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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, June 21, 1947, Image 8

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11:00—Mark’s Machinery Present*
2i ;30—Piano Playhouse
12:00—Noon Day Musical
22:30— The American Farmer
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SATl RDAY. JUNE ‘.'I, 1941—WJNC
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, 9:00—Johnson’s Rexall Drug News
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g:30—Saturday Morning Mat. Pine Lodge
10:00—Smilin’ Ed McConnell—mbs
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OVER THE NETWORKS
NETWORK PROGRAMS
Time is eastern standard. For central
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tain standard subtract two hours. Some
| local stations change hour of relay to
fit local schedules. Last minuf program
changes cannot be included.
SATURDAY, JUNE 21
(For East. Daylight add one hour)
Evening
5:00—Rhapsody From Rockies—nbc
News Broadcast 15 Minutes—ebs
Dance Music Band—mbs
;515—Word From the Country—ebs
5:30—The Boston Tune Party—nbc
Saturday Sports Review—ebs
Cecil Brown Comment—mbs
5:45—The Art of Living—nbc
World News Commentary—ebs
Jan August repeat—mbs-wast
6:00—The Poughkeepsie Regatta—nbc
St. Louis Municipal Opera—ebs
Hawaii Calls Musicians—mbs
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Robert Q. Lewis Show—ebs
News and Sports—mbs
6:45—To Be Announced—ebs
F. H. LaGuardia Talk—mbs
7 :00—Life of Riley, Drama—nbc
Vaughn Monroe’s Show—ebs
Twenty Questions Quiz—mbs
7:30—Truth or Consequences—nbc
Sweeney and March—ebs
Better Half Quiz—mbs
7:55—Five Minutes News—ebs
8:00—Saturday Hit Parade—nbc
Bill Goodwin Comedy—ebs
Mighty Casey, Skit—mbs
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Saturday Night Serenade—ebs
High Adventure Drama—mbs
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This . . Hollywood, Play—ebs
Chicago Theater of the Air—mbs
9:30—The Grand Ole Oprv—nbc
Oklahoma Roundup—ebs
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Times for NBC. CBS and MBS are
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then an hour later by standard, are
correct as listed for either time.
BUSINESS MAN IN
RECORDERS COURT
ON EMPLOYE CHARGE
H. Howard, dignified appearing
businessman, appeared briefly in
Recorder's court yesterday to hear
his case, involving young women
whom he had allegedly attempted
to employe as his secretary, con
tinued until Tuesday.
Continuance was granted upon
motion of Solicitor James King,
who said that other warrants are
expected. Howard was released on
$300 bond. King said he held a half
dozen warrants charging Howard
with attempted assault upon a fe
male.
Defense Attorney Aaron Gold
berg agreed to the continuance al
though he said he was ready for
trial and had 25 businessmen ready
to testify in Howard’s behalf.
The warrants charge that Ho
ward, who maintained offices in the
Trust building, was more interested
in applicants’ personal appearances
than in their ability.
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FORMERLY THE MORRIS PLAN RANK *
1946 Soap Box Derby Champion
Gives Guidance To Local Boys
Prospective Entrants
Should Start Building
Early, Klecan Says
By GILBBERT KLECAN
1946 All-American Soap 3ox Der
by Winner, Representing the San
Diego Daily Journal.
I’ve been asked m; ">y times since
winning the Soap Box Derby na
tional championship, sponsored by
the Chevrolet Division at Akron,
Ohio, last year, what one piece of
advice I would give boys who will
be trying to win in 1947.
Above everything else, I’,d say:
“Start building your car early, so
you’ll have plenty of time to experi
ment.”
J almost aiun i Will 111 oan iiicgu
in the local Soap Box Derby spon
sored by the San Diego Daily
Journal last year, because I didn’t
start building soon enough.
I had all the wood and tools I
needed, but I just didn’t get to
work as fast as I should have. As
a result, I had to work on the ear
until 2 a. m. on the third night
before the San Diego race, until 2
a. m. the second night before the
race, and all night the night be
fore the race. Kven then I didn t
know whether my car would steer
well enough.
My car looked a great deal dif
ferent from the rest of the boys’
cars, and Mr. Lisle Shoemaker, of
the Journal, made me take a
special driving test before the race
to see if my car was safe.
