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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, May 15, 1947, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-05-15/ed-1/seq-8/

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CHAPTER FOURTEEN
* ‘‘Bill, tell me more about Ruf
us."
Bill was standing before the
bureau, loosening his tie.
“ “Why Rufus, just now?” .
* “Because Page is letting him
-give her a rush." Diane consider
ed she could say that much of the
'truth.
At that Bill swung around.
“Page.”
Diane saw him frown. “What’s
wrong with that?"
Bill dropped his tie on.the dress
er top, jerked at the buttons of
his shirt. “He’s not Page’s sort—”
Diane sat straight. “You mean
he isn’t good enough for Page?”
“Not that exactly. He's a fine
fellow’, all right, but his back
ground, his way of living, of think
ing, is entirely different from
Page's. Funny, I never thought
Rufus had time for girls. He never
-used to. Though Page is the kind
who would attract him.
“Why,” asked Diane, a little
sharply. . .
“Oh, she isn’t always thinking
"about * herself when she’s w’ith a
fellow. But I’d hate to see her get
in too deep with Rufus.
“Why?” asked Diane again.
Bill thrust a rumpled head up
through his pajama coat, a little
impatiently.
“Why are you so serious about
ell this? I mean that Rufus isn t
the sort to tie up to anyone or
Anything for long."
Diane iav back against her pil
low, a faint dissatisfaction on her
face. “I thought you considered
Rufus one of your friends.”
“I do. But because of that I can
pretty well predict what will hap
pen! You'll see he won't stay in
this town. He’ll be throwing over
this job to go where there's a new
cause he thinks needs his darned
editorials. There isn’t a girl living
Who could hold him back.
Diane's lips broke into a smile.
Bill's irritation was for the edi
torials Rufus was writing about
the Staples trial, not that he
thought Page too perfect! She
•aid, happily: ‘‘Come over and
kiss me good night.”
He kissed ber, turned out the
lights, got into his bed. She
reached from hers to draw the
sheet up over his shoulder, patted
his shoulder, as if he were a child.
The next day her thoughts went
often to Rufus and Page. Bill s
friend and hers. When the trial
was over they'd do things togeth
er the four of them. Bill must
stand with Rufus against the snob
bishness of Page s family.
Rufus joined them at tne club
•t the hour Ross had appointed
for the next rehearsal, looking
rumpled and dusty and incongru
ous in their midst, but completely
at ease. "He may despise » crowd
like this, but he knows how to act
in it,” Diane thought, satisfaction
mingling with some wonder.
Vicky said: “Listen to this.
Rufus, Danny’s going to throw a
party somewhere. To show tha
pictures. A preview. We’ll dance,
won’t we, Danny? You’ll have
•ome music?” To Rufus again, in
a voice !ike honey: “You dance,
don’t you?”
Diane expected him to say he
didn’t. He said: “Mad about it.”
They went to the terrace to go
through their scenes. They were
not quite so eager today: the nov
elty of the idea was wearing off
a little. Wilma announced that
they’d have to shoot at the next
rehearsal because she had been
invited to a nouseparty which she
didn’t want to miss. “Well, step
into it, then,” ordered Ross
Diane and Rufus sat again un
der the tree, this time sauntering
NOW IN SEASON
FRIED
SOFT SHELL
CRABS
With Tartar Sauce
STACYS
Carolina Beach Road
aver to it together. A faint breeze,
stirring the canopy of leaves
above them, the hum of a mower
on some far green, the swish of
water from a spray, all added to
a pleasant sense of relaxation.
Rufus half lay on the ground, his
head propped on an elbow, his
gaze on the fairways rolling off
to the horizon. ,
“You could enjoy all this,” ne
said, reflectively, “if you'd earned
it!" He laughed, half apologetical
ly. “That’s a notion of mine, you
see. To have to work for the privi
leges you get. Leisure, particu
larly.”
“Did you worx your way
through college?” Though Page
had implied that.
“Yep. Pushed a vacuum cleaner
and aired dogs, first-year. Stayed
evenings with kids when their
parents stepped out, typed, second
year. Then I got a job as part
time secretary to an old fellow
who was writing a book on butter
flies. Tutored some.”
She wished he would tell her
more. Of when he was a little
boy. Perhaps then he'd had to
make his own way. She asked im
pulsively: “Didn't you have any
family?”
