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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, June 08, 1947, SECTION A, Image 9

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BUCS FAIL CHESHIRE; BOW TO SPINS. 3-2
—---★-*___________ y
.
™ Today we got an idea.
It may rot meet with any approval, and it may be
little bit wild, but it’s a plan that can’t hurt Wil
mington and might be worth plenty as far as city
advertising goes.
Buried in the news of the sports world yesterday was
,tory from Philadelphia that said the British Ryder Cup
* ]ferg were planning to come to the United States to try
for revenge on the Americans for a defeat in 1937 at South
Irt, England.
Ed Dudley, president of the Professional Golfers
association, claims the matches will be played, de
spite reports to the contrary.
But. the British have said they can’t perform in Sep
tember 'at the Lorraine Country club, Dayton, Ohio, as
tarlier planned, and will probably get to this country in
November.
You can’t play golf in November in Ohio, so the
Dayton course has ruled out the date and scheduled
matches, which coupled with the announcement that
the PGA hopes to hold the classic somewhere in the
south or west, makes us wonder why an invitation to
bring John Bull and his golf clubs here, couldn’t be ex
tended.
Now, before you say that only a big city could attract
m international tournament let’s recall that Dayton is a
,ro0d bit smaller than most of the metropolitan centers of
[he country, and the event was first scheduled to be held
*V,erP The golfers want a good course ... we doubt se
riously if they care at all about the population of the
eity. And since it will be autumn by the time the
tournament will be held, it’s gotta be south.
The chances are strong that either a city further <outh
than Wilmington, or one on the southwest coast, will be
ultimately selected, but there could be no harm in seeing
what kind of a reaction would follow an attractive invita
tion to the PGA to stage the thing here.
As we understand it, the Cape Fear Country club
will be just about ready at that time. The face-lift
ing out at the club will, according to the reports we get,
force golfers to play, not only eighteen holes, of golf.
No two holes will have the same type hazards and
greens, which is a top test of a golfer’s ability.
The British PGA has officially accepted America’s
Invitation to resume the matches which were interrupted
by war, and we may suppose the event will be an annual
affair. Therefore if Wilmington would like to be consider
ed for future events here, it should start making it known
now.
. m r i a _ 1 1 A A1 A..
A flat refusal to come here, couldn’t hurt the city,
tnd would let people know there is a Wilmington,
North Carolina that thinks enough of itself and its
golf courses to make an attempt to get something big.
The publicity couldn’t be other than good, as long as
the invitation was made with foresight, and with no thought
of penny-pinching. A refusal would have to be accompan
ied with a letter of “thanks for the invite” and “glad to
know you’re interested,” and “keep in touch with us for
later tourneys.”
No salesman sells a big order the first time he en
ters a firm, but after continual efforts he may take a
lot of business from the nut that was first too hard to
crack. ( The nut in this case might be the PGA ....
not anyone in particular).
Even if the country club’s course wasn’t in the best of
shape, an effort to get the Ryder Cup contests here should
he made. Remember the case of Bobby Locke .... he
would have given Wilmington something few cities in the
nation have seen. A chance to watch a man who may be
come the greatest golfer in the world. And he wouldn’t
have cost much either. Today, you couldn’t get Locke to
consider playing an exhibition here for less than a thousand
skins, but last spring he could have been had for $350.
The fact that he accepted, or was ready to ac
cept an invitation to play in Wilmington, was in itself
t surprise. If the Ryder Cup tournament committee
should agree to listen to Wilmington proposals, it would
be admittedly surprising, but that’s no reason to skip
the issue.
What it would cost we don’t know. Just how a city
pes about attracting such a classic, we admit we don’t
know, But, there must be someone who does . . . and we
know there’s an advertising fund for the city of Wil
mington.
It’s not such a bad idea. Think it over for a little
whi!e, and the logic in making the effort will suddenly
erystalize and you’ll see the good points. A defeatist
attitude is really the only thing that can spoil a great
opportunity.
It’s seldom anyone has something he believes in. We
p ieve in Wilmington, and its chances for a great sports
Jture. A guy can sit down each day and write thousands
o' words asking why there isn’t a large indoor arena here,
why this lack exists, and why that lack exists.