It was, so I got to race.
Among other things, I’d tell boys
who are building their cars that
they should build the car heavy
and then plane or sand it down to
the weight limit.
Also, the boys ought to take lots
of time to break in their new wheel
and axle sets. I put a mixture of
jeweler’s rouge and olive oil in my
wheels, put the wheels on the axles
Gilbert Klecan, of San Diego, immediately after win
ning the 1946 All-American Soap Box Derby at Akron, Ohio.
and spun them for hours to make
sure they were well broken in.
And there’s that old bugaboo of
“streamlining.” Some kids will tell
you that a coaster can only go so
fast down a hill because of the
weight limits. I’m no scientist, but
I feel certain that streamlining is
one of the most important parts
of constructing a Soap Box Der
by racer.
I built mine so that only the top
of my read stuck out in the wind.
I also smeared myself with black
graphite so that, if part of my
arms or shoulders did stick out, the
wind would slide by faster. At
least that’s why I did it.
But the most important thing is
to take lots of time in the building.
If I had been unlucky and my steer
ing hadn’t worked, then I would
never have become the All-Ameri
can Soap Box Derby champion.
And that would have been a ser
ious loss, because I've never had
such a thrill in my life as winning
at Akron, and I doubt if I ever
will have another thrill that will
come close to being so exciting.
"O HAVE
C opyright by Jane Abbott
DU tributed by King Feature* Syndicate
ro KEEP
’^/Jane Abbott | |
CHAPTER FORTY-SIX
Diane awakened the next morn
ing to such bewilderment that it
was several moments before she
could identify her surroundings.
Then she refused to think of what
had brought her here or of the
decision she was here to make.
Instead, she considered the dust
which lay thick on the old furni
ture in the room. It was the par
lor; she had slept on an old settee
in preference to one of the unaired
bedrooms upstairs.
She faced the fact, too. that she
was very hungry. BW she smiled
a little:'Rufus would come! Her
smile lingered as she recalled
some of the incidents of their ar
rival. The Duells—she had had to
go there for the key—had been
suspicious of her claim to owner
ship, of Rufus. Rufus had looked
so grim, hunting for something
which would give them more light
than a match, so relieved when
he found a stub of a candle.
Amusing, affecting the suaveness
of a maitre d’hotel “We have a
room in the west wing, Mrs. Ar
den, with an exceptional view of
the boulevard. Fortunately it is
unoccupied just now.”
But in the next breath he’d said
with an angry decisiveness: “You
can’t stay here!”
She had said: “I’m going to.”
“You’ll have no blanket?.”
“I’ll sleep in my clothes.”
“You’ve no food ”
“Rufus, I’m pioneering! And I
wish you’d go!” She remembered
she had pushed him toward the
door; she had been close to the
limit of her endurance. “Who
knows, maybe Sadie Poole trailed
us here!”
“You forget Sadie Poole!”
He’d gone almost at once, at
least gone out of her house.
Immediately a stark terror had
swept in on her. Strange, awful
shadows had advanced from theJ
corners, hammered on the cur
tainless windows. The candle soon
would be burned out, leaving hei
at the mercy of those shadows,
and she had pulled off her shoes,
loosened her clothes, huddled un
der her top cost on the settee,
scarcely breathing in her unrea
soning apprehension, her eyes
clinging ’o the flickering light un
til with a last sputter it went out.
Then what looked like a diffused
mist had crept toward her and
with a strangled cry she had got
to her feet, rushed to the dcror,
flung it open to run. anywhere
But she had stopped on the thres
hold. She had seen that it was
moonlight, flooding the valley,
misty as it had been in the room:
she had been revealed in it the
bulk of a car at the end of the
lane. Rufus’ car: Rufus out there
She had laughed, soundlessly,
c.inging to the doorframe as the
spasms shook her. Crazy! But herj
heart had steadied and after a;
moment she had gone back to her:
improvised bed, pulled the coati
around her and soon had fallen
asleep.
Rufus was gone now, but he
would come back!
She looked at her wrist watch.
It was almost ten o’clock. She
must find water somewhere in
which to bathe: there was the
creek if none in the house. Pi
oneering.
