Hoy to E. P. Godwin, lot
16, block 17, North Shores.
Silas E. Sneeden to S. F. Lewis,
lot 10. block “A”, Flemington.
E. L. Rogers to J. T. Brown. Jr.,
five acres on Greenville Sound
road.
David E. Bulluch to Edna J.
Coleman, lot 22, block E, Sea
breeze.
J. H. Graham to S. E. Cooper,
part of lot eight, Southerland, Gor
don road.
J. A. Stevens to S. E. Cooper,
part of lot eight, Southerland, Gor
don road.
R. P. McClammy to Janie L. Mc
Clammy, part of lot six, block 100,
City.
Edward C. Johnson to Edna J.
Coleman, lots 28 and 29, block F,
Seabreeze.
Oscar M. Abernathy to Irene
Money, part of lot three, block six,
Wilmington beach.
C. B. Parmele to W. T. Little,
lot nine, block 61, Carolina Beach.
W. T. Little to C. M. Randolph
lot nine, block 61, Carolina Beach.
Sam H. Blake to Edward M.
Sears. Jr., part of lot 21, block 50,
Carolina Beach.
J O. Hinton to E. N. Hardison
lot seven, block 83, Carolina Beach.
John L. Lane, Jr., to D. L. White,
tract of land at Harbor Island.
D. L. White to John L. Lane, Jr.,
i lots six and seven, block 70, Caro
lina Beach. •
John L. Lane, Jr., to William
Hodges, lots six and seven, block
70, Carolina Beach.
MARRIAGE licenses
Bobie Rae Ricks, 18, of Rocky
Point and Sidney Marion Lane, 25,
of Burgaw.
Marie Willis (nee Andrews), 28,
of Wilmington, and Archie Louis
Maver 22, of Crowley, Louisiana.
J Gertrude Bell '61. and Dr.
James S. Hall, 74, both of Wil
mington.
divorce filed
Eddie E. Sandlin versus Louise
Tatum Sandlin.
SUITS FILED
G A Foote, G. S. Foote, C. C.
Haves and R- C. Owen, doing busi
ness as Foote Brother and com
nanv Norfolk, Va., against C. W.
Davis and company, suing for
$599.21 for payment of fOO oases
nf nrunes claimed ordered by the
defendant and then refused to ac
cept. _
OLDEST”BoCKEY DEAD AT 55
LA CROSSE, Kan. — (U.R) — The
world’s oldest jockey, Stephen Levi
Burlingame died here at the age
f 95. He rode for 60 years. At 80.
Burlingame mounted a horse m a
ECe at Stafford for what proved
iis last ride. The horse fell and
he jockey suffered a fractured
eg.___—
NANCE TONIGHT
At The
OCEAN PLAZA
CAROLINA BEACH
DANCING FROM
9 TO 1 — TO THE MUSIC
OF
LARRY TAYLOR
ADMISSION.7Sc Plus Tax
News Of The Carolinas
PANTHER THRILL
NEWTON May 9—(U.R)—Citizens
with Frank Buck Day Dreams
were thinking today of the re
cent thrills in their real life
panther hunt. Cheeta, a Jive-year
old panther, in town with a carni
val, slipped her chain and took
off for the woods. First reaction
of local citizens was to head for
cover, but Cheeta’s owners as
sured them that Cheeta was a lady
and wouldn’t bite strangers.
HEARING SCHEDULED
HIGH POINT, May 9—(U.R)— A
city court hearing was scheduled
today for Garlin P. Lemons, 38,
of Concord, who was arrested on
charges of trying to criminally as
sault an 11-year-old girl.
POLICE STUDY DEATHS
CHARLOTTE, May 9—(U.R)—Po
lice today studied, carefully the
deaths of a Charleston business
man and a former employee who
committed suicide the following
day for possible clues that would
link the two incidents.

ELECTION UNDER PROTEST
DOBSON, May 9—(TP)—Legality
of Dobson’s municipal election
last Tuesday was under protest
today by a local merchant who
has asked a hearing before the
election board. Mayor Frank
Freeman said last night that D.
T. Sparger had submitted the
protest and had been informed he
could have a hearing anyiirne and,
if necessary, the election would
be held again.