Most of the time it doesn’t do any good. Maybe
won’t this time. Wilmington’s sports future is only
bright as the men who guide it.
_ Guide it._
VETERANS
Enroll Now for the New Class of
G. I. FLIGHT TRAINING
NOW BEING FORMED
Courses / Private
Available Commercial
. ) Flight Instructor
In \ Multi-Engine
Pennington Flying Service
Blneiltenlhal Airport - Dial 2-1381
*®Ies-Charter Flights—Flight Instruction
TEAM PLAYS DUNN
TODAY; LAMB SET
TO HURL FOR BUCS
Lefty Cheshire did everything
but trot out the cops last night,
but he couldn’t bring home a vic
tory for the Wilmington Pirates,
and Sanford’s pace-setting Spin
ners gained a full game on the
Bucs in the Tobacco State league.
The pirates lost 3-2, as local
batters were helpless before the
blazing fastball of John McFadden,
who relieved Jim House in the
fourth.
The Pirates journey to Dunn to
day to clash with the Twins, and
Roy Lamb is slated to get tha
hurling nod. The Twins return here
tomorrow for a twin bill at Legion
stadium.
Last night Sanford opened scor
ing in the first frame, when Guinn
reached on an infield miscue by
Muscemeci and took second on the
first of two passed b Us by Bill
Alsnauer. Wiison grounded to the
infield, and Guinn was trapped be
tween third and home, Wilson tak
ing second. Nesselrode reached on
Bob LeBlanc’s boot, and Wilson
moved to third to set the stage
for a double steal, Wilson scor
ing. Then Nessing doubled to left,
scoring Nesselrode with the sec
ond run of the frame. Wilson stroll
ed, but Cheshire stopped Hedrick
on an infield roller.
Cheshire moved along brilliant
ly, fanning nine and holding the
Spins to five hits, but his mates
didn’t begin hitting pay dirt until
the fourth.
House was knocked out in the
fourth. Bridges started it with a
walk. Andy Poklemba drilled a hit
to center, Bridges checking in at
second. LeBianc forced the Buc
first sacker at third, and then
Saeckel strolled loading the bases.
Alsnauer popped to second base,
and Poklemba pulled a Pete Reiser
scoring from third with a great
slide. Cheshire aided his own
cause, singling home LeBianc, and
McFadden came in to fan Musce
meci, the first of ten strikeouts in
his five and one third innings.
In the sixth Benton brought the
large Saturday night crowd to its
feet with a one handed stab of a
liner off the bat of Nessing.
The first half of the seventh was
the fatal frame. Hedrick singled,
and was forced at second by
Butcher. McFadden singled to left,
sending Butcher to third, and a
long fly to Benton by Guinn did the
damage.
The Bucs threatened in the last
of the ninth and it was Cheshire
again. Hesingled with one out, but
Muscemeci and Benton were easy
outs.
McFadden, hurling brilliantly,
fanned Steskel, Alsnauer and
Cheshire in succession in the sixth.
SANFORD AB K H O A E
Guinn, 2b- 4 0 0 2 1 0
Shofner, lb_ 3 0 1 4 0 0
Wilson, cf_ 4 114 0 0
Nesselrode, rf_ 3 1 0 0 0 0
Nessing, 3b_ 4 0 1 2 2 0
Watson, If _ 3 0 0 1 0 0
Hedrick, c _ 4 0 1 14 0 0
Butcher, ss _ 4 1 0 0 0 0
House, p _ 1 0 0 0 1 0
McFadden, p _ 3 0 10 10
TOTALS —__ 33 3 5 27 5 Q
WILMINGTON AB ft H OAR
Muscemeci, ss__ 5 0 0 2 3 1
Benton, cf _-_ 3 0 2 4 0 0
Hardisky, 2b__ 3 0 0 5 1 0
Bridges, lb_ 2 0 0 4 0 0
Poklemba, If_- 4 1110 0
Le Blanc, 3b_4 10 0 11
Steckel, rf_ 3 0 0 1 0 0
Alsnauer, c_ 4 0 0 9 2 0
Cheshire, p_ 4 0 2 1 2 0
TOTALS_ 32 2 5 27 9 2
SANFORD_ 200 000 100—3
WILMINGTON _ 00 200 000—2
Runs batted in: Nessing: Alsnauer,
Cheshire, Guinn. Two-base hits: Nessing,
Benton. Stolen bases; Nesselrode, Wil
son, Benton. Left on bases: Sanford 7;
Wilmington 9. Bases on balls: off Ches
hire 4, House 4. Struck out, by Ches
hire 8; McFadden 10, House 4. Hits off:
L^use in 3 2-3 3 innings; McFadden in 3
1-3 2. Hit by pitcher, by McFadden (Ben
ton). Passed balls: Alsnauser (2). Win
ning pitcher: McFadden. Umpires: Re
veille and Mitchell. Time of game: 1:55.