When he hesitated she regretted
letting her curiosity carry her that
far. She did not think he would
answer her. But he did. after a
moment, with a brief laugh that
deprecated his words. “Yes, I had
a family. I still have. A sister
who s living in a castle, I suppose
you'd call it. somewhere outside of
Milan. The Contessa di Cacchioni,
to give her all she paid for. An
other sister in Boston, holding up
the traditions of her husband’s
Back Bay ancestors. A brother
who's a broker in New i ork—
Diane gave a little exclamation
of delight. Such a family must
surely satisfy Page’s parents! But
Rufus finished: “I don’t know why
I’m telling you of them. I never
speak of them. They don't ap
prove of me or I of them.’
He saw on her face the ques
tion she held back. He laughed
again. “Therd’s a skeleton, though
it rattles only for me. The others
think Uncle Steve's a fine guy.
Ever heard of Stephen Fearon.
1 the industrialist? Sixty or so, now.
and in. the pink of health. Quite a
fellow m philanthropic works,
dotes on writing checks into the
grand for community chests Ho
adopted us. after my father and
mother were killed in an automo
bile smashup. My brother and my
sisters lapped it all up. but I
couldn’t take it. 1 revolteo—”
Diane's eyes were wide with in
terest. “You mean even before
college? You were very young to
»»
“Maybe that was why. At four
teen you don’t rationalize your
prejudices away. You see some
thing happened when I -was
around fourteen.’’ He paused
frowning, went on: “We were liv
ing on a country place my uncle
had taken outside of Atlanta. The
year before he'd moved the mills
from Massachusetts down to Geor
gia because he could get cheaper
labor there. I was coming home
after dark from somewhere,
sneaking round through the gar
den to go in by a back door, and
I saw a woman standing, outside
a window, one of the windows in
the library, close to it, almost hid
den by the thick bushes. I
wouldn’t have seen her except
that, just as I came along, darn
careful to make no noise myself,
she gave a sort of a sob and I
heard it. She had a revolver in
her hand and she kept putting it
up and letting it down. I was
scared out of my wits. I could see
my uncle sitting inside, readinz.
I wanted to yell to him and I
couldn’t. I simply stood there, par
alyzed. and watched her hand and
the gun go up and down, up and
down. I could see her face in the
light from the window, terribly
thin and white and hard, and then
suddenly it seemed to break up
and go soft and frightened and
j she stopped lifting the gun. I
I moved just then and my foot
snapped a twig and she screamed
and my uncle heard her. He
jumped up and pressed a button
' that let hell loose. Bells and the
dogs barking and the servants
Quality
refreshment
mmr wwn mwioiitt w im coca-cola cowaht it
WILMINGTON COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
MAN PAYS DOLLAR
FOR HIS CHICKEN
Strayed Fowl Recovered
And Returned To Owner
By Negro Boy
JACKSONVILLE, May 14.—It
may have cost Bill Bodenhamer a
dollar to get his chicken back, but
the neighbor of A1 Taylor seems to
be satisfied about the entire trans
action.
The story goes something like
this. One of Bodenhamer’s chick
ens strayed from the chicken yard
and perched himself or herself
under the house of Taylor, causing
no end of fuss and confusion to the
Taylor household. The fuss con
tinued for about three weeks and
the sleepy eyed Taylor was be
ginning to become haggard and
his nerves were strained because
of the relentless cackling of the
strayed fowl.
Taylor tried hard to be a good
neighbor and pretended not to be
bothered, but recently his patience
reached the breaking point and he
issued an ultimatum to Bodem
hamer to come and get his chicken
or the Taylor household would
have chicken in their pot.
The chicken owner came over
and after an extensive survey of
the situation, Bill was at a com
plete loss to determine a way to
retrieve his chicken from under the
house. Apparently the chicken
never came out, unless it was early
in the morning.
Bill, being a large man, was
unable to crawl under the house
to get his chicken so he offered a
couple of small boys a dollar o
retrieve his fo\yl.
The youngsters peered under the
house, saw it was pitch dark and
quickly came to the conclusion
that they did, not want to accept
the offer.
Finally Bodenhamer talked one
little Negro boy into crawling un
der the house to recover the chick
en. After a struggle an with a
couple of bumps on his noggin,
the Negro boy emerged with the
fluttering cause of many sleepless
nights for A1 Taylor under his arm.
Bodenhamer seized the chicken,
paid the boy a buck and went
home. The chicken was in the best
of health and very plump and now
the owner wonders where the
chicken got food and water.