When she heard his car in the
lane she ran out to meet him. “I
slept like a log and I sponged in
ice water!”
Her slacks were the blue of her
eyes, her hair, tied back with a
narrow ribbon, caught gold from
the sunlight., her eagerness gave
her face an innocent naivete. All
this Rufus saw but only said,
gruffly: “If you’re so on top of th
world, give me a hand writh these
things!”
She observed the bulky pack
DAILY CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1. To schedule
5. Base
9. 60 minutes
10. Norse god
11. Officers who
check ex
penditures
14. Leave out
15. Regret
16 Gold (sym.)
17 100.000
rupees
18 Forbid
19 Grow old
20 Like
21 Raptorial
birds
23 Decorated
letter
i paragraph
beginning i
24 King
of Judah
25 President of
France
11613*
28 Masurium
(sym i
30 Subside
31 Character—
"Little
Women"
32 Slope
33. New Jersey
<abbr i
34 Antelope
(Afr t
35 Sand hill
36 Kingdom.
W Europe
39 American
Indian
40 At one time
41 One of
many layers
42 Obnoxious
plant
DOWN
1. One of the
Twelve
Apostles
2. Type of
architec
ture
3. Mongrel
dog
4 Blunder
5 Self
. impelled
6 Not
working
7 Falsehood
8 Madden
11 African
tree
12 Verbal
13. Prosecutes
judicially
18. A pirate
19. Constella
tion
21. Carting
vehicle
22. Employ
23. White lie
25. Founder
(Pennsyl
vania)
26. A spectacle
27. River
(Asia)
28 Obeyed
29 Simians
32 A dull
witted persoi
Yesterday's Answer
34 A semifluid
butter (India)
35. Native of
Denmark
37 Three
(prefix)
i 38 Humble
* CRYPTOQUOTE—A cryptogram quotation
BPU SLABHRMBU gmr b a h w n pmk
RL KGMWVV KPMAU LS U R J N—C X R I M A.
Yesterday's Cryptoquotc: THE UMPIRE HAS REGARD TO
EQUITY. AND THE JUDGE TO LAW—ARISTOTLE.
ages piled on tlj^ seat. An army
Lianket lay on t'nem. Her nands
went out to take it up, but irre
sistibly fell on Rufus arm. He did
i.ot look as though he had slept
like a log! He was getting out of
the car stiffly.
“Rufus, you dear why do you
bother so for me?’
He looked down into her up
‘urned face, away from it. “Mere
ly my good deed for today, lady.
Nothing moore.” He shook off her
hands. “Quicker we get this stuff
in the sconer we’ll have some cof
fee.”
She took the blanket and an
armful of packages, thinking, re
gretfully: “He isn’t going to let
me thank him for last night! For
this!”
Carrying their load to the kitch
en, dumping it on the table there,
she was suddenly reminded of her
and Bill’s homecoming after their
honeymoon and she leaned
against the table, shaken and
weak before this thrust of reality.
On it came swiftly the realization
that Bill had read her note, hours
ago, a long night ago.
“Fill something with water,”
commanded Rufus from the oil
stove in which ne had managed to
light a flame. “Coffee’s in one of
those bags—measure it out.”
Diane roused gratefully, to do
his bidding.
They drank their coffee sitting
on the doorstep where it was
warm in the sun. They drank it
almost in silence. Along the wind
ing creek the willows made a deli
cate trace-work of gold ad here
there on the hillside were sa
and there on the hillside were spots
ol brilliant color, but they did- not
see it. Rufus said, draining his
cup: “Give me your tickets, Di,
I’ll do something about them.”
“Oh,” cried Diane, starting in
dismay. “There’s Dad! He’ll be
expecting a telegram!”
“Your father didn’t knew?”
The color deepened on Diane’s
cheek. “He thought I was going
to Tim O’Neale’s ranch—I really
was going there—and he thought
I was going for a rest, that 1
needed a rest—”
Rufus refrained from saying
what his expression indicated he
was thinking. Instead he growled:
“Write to your father and I’ll take
it with me.”
“I haven’t paper or pen—”
“You’ll find both and ink in one
of those packages.”
“Rufus!”