SENIOR CLASS A
SOFTBALL STORY
Player Team AB K H BA.
Covington (Spofford) _ 36 13 16 . 444
Benson (Spofford) _ 38 20 17 . 433
Brown (Spofford (_26 S 11 .423
McPhatter (Optical) _ 34 11 14 .412
Kaylor (Optical)_ 37 17 15 . 405
Rogers (Optical) - 36 15 14 .389
Worley (Omega) _ 50 12 IB .380
Surles (ACL)_X 17 12 .375
Boyd (Omega)_ 39 16 14 .359
Mason (Reserve)_ 28 8 10 . 357
LEADERS
Hits—Worley (Omega) 19.
Runs—Benson (Spofford), Lee (Omega)
20.
Runs batted in—Benson (Spofford) 16.
Doubles—Rogers (Optical) 5.
Triples - Lamb (ACL), McPhatter
(Optical) 3.
Home rune—Three tied with three
each.
Stolen bases—Strickland (USNR) 8.
Pitching—Cook (Spofford Mills) 8-1,
,889.
Strike out—King (Optical) 64.
STANDINGS
Team Won Lost Pcf.
Spofford Mills _10 2 .833
City Optical _11 3 .786
Atlantic Coast Line_ 9 4 . 692
Alpha Omega _ 6 9 .400
Brotherhood of Ry Clerks 2 10 .167
Naval Reserve _ 2 12 .143
‘BAMA TO BIG LEAGUES
TUSCALOOSA, Ala., June 7—
At least 22 former University of
Alabama baseball players have
made the grade in the major
leagues. Five members of both
Alabama's 191E and 1925 squads
played big league baseball.
RED SPRINGS NIPS
CLINTON BY 3-2
Special to the Star-News
RED SPRINGS, June 7 — The
cellar dwelling Red Springs Rob
ins upset Clinton, 3-2 here tonight
behind the effec-ve hurling of
righthander Dan Carter, who held
the second place Blues to four hits
in going the route for the Robins.
Tied at two runs apiece going
into the last half of the ninth,
with two men out, Carter wallop
ed a long triple to right center
ana scored the winning run when
Rogers hit safely to left.
CLINTON AB E H O A E
Uhls, 2b-lf _ 4 110 3 0
Pare, 3b_ 4 0 0 1 0 0
Evans, cf__ 4 0 0 2 0 0
Marsh, as_ 4 0 0 4 1 1
Vorrell, If-p_ 4 0 0 2 0 0
Askew, rf _ 3 0 0 1 0 0
Mungo, lb _ 4 0 0 8 1 0
Ward, c - 4 1 2 8 0 0
Stone, p - 2 0 1 0 0 0
Cielinski, 2b _ 2 0 0 0 2 0
TOTALS- 35 2 4 26 7 1
RED SPRINGS AB R H O A E
Rogers, ss_ 5 1 2 2 4 1
Magini, lb _ 4 0 2 7 0 2
Wood, 2b _ 4 0 2 4 2 1
Brown, cf_ 4 0 0 2 0 0
Dunkelburger, If_ 2 0 1111
Burch, If - 2 0 110 0
Parnell, 3b_ 4 0 112 1
Wolfe, rf - 4 0 0 5 0 0
Bulloch, c_____ 4 114 0 0
Carter, p- 4 110 0 0
TOTALS- 37 3 11 27 8 6
CLINTON- 002 000 000—2
RED SPRINGS___ 000 020 001—3
Runs batted in: Stone, Rogers Wood,
Bulloch. Two-base hits: Stone.' Three
base hits: Dunkelburger, Carter. Stolen
bases: Parnell. Left on bases: Clinton 7;
Red Springs 8. Bases on balls: off Car
ter. Struck out, by Carter 4, Stone 3,
Vorrell 3. Hits off: Stone in 4 2-3 7;
Vorrell in 4 innings 4. Wild pitche*:
Stone. Losing pitcher: Vorrell. Time of
game 1:55.