Maybe A1 was feeding her all
the time, priming her or him for
the pot. But Taylor is happy, the
chicken is happy to be home, tjie
Negro boy is richer by one dollar
and Bohenhamer is satisfied to
get his chicken back, even if it
did cost him a dollar.
DIVORCES FILED
Margaret Williams Howard
against Willie Howard.
Roosevelt V. Johnson against
! Ernestine Malone Johnson.
running out. They caught her. She
was put under arrest, tried and
sent to prison for ten years. My
uncle could have let her off—
‘But you are for justice! You
wrote that about the Staples
case.”
Rufus pushed his fingers slowly
through his hair. “Yes, I'm for
justice. But I'd seen her right to a
finish the crazy impulse that’d
taken her to the house. She wasn't
any menace to society. She had
some justice coming to her,, too.
It came out in the trial that her
husband had sold to my uncle the
patent rights of some gadget. He'd
worked for my uncle up in Mas
sachusetts. foreman or something.
In the deal he’d signed some sort
ol p contract with my uncle. Then
old foxy Stephen moved to the
south, left all his labor high and
dry behind him, including this
chap. By some stunt of reorgani
zation, their contract w'as made
void. The fellow went nuts. I ask
ed my uncle to let the woman off.
I guess it was then my revolt
started. 1 can remember now how
his face broke out in sweat at the
suggestion. As it was he put
guards around the place, had a
big ex-cop down from Boston to
gc everywhere with him. I saw
him nothing but a coward, under
the skin.”
(To Be Continued)
OBITUARIES
. _
W. J. WEEKS
Funeral services for W. J. “Ben”
Weeks. 28-year-old World War II
veteran and truck driver who died
suddenly Sunday while visiting
relatives in Goldsboro, will be held
from the chapel of Ward’s Funeral
home today at 2 p. m.
Full military honors by Post 10,
Wilmington American Legion, will
be accorded the young man, vic
tim of a heart attack. Interment
will be in the national cemetery,
He is survived by his widow,
his mother, two sisters and one
brother.
Active pallbearers will be L.
C. and R. J. Cook, J. S. Williams,
Earl Williams, L. C. Johnson and
James O’Shields.
DONALD MORI SON BALDWIN
CLARKTON, May 14 — Funeral
services for Donald Morrison Bald
win, Sr., 70, retired mail carrier
who died at his home here Tues
day morning were scheduled to be
held at Crarkton Baptist church,
yesterday at 3 o’clock. He had
been confined to his bed for the
past six years.
He is the son of the late Charles
K. and Mrs. Kate Baldwin and is
survived by his wife, the form
er Janie Campbell; one son
Donald Baldwin, Jr.; one grand
son; two brothers, Neil Baldwin
of Elizabethtown, and C. Wess
Baldwin of Clarkton.
*
J. D. W. WILLIAMS
TABOR CITY, May 14—Funeral
services for J. D. W. Williams
were scheduled to be held yester
day afternoon at 3 o’clock at the
Jessup Inman Funeral home. Rev.
Clyde Prince officiated and inter
ment followed in Norris cemetery.
JOHN LEIDY HOLSHOUSER
CHAPEL HILL May 14—Funeral
services for John Leidv Holshouser
40, well-known Chapel Hill pharm
acist who died in Duke hospital at
4:30 o’clock yesterday were held
in Rockwell at 11 o’clock yester
day morning.
Mr. Holshouser was a member
of the Chapel Hill Rotary club
and the Evangelical and Reform
church of Rockwell.
Surviving are a son, John Hols
houser, Jr., 8: his mother, Mrs.
Cora (J. M.) Holshouser of Rock
well. and three brothers and one
sister: Jesse R. Holshouser,
Greensboro; David M. Holshouser,
New York City: Leslie C. Hols
houser, Rockwell, and Mrs. Elsie
H. Lentz. Rockwell: and two
nephews and one niece.
MRS. ETTIE ZIMLER HARPER
MEARES
TABOR CITY, May 14.—Funeral
services for Mrs. Ettie Zimler Har
per Meares, 68, Rt. 3, Whiteville,
who died at her home Wednesday
afternoon at 2 p. m. after a length
ly illness, will be held Thursday
afternoon at 3 o’clock from the Mt.
Sinia Baptist church with Rev.
Joe Coble officiating. Interment
will follow in the church ceme
Itery.
