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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, May 13, 1947, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-05-13/ed-1/seq-8/

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BOY SCOUTS PLAN
| TO BUY CAMP SITE
1C a p e Fear Council
I Negotiating For Tract
I Near Fort Bragg
The Cape Fear council, Boy
Scouts of America, was yesterday
negotiating for a 15,000-acre tract
of land to be used as a camp site
lor the nine-county area under the
council’s jurisdiction.
The tract is situated near Fort
Bragg and is currently being used
by the camp as a recreation site
lor soldiers there.
Included in the 15,000 acres are
two lakes and several small plots
oi young trees.
Plans of the council, if the
site is purchased, is to construct
two camps, one for white and the
other for Negro scouts.
Louis Woodbury, Jr., president
of the council, said today that
the plot is owned by a retired
Army officer and is under lease
to The United States Army for use
by Fort Bragg.
He said the council would have
to negotiate with the Army to
break their lease if the sale is
culminated.
The lakes are tuuy developed
for swimming and have been used
for that purpose by Bragg person
nel.
There are no buildings on the
site, he said, remarking the coun
cil would have to furnish tem
porary quarters for the 1947 sea
son if the deal is made.
Some 3,000 scouts and cubs are
enrolled with the council.
The council embraces nine coun
ties: New Hanover. Brunswick,
Pender, Columbus. Bladen, Robe
son, Scotland, Hoke and Cumber
land.
First letter carried by air
crossed the English Channel in
1785 bv balloon.
IT’S USEFUL!
2-Burner
OIL STOVE
Just the thing for summer
camping or to use in summer
cottages. Cooking top is 11
x 22-inches.
You'll Find It Here!
ANCHOR
HARDWARE COMPANY
Corner Front and Dock
Dial 5043
YOUNG KUDY GIESCHEN SAYS “AH” FOB THE DOCTOR—As. Dr. Paul L. Stuck examines
him in preparation for his entrance to school next year. The pre-school clinic held ye*terday at the Chest
nut Street school, is one of many being sponsored b y the County Council of PTA. (PHOTO BY BEN
MAYNARD.)______
Ghost Walking Presents
Pro blem In UP Offices
Editors note: Herewith is
another of the new United
Press “memo” features; this
one from Shanghai where the
“Ghost Walks” in the UP
bureau even when it isn't
payday.
By UNITED PRESS
Memo From Shanghai
To the auditors in explanation
of a special item of $12,000
Chinese for firecrackers on the
April account of the Shanghai
United Press bureau.
Charge it off to ‘labor rela
tions.”
The firecrackers were necessary
because the United Press officers
at No. 9 Chungcheng Liu were
haunted by ghosts. In China, you
see, ghosts can present a serious
complication in an already unbe
lievably complex labor situation.
I first heard of the ghosts two
or three months ago, a murmur
of uneasiness from the back room
occupied by radio operators,
mimeopragh operators, and mes
sengers. Ghangsen (Longevity)
Yu, the night office boy, finally
approached me.
VENETIAN BLINDS
AT T. SIZE BLINDS MADE AND
BEFINTSHED
STOCKLAND VENETIAN
BLIND WOBKS
I Phone 0404. Castle Harne Road
It seems in the early hours one
morning, as he dozed over the
books of flimsey he was making,
he was startled to see the door
leading into a darkened hallway
slowly open. As he watched, hyp
notized, the frail and snow white
hand and arm of a women reach
ed through the partly-opened door
and groped for the light switch.
Changsen, contrary to his nor
mal office activity, rushed to the
door and slammed it. The arm was
not caught nor was it withdrawn.
The arm “just disappeared,”
Changsen said. Obviously a ghost.
Others of the staff, with unaccus
tomed dilligence, set about to
learn the history of the haunt.
They turned up the loliowing
facts: the present United Press
offices were occupied during the
way by one Kimkura, a Japa
nese. On the floor below lived a
beautiful Chinese servant girl. One
morning her body was found
dangling from a rope in the bath
room. She had chosen death to dis
honor
The Chinese believe the soul of
one who died because of anothers’
wrong is permitted by the gods
of hell, who pass judgment on all
souls, to float about the earth,
seeking a way to get even. Some,
however, being mischievous haunt
innocent people.
The night radio operator — a
six footer named Tehling Chung
next came forward and insisted
he, too, had seen the khost. He
was climbing The eighth flight of
stairs to the office one moonless
night when he saw standing in
the hallway a woman in a blue
gown, apparently waiting for the
elevator.
Chung gallantly explained no
lift was operating at the late
hour, but before he had finished
his sentence the woman had “dis
appeared.” Chung ran into the of
fice and slammed the door. In
cidentally, he mispunched the
teletype so atrociously that night
the first take of the London
broadcast made no sense. And he
began to pay the night watchman
$1,000 Chinese for a special escoort
service each night — up and down
the stairs.