WARSAW MOVES
INTO 4TH SPOT
Special To 'lbe Star-News
WARSAW, June ?.—In a wild
and wooly ball game, the Warsaw
Red Sox downed the Smithfield
Leafs, 15-11, to jump into the first
division in a tense Tobacco State
league struggle for fourth place.
Pitcher Faireloth was credited
with the victory, and fanned 10
Leafs after relieving the starting
hurler when Smithfield scored
early in the game.
SMITHFIELD AB R H O A E
Howard, ss_ 5 2 2 2 3 0
Balia, 2b - 5 1 0 2 3 1
Kulkulka, 3b_ 5 1 2 3 3 0
Narron, c- 6 2 2 8 0 0
Mason, cf_ 5 12 110
Eonta, If- 5 12 0 11
Hicks, p - 10 10 0 0
Pehler, lb _ 5 117 12
Benton, p- 3 0 0 0 1 0
Ossosky, p- 1110 10
Woodard, rf_ 2 0 1 0 0 0
Haines, rf- 4 0 0 1 0 0
TOTALS- 47 11 13 24 14 4
WARSAW AB R H O A E
Jordan, 3b-ss__ 6 14 12 3
Newhouser, 2b_2 10 112
Scrobola, lb _ 4 2 2 6 2 0
Bohannon, If_ 5 113 0 0
Stephens, rf - a 2 x t „ o .
T. Jones, c- 3 3 1 11 0 0
Andrews, cf _ 4 2 2 2 1 0
Southerland, ss _ 3 1112 0
Fortune, cf_N_ 11110 0
Faireloth, p _ 3 110 2 1
Johnson, p _ 1 0 1 0 1 0
TOTALS- 37 15 15 27 11 6
SMITHFIELD_ 020 041 103—11
WARSAW - 120 032 25x—15
Runs batted in; Hicks, Howard, Nar
ron 2, Balia, Kulkulka 2, Jordan 3, Jones
3, Newborne, Faireloth, Fortune, John
son, Andrews. Two-base hits: Jones,
Stephens, Scrobola 2, Fairciotn. Three
base hits: Jordan. Home runs: Narron.
Stolen bases: Newbourne 2, Southerland.
Left on bases: Smithfield 9. Warsaw 7.
Bases on balls: off Hicks 3, Benton, Fair
cloth, Johnson. Struck out, by Hioks 2,
Benton 3, Ossosky 2, Faireloth 10, John
son 2. Hits off: Hicks in 1 2-3 innings 2;
Benton in 4 1-3 5; Ossosky in 2 8; Fair
cloth in 7 1-3 10. Wild pitches: Fain
cloth. Winning pitcher: Faireloth. Los
ing pitcher: Hicks. Time of game: 2:10.
MULLOY MOVES ,
INTO NET FINALS, J
MIDWEST MATCH:
By SKIPPER PATRICK
KANSAS CITY, June 7 — UP) —
Gardnar Mulloy of Coral Gables,
Fla., advanced to the finals of the
men’ singles play in the Heart of
America Tennis tournament today
as his opponent, colorful little
Francisco Segura, Ecuador, con
ceded the match after dropping
the first game of the fifth set.
Mulloy, fifth ranking U. S. ama
teur, won by the score of 5-7, 6-2,
6-8, 9-7- 1-0.
Segura, who blew the match
point in the fourth set, explained
that he was overcome by the heat
and couldn’t continue after Mulloy |
had turned on a blazing attack
for a 1-love advantage in the fifth.