STOCK SHOW
WILLIAMSTON, May 9 —(TP)—
A fat stock show, and the annual
meeting of the Martin county farm
bureau, may draw as many as
2,000 farmers and other visitors
here today.
Former Governor J. M. Brough
ton add-esses the county organi
zation this afternoon. Forty-seven
4-H club boys and girls have
entries in the fat stock show.
CONFERENCE
ASHEVILLE. May 9 —(TP)— A
conference of probation and pa
role officers from 11 southern
states is scheduled here May 15
17, along with a southern states
prison conference. Leading jurists,
probation and prison officials will
attend.
HEADS SPEAKERS LIST
ASHEVILLE May 9. —(.5s)—
Richardson Wright of New York
city, editor of House and Garden
magazine, heads a list of speak
ers for the two-day meeting of
the Garden Club of North Caro
lina here May 14-15.
TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS
RALEIGH, May 9. —(TP)— A to
tal of 4,663 persons were found
guilty of moving violations on the
roads and streets of North Carolina
during April as compared with 3,
167 for April, 1946, Motor Vehicles
Commissioner T. Boddie Ward said
today.
TO DELIVER BANQUET
DURHAM, May 9 —(TP)— Dr.
Allen A. Stockdale of New York,
head of the speakers bureau of
the National Association of Manu
facturers, will deliver the ban
quet address at the May 12th meet
ing of the 189th Rotary district.
PLANS TO ERECT MEMORIAL
MOORESVILLE, May 9 —(/P>—
Plans are underway among citi
zens of South Iredell county to
erect a $75,000 war memorial com
munity house here as a tribute to
veterans of both world wars
SELECTS MEMBERS
CHAPEL HILL, May 9 --(/PI—
The North Carolina Resource-Use
Education commission has select
ed the members of a state com
mittee on resource use education
to represent the state at the forth-^
coming southern states work con
ference at Daytona Beach, Fla.,
June 2-14.
MAYOR OF BURLINGTON
BURLINGTON, May 9 —UP)
W. Boman Sanders, hosier:
manufacturer, was named mayo
of Burlington by the city counci
last night. At the same time the
council voted to accept the resig
nation of City Manager Roy L
Williamson, who has served two
years in his present capacity.
BOARD LOSES THREE
ROANOKE RAPIDS, May 9—(.'?)
—The Halifax county Board of
Education was shy three of its
members today as the result of a
dispute over the election of a
county school superintendent.
SUFFERS $30,000 FIRE LOSS
NEWTON, May 9 —(/P)— The
Red Fox Hosiery plant here suffer
ed a loss estimated at $30,000 la-st
night when the building, equip
ment and stock on hand were vir
tually destroyed by fire. Fire
Chief Perry Reitzel said today
the origin of the blaze was as yet
undetermined.
KILLED IN AUTO ACCIDENT
MOUNT AIRY, May 9—</P)-- Paul
Le n Hall. 22, son or Mr. and Mrs.
E. Kern Hall, who reside 10 miles
south of here, was instant'y killed
I early today in an automobile acci
dent near Marlboro, Md., hig par
ents were advised tonight
EGYPTIAN STAFF ARRIVES
FORT BRAGG, May 9—WP)—A
12-man Royal Egyptian Military
and Air mission arrived here by
plane this morning to inspect Fort
*ragg. The mission, headed by
Lieut. Gen. Ibrahim Atalla. chief
of staff of the Egyptian Army, and
Brig. Gen Mahmoud Sobhi, was
greeted by Maj. Gen. S. Leroy
Irwin, commanding general of
Fort Bragg. An honor guard and
band from the 82nd airborne di
vision were at nearby Pope Field
when the visitors arrived.
FUR AUCTION
RALEIGH, May 9. — (JP) — A
match of 400 confiscated furs was
auctioned off today at the office
here of the division of game and
fisheries.
VEHICLES TRAFFIC
RALEIGH, May 9. —{£>)— On an
average day during April, there
were 50,169 vehicles to pass the
state highway commission count
ing machines, James S. Burch,
state highway engineer of statistics
and planning, announced today.
ELECTED PRESIDENT
CONCORD, May 9 — OT— The
Rev. J. D. Sheppard of Shelby has
been elevated to the presidency of
the southern conference of the
North Carolina Lutheran Synod.