The operators, clerjts and mes
sengers generally believe now,
however, that the $12,000 Chinese
firecracker bombardment on
on Tsingming festival last April—
the day on which ghosts are most
active — had effectively driven
off the haunt.
Chung • alone remains dubious.
He seems to believe the office
should buy expensive dishes from
a nearby "luxury” restaurant in
order to offer sacrifices to the
spirits. It is better to appease evil
than to freighten it away by
force, he says.
Confronted with an unsympa
thetic attitude on my part he sigh
ed. "it is deplorable foreign firms
like United Press never can un
derstand the khost psychology.”
derstand the khost psychology.”
Chinese.
L. Z. Yuan.
Shanghai Bureau Manager.
May 12, 1947
GETTING READY TO GO TO SCHOOL NEXT FALL——Kive-year-old Janice Kaye Dawson, 2026
Klein road, lets Dr. Guy E. Pigford, dentist, examine her teeth at the Chestnut Street school pre
school clinic held Monday afternoon. Children entering school next tall have been examined all over
the county. (PHOTO BY BEN MAYNARD.)
UN Agrees: Doodling
International Habit
NEW YORK, May 12. —(U.R)—The
United Nations agree unanimously
on one thing — Doodling is an
international pastime.
Inspired by speeches and
tedious translations, the top dip
lomats from Russia to Latin
America cover scratch pads and
envelopes with pictures, geometric
designs and seemingly senseless
scribbling.
Psychologists, playing it cagey,
won’t come right out and say wrhat
these doodles mean, but they do
arrive at some “tentative and pre
liminary’’ indications from the
delegates' art work.
Take the bold, geometric figures
sketched by the Soviet Union's
Andrei Gromyko, who has the dis
tinction of being the only ambidex
trous doodler at this U. N. session.
Gromyko draws neavy line geo
metric designs. Some look like
Mosaics — small rectangular pat
terns sliced up into innumerable
parts.
Others look like crude architec
tural plans or free hand versions
of something about to be submit
ted to the U. S. Patent Office.
This could possibly mean—may
be — say the conscientious psy
chologists at the New York uni
versity testing and advisement
center, quite a number of things.
1. Heavy closed patterns ir.di -
cate a rigid, inflexible nature, .dis
ciplined and almost devoid of
spontaneity.

2. Retracing the same lines
points out a nature meticulous and
conscientuous almost to a fault.
3. Three doodles on one page,
each an entirely separate design,
shows that Gromyko believes in
doing one thing at a time—
thoroughly.
4. Extremely bold and heavy
lines indicate intense nervous
strain and preoccupation with his
own problems.
5. The steady, regular quality of
the lines in these doodles shows
Gromyko has a high degree of in
tellectual integration — in short
he’s plenty capable of solving his
own problems, though they seem
difficult to him.
C. In plain ordinary language,
the guy seems to be introvert.
The Yugoslav delegation may
vote like its Soviet neighbors, but
it doesn’t doodle the same way.
The best artist from Yugoslavia
apparently is an extrovert. What’s
more he’s witty, clever and proba
bly quite gay at heart. For he
draws intriguing caricatures of
his fellow delegates — a saa-eyed
sketch of Faris HI Khoury of Syria
and a digr one of Britain’s
Alexander n. In his spare
time he w. p floppy - haired
one-eyed si of Hitler.
The most mted doodler of
this U. N. Session comes from
Latin America. Actually he s more
of an artist than a doodler and a
home-sick artist at that. One in
tricate little picture shows a
shaded, arched building facade
and a man and woman strolling
into the distance; another a coun
try scene with mountains and
clouds framing a farm-house. If
he’s not homesick, apparently he
is a frustrated architect.
The most creative delegate—as
far as doodles show — is from
China. His curved, oval figures, as
graceful in line as an old Chinese
vase, show imagination, extreme
sensitivity and great creative abil
ity.
The Lebanese delegation keeps
its doodling right on the subject.
Across a battered envelope, filled
with a stray cigaret butt or two
are the carefully traced letters U.
N., repeated over and over.
The psychologists don’t always
agree on the value of studying
doodles, or what these idle little
sketches mean. But they are sure
of one thing. Doodling occurs
when an individual is preoccupied
with a problem requiring close
attention and concentration.
That much is hopeful, at any
rate.
In 14S7 golf was so much
played in Scotland that it took the
place of archery and other an -
cient games.
Match
G U R ft Jewelers
Wilmington’* Fine Jeweler
264 N. Front St. Dial 2-1811
TORNADOES STING
SOUTHWEST TOWNS
Eighteen People Receive
Jnjuries As Tremors
Hit 6 To 9 Areas
LENORAH, Tex., May 12_
Tornadoes have stung the"ww
west m at i.,„t
bly nine, places during tho i?.