Mrs. Meares is survived by one
daughter, Mrs. Lillie R. Singletary
of the home; two sons, Taft Meares
of the home and John M. Meares.
of Clayton; she also has several
grandchildren and great grandchil
dren.
GEORGE THOMAS SHEPARD
Funeral services for George
Thomas Shepard, 81, who died at
his residence on Middle Sound at
6:10 a. m. yesterday after a long
illness, will be held Friday after
noon at 2 o’clock the Advent
Christian church.
The Rev. J. L. Davis will of
ficiate and interment will follow
in Prospect cemetery.
The body will remain at the
Harrell-Coble Funeral home until
11 a. m. Friday, at ’hich time it
will be taken to the church to lie
in state until the funeral hour.
Mr. Shepard was an active mem
ber of the Advent Christian church
for 39 year- and served as Sun
day School Superintendent and as
a member of the board of deacons
for 35 years. He was a life long
resident of Middle Sound.
Surviving are his wife, Mrs,
Laura Blanton Shepard; four sons,
A. Z., D. L.,' W. M., all of Middle
Sound; and Rev. H. K. Shepard
of Panama City, Florida; two
daughters, Mrs. M. C. Pierce of
Middle Sound, and Mrs. H. S.
Pierce of Midway Park; foster sis
ter, Mrs. Lizzie Smith of Wilming
ton’, 22 grandchildren, and four
great grandchildren.
Active pallbearers are Jessie A.
Glurganous, L. R. Blake, O. J.
Pierce, W. F. Miller, Sr., and Bill
Reynolds.
Honorary pallbearers are Addi
son Hewlett, G. W. Trask, L. J.
Coleman, H. R. Gardner, James
M. Hall, ' J. W. Reaves, C. E.
Shepard, Harry Shepard, John Or
rell, J. J- Burney, L. A. Covil, !
Winfield Smith and John Sanders.
DIAPER FIGURES
IN DEVOLL CASE
Officers Maintain No New
Developments In
Brunswick Mystery
Special To The Star
SOUTHPORT, May 14 — Bruns
wick county officers late today
reported no new developments in
the investigation of the myste
rious death of Sgt. David J. De
voll, whose body was round last
Friday with a shotgun or pistol
wound in his neck.
Attaches at the Myrtle Beach
Army Air Base have declined to
admit or deny that a suspect is
being held there in connection with
the Devoll investigation.
One officer, working on the
case, who asked that his name be
kept secret, said that a baby’s
diaper, found in the car of the
dead man may figure prominent
ly in tAe case.
It was also learned from the of
ficer that a “mysterious man”
is being detained in the case. He
said the man, reportedly held at
Myrtle Beach is the husband of
the woman, whose child’s diaper
was found in the car last Fri
day.
Just what connection the diap
er has to the murder of Devoll or
the custody of the man, reported
held, was not explained by the
officer.
As far as could be learned late
tonight, no reports from the
FBI laboratory on the finger
prints, photographs and red dust
particles sent there by local of
ficers, have been received.
Devoll’s body rvas found just
north of the South Carolina line
last Friday morning about 10
o’clock. Officers believe he was
shot in South Carolina and his
body transported to the spot where
it was found.
Sheriff White and his deputies
are still working on the case, a
Brunswick deputy said tonight.
I Port City Items
The Georgia Barton Class of the
Temple Baptist church will meet
with Mrs. A. J. Huffham, 312 S.
17th street, Thursday evening at 8
o’clock.
Rabbi Friedman will speak on
“The Best kind of Husband,” at
Friday evening’s meeting at 8
o’clock at B’nai Israel Synagogue.
Miss Dorothy Wells, field direct
or of Girl Scouts in the Wilming
ton district, announced yesterday
that there would be a meeting of
Brownie leaders this morning at 10
o’clock in the Community Center
Second and Orange street.
A 1935 Ford sedan is scheduled
to be auctioned to the public on
Saturday, May 17, at McMillian
and Cameron company by Alcohol
Tax Unit agents, it was reported
yesterday.
Mrs. Dorothy Bordeaux, 802
Greenfield street, reported to police
the theft of her child’s bicycle
last night. The bike was painted
yellow and valued at $27.50, police
reported.
It has been announced by Harold
Sternberger, publicity chairman
of the Red Men, that there will be
an important meeting of the Red
Men and Pocahontas, Thursday,
May loth at 8:00 p. m. at the
Junior Order Hall. Councilman
Edward Ycyop, Great Sacham of
North Carolina, will act as toast
master. Charlie Taylor will en
tertain with his acts. Margeratte
Lee FormyDuval and Billy Mc
Claughon pupils of Miss Agnes
Chasten will give a piano solo.