Playing in humid 90-degree
weather, both boys were com
pletely exhausted when the match
ended.
‘T couldn’t stand the heat any
longer.” Segura said. "It was the
first time this year I ran into
anything like this.”
Needing only one point, to close
the match at four sets Segura
twice served into the net and he
was through for the day.
Mulloy picked up considerable
steam after the first set and gave
Segura a good chase over the
back court that finally broke the
stamina of the Ecuadorian.
Legion Team Opens Play
In Red Springs Tomorrow
Wilmington’s bid for American
Legion baseball honors this year
starts tomorrow night at 7:45 in
Red Springs under the lights, and
Tom Davis, coach of the Port City
entry into the loop, last night was
slightly worried about his lads aft
er a short practice drill with Win
ter Park.
Davis had no definite idea of
which one of six hurlers would
start the opener. The team re
turns here for another tilt at Le
gion stadium Tuesday night at 7:45
o’clock.
TPt r ..in ...ill -1_* i _
-— - - _ vuuuv 11AU lllVUliUC
man sometime tomorrow from a
group including Tracy Duval,
Claude King, Jere Hilburn, Char
ley Smith, Jim Crawford and Jim
Pepper.
The Wilmington infield, at pres
ent reads: Jim Stoudenmire at
third, Gene Smith at short, Mike
Austin, second, and Bob Lewis,
first base.
have been hitting the ball hard in
early drills, but the teams lacks
punch in the line-up, and Davis is
just as concerned over his offen
sive as he is the hurling strength.
An outfield trio will be selected
from Lyn Grisson, Johnny Crow
ley, Fritz Mintz, and Louis Tartt.
The catching duties will be divided
between Billy Smith and Lloyd
Parker.
BRAVES* SENSATION - - By Jack Sord?
■ i
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'BoSrfoA BRAKES
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rirft/ASe- FoR -tZie -t&F
Sammy Blows Up
In Capitol Open
WASHINGTON, June 7— Cff) —
Sam Snead putted himself right
out of the lead in the $10,000 Na
tional Capital Open today. And
three golfers gratefully moved in
to a tie for first place at the end
of 54 holes.
Tied for the lead, at 203, are:
George Payton of Hampton, Va.,
the Virginia Open champion, who
muffed a chance to take first
place undisputed, when he three
putted the 18th hole. He wound up
with a three-under-par 69.
Bobby Locke, the pride of Jo
hannesburg, South Africa, who had
a 68.
National Open Champion Lloyd
Msngrum of Chicago, who shot a
66, the day’s best score.
Snead started out with a three
stroke lead, but he lopped that off
and another one, too. He wound
up with a 73 (compared with his
previous 66 and 65) in a four way
tie for fourth place, a stroke be
aind the leaders.
With Snead at 204 were Lew
Worsham of Oakmont. Pa.; Ed
(Porky) Oliver of Wilmington, Del.
and the tennis champion, Ells
worth Vines, Los Angeles.
But the story of the day as in
what happened to Snead. And it
can be told quickly, for the Hot
Springs, Va., pro wasted no time.
Playing in the same threesome
with Payton, Snead missed a
three-foot putt on the first hold
and settled for a par four. Payton
got a birdie three.
On No. 2 he drove into a sand
trap. He blasted out—way out. The
ball cleared not only the green,
but also the spectators around it.
Snead squawked some news pho
tographers were to blame. They
said no, they shot after Snead did.
Snead finally got a five, and
Payton a birdie three.
A red-faced cop chased the pho
tographers, and red-faced temper
got Snead.
OVER .500
TUSCALOOSA, Ala., June 7—
The last time that an Alabama
baseball team lost more games
than it won during a season was
in 1926 when the Crimson Tide
won 11 and lost 12 to drop below
the .500 mark. !
LUMBERTON WHIPS
DUNN-ERWIN, 9-3

Special to the Star-News
DUNN, June 7 — The Lumber
ton Cubs lifted themselves into a
tie with Dunn-Erwin here tonight,
by defeating the Twins 9-3, aided
by four twin errors and the gen
erosity of Dunn hurlers.