INJURED WHEN . CAR LEAVES
ROAD
ROXBORO, May 9—OR}—William
J. Wood. 26, of Durham, seriously
injured when his car left the road
near Somerset Mill late last night,
will be placed under $500 bond on
charges of possession, transporting
and careless and reckless driving
as soon as he is released from a
Durham hospital. Sheriff C. C.
Holeman said today.
SWORN IN AS MEMBER
RALEIGH, May 9. — «P)— R. A.
Whitaker of Kinston, today was
sworn in as a member of the board
of public welfare, succeeding the
unexpired term of John A. Oates.
Fayetteville Attorney who resign
ed. Associate Justice William A.
Devin of the State supreme court
administered the oath.
City Briefs
Mrs. George Ay ash will return
here Sunday after attending the
funeral of her brother, F. C. How
ell, who died Tuesday morning and
was buried Wednesday afternoon
in Charlotte.
A Red Cross first aid class is
scheduled to start on Wednesday,
May 14, at 411 South Front street
the Red Cross House, according
to C. H. McAllister, chairman of
safety services. Class hours are
4 to 6 p. m. Boy Scouts and Girl
Scouts are eyiecially invited to
this class which will be taught by
' Corporal James Green of the
R.O.T.C.
Robert Scott, director of safety
and insurance; Ben H. Brown, as
sistant to vice-president — traffic;
and Jim S. Webb, Jr., public re
lations official at .the Atlantic
Coast Line railroad will meet with
their executives of Eastern Rail
roads at a public relations con
ference of the Association of Amer
ican Railroads in Washington, D.
C., on May 14, and 15. The confer
ence will be held under the direc
tion of the public relations section
of the association.
Cape Fear Council No. 374 of
the United Commercial Travelers
of America, will meet Saturday
night, May 10, at 8 o’clock in the
Odd Fellows Hall.
J. Douglas Taylor, Clerk of
Federal court, will be out of the
city until Monday.
The local chapters of Boy Scouts,
accompanied by the New Hanover
High school band, preceded the
oresentation of the Scout circus
yesterday afternoon with a parade.
The Scout circus was sponsored
by the Junior Chamber of Com
merce and was held at the Ameri
can Legion stadium last night.
Residents of Wilmington aie ash
ed to place old clothing, bedding,
and shoes on their front porches
this afternoon for the Boy Scouts
to pick up. The goods are to be
used for overseas relief. W. B.
Spivey, chairman of the drive, said
that 20 trucks, which have been
offered by local firms, will start
on their rounds at 1 p. m .today.
Persons wislring to give any used
clothing to the drive are asked to
place it on the porch by that time.
Leon Thomas, Cub master of
Pack 3033, was presented a flag
yesterday in behalf of the pack,
by C. C. Johnson, E. S. Knott, W.
A. Marine, E. F. Loftin, Sr., and
A. L. Snow The cub pack is spon
sored b ythe Loyal Orde.- ..' Moose,
Lodge 343
COSTS MORE TO DIE
CHICAGO, — OJ.R) — The Na
tional Selected Morticians here
have announced that the nation’s
average funerl bill for 1940 was
$375, or 12.6 per cent more than the
1945 average of $333. A «urv*y of
98,350 funerals wa amade on a na
tionwide basis.
Obituaries
J. A. SCOGGINS
LUMBERTON, May 9—Funeral
services for J. A. Scoggins, 62,
North Lumberton textile worker
who died Wednesday afternoon at
Baptist hospital in Winston-Salem
were held yesterday from North
Lumberton Baptist church at 3:30
p. m. Mr. Scoggins had been ill
over a long period of time.
The Rev. George H. Wallace of
ficiated. Interment followed in
the Meadowbrook cemetery.
Surviving are his widow and sev
eral children.
B. M. JONES, SR.
B. M. Jones, Sr., 314 S. Fifth
avenue, died early this morning in
the Atlantic Coast Line railroad
hospital, Rocky Mount, following
an illness of several months.
A native of Columbus county,
Mr. Jones moved to this city in
his youth. He began his ACL
career in the office of William
Flannigan, car accountant.