Henry Amurian, organist, of the
5th Ave. Baptist church, will ren
der several auditions. All members
are urged to be present.
In another of a series of broad
cast highlighting the Organized
Surface division 6-29, Naval Re
serve with headquarters in Wil
mington Lt. Commander John Wil
son, commanding officer and Lt.
Henry Bost were interviewed over
WMFD by Ben McDonald, Star
News round-the-town reporter, last
night. Another in the series will
be aired next Wednesday at 0:35
p. m.
Staff Sergeant Charles M. Hines,
of the 505th Airborne division, is
spending a 20 day leave with his
mother, Mrs. Margaret Hines, at
• her home in Maffitt Village. Sgt.
Hines was a member of Test Force
Frigid in Alaska.
Fresh from a triumphant ap
pearance last night at the Uni
versity of North Carolina, Chapel
Hill, Charlie Spivak and his or
chestra will arrive here this after
noon aboard a special bus to open
the summer season at Wnghtsville j
Beach at 9 o’clock tonight.
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FOR 4 DAY MEET
Legion Convention To Get
Underway June 14 At
Carolina Beach
The four day state convention
of the American Legion, to be held
at Carolina Beach in June, will
be filled with events from Sat
urday afternoon, June 14, when
the 40 and 8 presents the “Wreck,"
on Tuesday. June 17, at 1:30 p. m.
when the “largest fish dinner in
history” will be served to 10,000
members of the Legion and auxi
liary.
Over 25,000 people, including
Legionnaires, members of the
auxiliary and their families, are
expected to attend the convention.
Approximately 40 girls represent
ing their local Legion Posts will
compete for the title of “Miss
North Carolina American Legion”
on Sunday at 3 p. m. in a contest
in front of the Bame hotel. The
girl chosen will receive $500 worth
of summer apparel and a free
seven-day vacation at Carolina
Beach.
On Sunday there will be the
executive board banquet of the
auxiliary; memorial service at
Carolina Beach Baptist church,
conducted by the state Chaplain
and the Rev. Ben B. Ussery, pas
tor; and the Legion Queen corona
tion ball.
One of the highlights of the con
vention will come on Monaay aft
ernoon when 1,000 Navy men and 1
Marines will stage a mock inva
sion, assaulting a 300-yard stretch
of Carolina Beach from five ships
of Navy transport division 121,
and 12 landing barges of the Sec
ond Marine division. Camp Le- i
juene.
On Monday the drum and bugle j
corps contest in front of the Bame
hotel; the go-getters banquet at
Ocean Plaza; dance at the Ocean
Plaza; and a fireworks show over
the ocean during which $1,500
worth of fireworks will be shot
from boats.
Election of officers for the
Legion and for the auxiliary will
take place on Tuesday following
an auxiliary breakfast and preced
ing the joint fish dinner.
O’HENRY SOCIETY TO
ELECT NEW OFFICERS
The O'Henry Literary Society of
New Hanover High school will elect
officers for the 1947-48 school term
today at 8:50 a. m. in the O'Henry
clubroom, it was announced last
night by Miss Katherine Hunter,
president.
Winner of the annual O'Henry
Literary Society short story con
test will be known Saturday after
noon. Participants from the Eng
lish, Journalism, and any other
interested student in the high school
entered the contest which is un
der the direction of Mrs. Eliza
Collins, advisor.
Mrs. Ben McDonald and Ben Mc
Donald, radio commentator, are
judges for the event and they will
judge the stories on their neatness,
grammar, interesting subject and
other parts. They were judges for
the contest last year.
Officers of the O'Henry club for
the 1946-47 school term are Miss
Katherine Hunter, president: Miss
Lorraine D'Lugin, vice-president;
Miss Libya Lynch, secretary and
treasurer; and Miss Jane Perry,
scribe.
The bays and islands of New
York harbor have a combined
j shore line of 771 miles. j
JOLSON
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REALTY TRANSFERS
A. Q. Dauford to J. S. Crowley,
lots 22 and 23. block three. Bor
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Richard O. Harding to Eugenia
B. Todd, lot 29, block four, Co
lonial village.
Annie Belle Whitfield to Walter
Tillman, lot 16, Allen property.
Lucille M. Marvin to David R.
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