24 hours, late reports tods' ■
cated. • R<“
The storms injured 18 D(>r,„
and inflicted high property da"S
age. Tornado-born ra;ns
creek and rivers t0 flood “ 'eC
Twisters struck North Cc*
Lenorah, the Dalhart area r!
and Ackerly, all in Tex’,*?*
El Dorado, Okla.. last nigh! R.“:
dents in South Hale county
the storm coming and dodger
storm cellars. ‘ c
Today, a high wind struck V
Alester and Haywood, Ok's" Vj
ficials »aid it was not a tornaH„
but that clouds accompan. rg
wind resembled one. None®..!
injured, and property damjoe tc
day was not high,
Lenorah, hardest hit t«r fti
reported 15 persons injured, F
Dorado had three.
INDUSTRIAL BOOM
SEEN FOR SOUTH
An industrial boom, 0f extended
proportions for the south, including
Wilmington, was predicted todav
by H. E. Boyd, traffic managr
of this city’s Port-Traffic associa
tion.
The prediction came after the
United States Supreme court's d*
cision upholding the Interstate
Commerce Commission's ruling in
lowering rail rates 10 percent in
the north and hiking them for the
south. Mr. Boyd declared it wil’
mean the ‘’savings of hundreds
of thousands of dollars for Wil
mington and the rest of the south
land.”
Dial 2-3311 For Newspaper Service
Absolute
SAFETY
—For Your—
SAVINGS
I
START AN
ACCOUNT TODAY
—WITH—
THE INSURED
PEOPLES
Building & Loan Ass n.
WM. M. HILL, 8ECY.-TKEA9.
112 PRINCESS ST.
IN A KAISER OR A FRAZER
YOU GET THE 100% POSTWAR RIDE
If you want to know what “f/ie 100% postwar ride” is like, there’s
only one way to find out. Come and get into a Kaiser or a Frazer
*nd—take a ride! You really ought to do it before you pay money
for a prewar car that will soon be obsolete. Compare the ride!
Try being a passenger! You will notice the difference before you
have gone two blocks! And you’ll agree there never was a ride like
this before. Then take the wheel! No matter how many cars or
miles you’ve driven, you’ll get a kick out of the relaxed ease with
which you control and guide either of these most modern of motor
cars. You’ll want one!
I^ISER
You and all five of your passengers relax in roomy comfort
in the Kaiser or the Frazer. A “front-seat” ride in both seats
is result of advanced chassis and body design that lets you
all ride between the axles! Low center of gravity also helps.
CHECK THIS LIST OF POSTWAR FEATURES
BEFORE YOU BUY ANY NEW CAR
MEDAL-WINNING STYLING: Fashion Acad
emy gold medal award (to the Frazer
Manhattan) as “best dressed car of 1947”
— for body lines that establish a new trend
in motor car design, and its fashionable
new exterior and interior color schemes.
“Beauty with a purpose!”
LUXURIOUS ROOMINESS: Wheelbase -
123\ Inches; overall length —203 inches —
bis, roomy cars, with all their width
inside! Both front and rear seats, scientif
ically designed for restful comfort, are
i 62 Inches —more than five feet—wide!
More headroom; more legroom. And a
super-size luggage compartment.
TOMORROW’S ENGINEERING: The extraor
dinary ride is the result of postwar
chassis engineering — improved distribu
tion of mass and load —back seat well
forw’ard of rear wheels. Remarkable per
formance and gas mileage — from econom
ical, 100 hp. L-head, six-cylinder engine.
EXTRA SAFETY FACTORS: “Open-car”
visibility in all directions. Smooth,
“feather-touch” hydraulic brakes. Low
center of gravity —minimum sidesway on
curves. Wide rims —more rubber on road.
Stabilizer bars both front and rear. You
feel safer —you are safer! “Push-button”
door openers mean children’s safety!
SEE YOUR FRIENDLY KAISER AND FRAZER DEALER • TIME PAYMENTS IF DESIRED
HOWELL MOTOR CO., 7 N. Third Street, Wilmington, N. C.
t. * B. MOTORS. INC.
•11 Snnth MadUon St.,
Whltevllle, N. C.
tVhP MOTOR CO..
.fackRonvIlle, N. C.
MOREHEAD MOTORS
Arendall Street.
Morehead City, N. C.
JESSUP BROS. MOTOR CO.
Wallace, N. C.
LEE MOTOR SALES, INC. MASSEY MOTOR CO.
320 South Front Street, ISO West Kin* Street,
New Bern, N. C. Kinston, N. C.
EDWARDS * MEWBORN, INC.
Snow Hill, N. O.
MODLIN MOTOR SALKS,
128 North John Street,
Goldsboro, N. C.
WILSON MOTOR CO.
Roaeboro, N. C.
KHL1Y HOWWLL MOTOR SAL»
SI* Lisbon Street,
Clinton, S. C. ^
B. & E. M010K _ *
Mount Ollre^^^^^

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