Mr. Jones was chief clerk in
the freight claim prevention de
partment at the time of death.
He is survived by his widow,
Mrs. Frances D. Jones, five sons,
Benjamin M., Jr., Edward H.,
Joseph B., Thomas H., and Charles
D. Jones, a brother, W. F. Jones,
of Whiteville, and a sister, Mrs.
R. H. Jarman, of Wilmington.
The body will remain at An
drews Mortuary until time of the
funeral.
Honorary pallbearers: A. L.
Batts, D. H. Crenshaw, M. W. Gore.
Waddell Watters, C. C. Loper, A. L.
Eakins, T. P. Chapman, J. J. Al
len, William Sheehan, H. L. Tay
lor, L. C. Robertson, T. E\ Apple
white. W. R. Page and E. L. Lee.
Active palbearers are: P. J.
Baschon, Ralph V. Huband, John
Powell, Sr., William Bremer, Wil
liam Powell and F. M. McCoy.
GEORGE I). GRAINGER
TABOR CITY. May 9 — Mr.
George D. Grainger, 57, prominent
farmer of Loris S. C., died in the
Mullins hospital this morning aft
er a short illness.
He is survived by his wife anc
three daughters, Mrs. Sam Floyd
and Mrs. Preston Mincey of Loris
and Mrs. Johnnie Williams of Dil
lon; five sons, Woodrow of Aynor
Worley Wade of Fair Bluff, Maxie
Lee Floyd and Walker Jennings of
Loris.
HENRY THOMAS LEWIS
Funeral services for Henry
Thomas Lewis, 54, who died yes
terday morning at 8 o’clock, at
the Bullock hospital after a long
illness, will be held at the Wcod
burn Presbyterian church at 4
p.m. today. Rev. J. D. Withrow
will officiate.
Mr. Lewis who owned and ope
rated the Navassa Grocery Co. for
33 years, was an elder in the Wood
burn Presbyterian Church, a char
ter member and immediate past
treasurer of the Leland Lions Club.
Surviving are his wife Mrs. Mar
garet Reynolds Lewis, three sons
Paul of Wilmington, James Edwaru
and Thurston of Leland; eight
daughters Mrs. Daughtry Heath ol
Marysville California, Mrs. Alberta
Robbins of Leland, Mrs. Mildred L
Silma, Misses Wilmur, Virginia.
Barbara Jean, Nancy Fay and La
nell Lewis all of Wilmington; three
brothers G. C. and S. A. Lewis of
Wilmington and W. H. Lewis of
Bolton, N. C.; three sisters Mrs. T.
C. Pate of Wannanish, Mrs. George
Carroll of Leland and Mrs. E. M.
Farabow of Wilmington, and two
grandchildren.
Pallbearers will be Honorary.
Dr. W. C. Mebane, Dr. R. T. Sin
clair, R. V. Williams, W. L. Paden,
Sr., D. J. Ellers, McD. Jones, G.
R. Ennis, E. A. Rusher and W.
Eugene Edwards; Active: James
T. Paden, Mac Floyd Jones, W. G.
Adams, Sr., U. L. Rourk, Bruce
Russ and Joseph Ganey.
MBS. EXIE BOND
Funeral services for Mrs. Exie
Bond, Burgaw, who died at her
residence after a short illness, will
be held Sunday at 3 p.m. at the
graveside of the family cemetery
in Burgaw.
Surviving are her husband,
James Evander Bond, Burgaw:
two daughters, Louise and Bertha
Mae, of Burgaw: two sons, Allen
and Martin Lee Bond of Burgaw;
three brothers. Hubert Lanier. J.
E. Lanier of Wilmington and Den
nis Lanier, of Raleigh; three sis
ters, Mrs. Pearl King of Jackson
ville; Mrs. Goldie Wells of Bur
gaw; and Mrs. Yeady Wagstaff of
Burgaw.
RED MEN PICK
MEET DELEGATES
The Wilmington Red Men pick
ed the following delegates, to the
Great Council meeting of North
Carolina, to be held in Asheville,
May 18-20. F. K. J. Futchs, Maryin
Von Oesen, J. J. Mohn, D. E. Mur
ray, Addison Hewlett, Jr., Harold
Sternberger, J. R. Melton, K. S.