Lumberton iced the game in the
fourth, when they scored seven
runs on only two hits, on a home
run by Charley Jamin with two
men aboard.
Four walks and two errors in
the big frame set the stage for
Jamin’s circuit clout. Pearsall
also homered for the Cubs.
Wilmington invades Dunn to
morrow.
LUMBERTON AB R H O A E
Erheardt, s* _ 4 0 13 6 1
Stanley, 3b _ 4 10 110
Marx, lb-4 119 0 0
Garcia, lb_ 0 0 0 1 0 0
Jamin, if _ 5 110 0 0
Pearsall, cf- 3 2 1 4 0 0
Cavaness, 2b_ 4 1 0 3 5 1
Dixon, rf- 4 10 10 0
Knisely, c - 3 2 3 5 2 0
Morman, p _ 4 0 1 0 2 0
TOTALS _35 « 8 27 16 2
DUNN-ERWIN AB R H O A E
Miller, ss_ 5 0 3 2 2 0
Bell, 2b_,_ 4 0 0 2 2 1
Jackson, rf'_ 2 0 0 0 0 0
Denning, c _ 2 116 0 0
McQuillan, cf_ 4 0 1 3 0 1
Scott, If- 4 1110 0
Leach, lb_ 3 1 0 9 0 1
Hutchins, 3b _ 4 0 113 0
Shepherd, p_ 1 0 0 0 2 0
Hutchley, p_ 1 0 0 0 1 0
xMelvin_ 1 0 0 0 0 0
xxJones_ 0 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS_ 31 3 7 24 10 4
x—Fanned for Hutchley in 9th.
XX—Ran for Bell in 9th.
LUMBERTON _ 00 1 704 OOx—9
DUNN-ERWIN _ 000 100 002—3
Huns batted in: Miller, Bell, McQuillan,
Erheardt, Stanley, Marx 2, Jamin 3,
Pearsall, Knisley. Two-base hits: Mc
Quillan, Home runs: Jamin, Pearsall.
Left on bases: Dunn 7; Lumberton 8.
Bases on balls—off: Morman 8, Shepherd
5. Struck out, by Morman 4, Shepherd 5,
Hutchley. Hits off: Shepherd in 4 in
nings 4; Hutchley in 4 4. Losing pitcher:
Shepherd. Time of game: 2:00.
Cape Fear League
Clubs Clash Today
The Pepsi-Cola semi-pro base
ballers clash today in Legion sta
dium with an invading Acme
Delco team as the Cape Fear loop
hits its peak in season play. Win
ter Park’s powerful Rangers jour
ney to Seagate, and Hampstead
plays host to the Masonboro
Clamdiggers in other CF tilts.
At the stadium Skeet James will
send either Vic Gore or Murphy
Scoggins to the knoll in an effort
to gain another win over Acme.
Barney Rogers will counter with
Armon Gainey, ex-Wilmington Pi
rate hurler.
Howard Pepper will be the
pitcher for Masonboro as Skipper
Pirn Farrow tries to halt the hard
hitting Hampstead squad. Dan
Geoiige will porbably do the catch
ing for the Clamdiggers. The bat
tery for Hampstead will be Hor
ace Whedbee and ex-NHHS star
Rudy Johnson.
Frank Hines’ Rangers will be
trying to regain undisputed pos
sesion of the circuit when Dune
Futrelle takes the hill against the
Seagaters of Johnny Wallace.
Wallace will counter with Jack
Allen.
Hurlers have taken over the
spotlight in the semi-pro loop as
the teams get ready for the
stretch drive. Hampstead, after a
slow start, looms as one of the
league's powerhouses. Pepsi-Cola,
| blowing hot and cold in early sea*
I son games, still desperately* needs
a first string backstop. In Fri»
day’s game under Legion arcsi
Shunev Brittain donned catching
pads for James, and for three in
nings the Cola-men looked like
pros. Brittain is not in condition
yet, however, and the team ha$
no first string catcher.
SIX OUT OF EIGHT
TUSCALOOSA, Ala., June 7-»
Between 1913 and 1920, University
of Alabama baseball teams won
championships in the old S.I.A.A;
conference six times in eight
. years.
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