“Logical, wasn’t it, to think you
might need ’em?”
She found the writing mate
rials, cleared an end of the kitch
en table and wrote briefly to her
father of her whereabouts. She
added: “Your promise must still
hold.” Underlined it.
When she took it out to Rufus
he was standing by the car. “Di,
it’s too crazy, your staying here
alone. Come along with me now.”
She shook her head. “Last night
1 was frightened, when you went
away. But I won’t be again, not
that way. No, I am going to stay
here. And Rufus,” she put firm
ness in her voice and manner,
“you must not worry about me or
think you have to come out—”
His laugh was short. “You over.
.00 k that I am responsible for
your being here! But for my inter
ference you’d be on your way
.vest at this moment. What’s that
old saying about fools stepping
in?” He got into his car, started
,v, without waiting for her answer.
Diane heated water, found rags,
viped the cupboards clean enough
.0 stow away in them the provi
sions Rufus had brought to her.
She dusted the parlor. She would
sleep again, tonight, on the settee.
She had no feeling of ownership;
oer hands went over the old chairs
and table and whatnot mechani
cally. And before the work was
done she threw down her colths
and went out of the door and
flung herself flat on the grass,
her face deep in it, her hands un
;er her. hard against her breast,
somewhere, somewhere in it, was
he real feeling, the strong thread
n this wretched tangle!
But her fingers felt only numb
-ess that had been so long in her
LUDLOWE BOYS TO BE i
SUES! OF BOYS CAMP
AT PORTER'S NECK
The twin sons of Mr. and Mrs.
Clifton Ludlowe, whose home and
entire personal belongings were
destroyed by fire recently, will
spend next week at the Brigade
Boys camp at Porter’s Neck.
James Copeland, executive di
rector of the Brigade club said
yesterday that he had received a
telegram from Howard Tooley,
public relations director of the
Boys Clubs of America, asking him
to select a deserving boy for a
one week vacation at the Bruce
B. Cameron memorial camp with
all expenses paid by the Borden
company.
The Borden company in a week
ly radio program presented over
CBS every Saturday, awards free
trips to summer camps for deserv
ing boys all over the nation. This
week boys from Wilmington, Kan
sas City, and Pittsburgh will oe
mentioned on the radio show.
In making his selection yester
day Copeland said! “I don’t know
of a more deserving boy than Clif
ton or Christopher Ludlowe and
since the nine-vear-old boys are
twins ,the Brigade will pay the
expenses of one and the Borden
company the other.”
The youngsters will leave this
afternoon at 2 o clock for the camp
for their week’s vacation in com
pany with over 40 other boys,
Copeland said last night.
Janitor Found Not
Guilty On Charge
Of Stealing Fan
Judge Winfield Smith halted the
trial of Hurtis Coleman, 27-year
old Negro janitor accused of steal
ing an electric fan from the office
of the president of the Atlantic
Coast Line railroad, yesterday in
Recorder’s court and ordered po
lice to take two women witnesses
to their apartment and bring into
court the fans at their homes.
The abrupt halt in the trial came
when one women refuted what
wras read by Solicitor James King
as a previously signed statement
given by the Negress and 4he
second woman was reluctat to
testify.
When officers returned with one
fan and witnesses failed to identify
James Aadiso, 37, Negro was
upon motion for a directed verdict
by Defense Attorney Harry Sin
clair, found Coleman innocent.
John E. Southerland, Jr., 27,
was handed a 12-months suspend
ed sentence for molesting a 15
year-old Negro girl who he was
driving home after she had been
acting as a baby sitter for a wom
an in the Riverside apartments.
The Negro girl said she jumped
from Southerland’s moving car.
The sentence was suspended up
on condition that the defendant re
main of good behavior for two
years.
James Addison, 3/, ixegro, was
charged with illegal possession of
non-tax paid liquor which ABC
agents said they seized in a raid
at the man’s home, 320 McRae
street, Dorothy Addison, the man’s
wife.' testified that the liquor be
longed to her.
“Draw a warrant for her ar
rest,” the court ordered the agents.