Mallard, Isaac Hardison, Solomon
B. Sternberger, W. E. Yopp and
W. J. Mallard.
Addison Hewlett, Jr., spoke to
the Red Men at their meeting
Thursday night. The next meeting
is slated for May 15.
POLICE TO GET
FILING SYSTEM
City Manager J. R. Benson said
yesterday that a qualified man has
been chosen to set up a detailed
criminal record filing system for
the Wilmington Police department.
Benson declined to disclose the
name of the system or plans for
its operation. “The man will be
here soon to start work,” he said.
Chief of Police Hubert Hayes de
clared he is anxious to have such
a system installed as soon as pos
sible.
“The plan we will use is ap
proved by the FBI and by other
law enforcement groups in the larg
est cities in the United States,”
Benson stated.
The city manager said that he
hopes to work out a system
^hereby the city police can co
operate with Sheriff Porter Davis
and the State Highway Patrol. “We
want a file that will include every
arrest in New Hanover County,”
Benson said, s
According to accurate measur
ing devices, the length of the
terrestrial day is lengthening one
thousandth of a second every cen
tury because of the gradual slow
ing of the earth’s axial rotatoin.
LOCAL UNDERWRITERS
HOBD BANQUET MEET
The Wilmington Life Under
writers Association, meeting at the
Crystal restaurant yesterday aft
ernoon, heard an address by Geor
ge Ross, who recently came here
as assistant district manager of
the Metropolitan Insurance com
pany.
Speaking on the subject "Rend
ering Service Through Insurance."
Ross er, hasized the responsibili
ty of the agents in their respec
tive fields.
He was introduced by D. H.
Howes, vice-president of the local
association.
During the luncheon meeting the
underwriters discussed plans for
participation in the program of
the State Association’s annual
meeting next month in Winston
Salem.
j Approximately 35 life insurance
1 men attended the meeting.
SATURDAY! 150 WOMEN'S AND
MISSES CRISP, NEW SUMMER
DRESSES
VALUES TU $24.98!
nnu/N G0PRICES
U V If 11 AT WAHL S
YOU WANT SEVERAL
0
FOR YOURSELF! FOR
MOTHER S DAY GIFTS
CHOOSE:
• RAYON SHEERS • RAYON SPUNS
• RAYON RENRERGS • RUTCHER WEAVE LINENS
• RROADCLOTHS AND COTTONS
CHOOSE:
CHARGE IT
AT
WAHL'S!
• FLOWER PRINTS • POLKA DOTS
• MULTI-COLOR PRINTS • CHECKS
• SOLID TONES
CHOOSE:
• DRESSY STYLES • BUTTON FRONT
• I AND 2-PC. CLASSICS • GORED OR
PLEATED SKIRTS • SOFTLY DRAPED
RODICES!
ON SALE ON BARGAIN BALCONY
Saturday Sales Stimulators!
blue swan
JERSEY PANTIES
The perfect summer panty. Na
tionally advertised. White or
pink _
The Famous
PLAYTEX LIVING GIHDLE
\s advertised in LIFE maga
zine. Made of smooth liquid la
tex. A nature-skin that molds
vou in without bones or metal
->r seams or stitches.
Candy Stripes
PLAY DRESSES
j{ fine mercerized washable'cotton. Fast color.
Red or blue stripes. Off-shoulder Bolero effect
top, ruffled neckline, crochet-trim with narrow
black ribbon insertion. Wide flared ruffled skirt
with matching trim.
$12"
BLUE SWAN
JERSEY SLIPS
Fine quality Jersej. Nationally
advertised. Pink or white.
They're New!
BROOMSTICK SKIRTS
Over 4 yards of whirling swirling
fashion' Don’t iron! Don’t fold! Just
wrap around the bamboo broom
stick. Pleats stay in as if pressed,
gay, floral prints on pink, yellow,
blue or white grounds.
Butcher Linen
SLACKS
You’ll want several pair for summer wear.
Styled like men’s slacks with side slash pocket.
Full cut. pleats at waist. Braided leather belts
in black and white, or brown and white. Cof
fee! White! Aoua!
214 N.
FRONT ST.
p
DIAL 9567
OR 2-1823

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