Then he fined her $50 and gave
her a 12 months suspended sen
tence in jail on condition of good
behavior for two years._
heart that it was her heart. Her
thoughts plunged down a too
familiar way. Bill, at this mo
ment, was probably reading
briefs, or searching out opinions
that had bearing on her father’s
case, and was already grateful to
her. Tonight he would go to his
mother’s. “Diane’s on her way to
Reno to get a divorce.”
She pictured his mother’s shock
ed face, his father’s, for there
could not have been a divorce in
the Arden family before this!
Would Bill say: “Now I am free
to try that case against Diane’s
father. It will help me profession
ally.” Would he say, some day:
“Now I can marry Page. Page
will help me.”
Oh, why, why had she let Rufus
stop her? That, was the simple
way out, not this!
Each night she told herself that
the next day she would go in with
Rufus, go to the station, get on a
train. He had said they were hold
ing her tickets for her. Her re
maining here was as futile as it
was fantastic, and she would'tell
him so. But when he came, as he
did each morning, her decision
would falter. She would find her
self boasting, instead, of conquer
ing the woodstovc. of the art of
chopping wood—“Well, after a
fashion.” Of winning the Duell’s
to neighborliness. “I am to get
milk from them every morning.
Butter and eggs and chickens
when I want them.” Letting it
sound as though she were, perma
nently established in the little
house.
Of hours of intolerable restless
ness and weary brooding, hours
when it seemed as if some flood’s
crest had tossed her on to a
strange and lonely shore, of long
walks up and down the valley and
over the hills, simply to bring her
self to physical exhaustion, she
said nothing.
(To Be Continued)
————mm e —mmmmm—wm
G U R R Jewelers
Wllmlnrton’n Fine Jeweler
26* N. Front 8t. Dial 2-1811
VENETIAN BLINDS
Af.T SIZE BUNDS MADE AND
ltKFINISHKD
STRICKLAND VENETIAN
BLIND WORKS
Phone 6404. Castle Harne Road
\
None M\u-At Any Price! j
NOTICE
DOG OWNER’S
Dog Badges are now due, all dogs must w
badges on collar. Badges $2.00 per annum. Due ft ^
1st, 1947. *
C. R. Morse, Tax Collector
WHITE SIDEWALL TIReT
$11 .95 Size 6.00x16
““—A11 Ta*ps Included
WENBERG BROS.
Your U. S. Royal Tire Distributor *
3rd and Grace Sts. Phone 2-368e
NOTICE
Trucks, Drays and Public Vehicles
New license plates due June 1st, 1947. for
all trucks, drays and public vehicles. Cost
$1.00 per truck per year.
C. R. Morse, Tax Collector
TH1
l / W wide ...
\ X and as Ion* as
IXdesired, in 12'
Mdensioee
VQwH&t20*
FOR FARM AND
INDUSTRY
Matthes Steel Products Corporation
1815 Castle St. Phone 2-14#
NOTICE
The General Assembly of North Carolina has en
acted:—G. S. 105-422 baring tax liens for 1936
and prior years.
That this act shall be in full force and effect
from and after July 1, 1947.
This act provides for the institution of suits prior
to December 31, 1948, so that the city of Wil
mington and New Hanover County can protect
their claims against all parties owing taxes prior
to 1937. All persons owing taxes for the above
years, suit will be brought immediately.
DELINQUENT TAX DEPT.
James H. Sen SI
Announces
His Retirement From Business
As Of June 18ih 1947 Upon Advice Qf Physicians
All persons for whom he is holding papers, legal
documents, accounts receivable and payable are re
quested to communicate with the above at
104 HOPPER AVE.
ALLENDALE, N. J.
Or Telephone Allendale, N. J., I-3399-J
IN BOTTLES AND AT FOUNTAINS {
Pepsi-Cola Company, Long Island Cily, bl.Y,
Franchised Bottler—Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co., of Wilmington,
— - -----1
SOAP BOX DERBY
OFFICIAL
Wheel Assemblies
Built by B. F. Goodrich
Complete Assembly Contains Oniy
• 4 Rubber Tires • 4 Cotter Pins Jw
(Mounted) • 1 12-Foot Steering 9T0H ■ # mV
• 4 Steel Wheels Cable SHI "
• 2 Steel Axles • 1 Instruction Sheet H
• 4 Shear Nuts • 1 Official Rule Book

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