OCR Interpretation


The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, June 22, 1947, SECTION-B, Image 23

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-06-22/ed-1/seq-23/

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' WIS LOVE SET
WON A HUSBAND
AND A MOVIE JOB
By MARK BARRON
AP Newsfeatures
NEW YORK — Marilyn Nash
1)),PS to tell how she not only got
a leading role in the movies but
aiso got * husband merely be
cause she wanted to borrow a ten
nis court,
b!;ss Nash, a honey-face tjlonde,
Charlies Chaplin's leading worn
ar in his new film, “Monsieur
Verdoux,” and she is quietly rest
jj.0 jn New York at the moment
because she is, in her own words,
"expecting.”
"bly film career started wholly
up" ientionallv,” she said. “I was
, pre-medical student in the Uni
yersity of Arizon at Tucson and I
bad done some amateur acting
Wj;h student groups there.
"They always gave me male
r0]es because I was so tall, and
later when I gave a reading for
bt Chaplin I did the role of
K r.s Lear which I had played in
ichooi."
bliss Nash went to Hollywood
or her vacation from college.
"bly friend knew the Chaplins.
io we went over there to borrow
their tennis court one day.” she
said. "I met Mrs. Chaplin (Oona
0 Neill, daughter of playwright
Eugene O'Neill) and she suggest
ad me for the role in ‘Monsieur
Verdoux.” That’s when I read the
part of King Lear for Mr. Chap
lin.
"Mrs. Chaplin sent me to a dra
matic teacher, Nina Moige, who
V.SS a friend of Oona's mother.
With her I studied voice and dic
tion for two years before the pic
ture started.”
This is Miss Nash’s first pic
ture, but she is returning to Hol
lywood for further film roles when
her baby is born. Her husband is
Philip Yordan, author of the stage
hit, "Anna Lucasta.” She met him
o Cnaplin’s tennis court. He
lived next door and also had come
over to borrow the courts.
Dial 2-3311 For Newspaper Service
DRIVE-IN-THEATRE
Midway between Wilmington
and Carolina Bearh
WITHERING
HiGHTS
Merle Oberon and
Geraldine Fitzgerald
Selected Shorts
2 Shows Nightly
Starting 8 & JO
[They’ll Do It Every Time By Jimmy Hatlo
a ~ v sslrr\ i— Q ----—
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CERTAINLY [ COURSE I DON’T
HAS NO V HOW SILLY! IT’S
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TO / WITH ME! JUST A
GEORGE’S ( MINUTE-I’LL CALL
PLAYING \ GEORGE TO Tl
POKER
-SO THE f GO RIGHT AHEAD, IF YOU ^
FELLOWS PREFER THE COMPANY OF
CAN’T \THOSE LOWLIFES TO ME
UNDERSTAND T AND MY POOR, DEAR ^
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INVITATIONS — ( SlDER ME. AFTER ALL,
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^ COPK >»4l. KING FEATURES SYNDICATE. Int.. WORLD RIGHTS RESERVED |
1 lie World Ilf Music
NEW YORK, June 21. (U.RJ —The
Philadelphia Orchestra has com
pleted the major details of its 48th
season storting next Sept. 26. •
There will be the usual subscript-1
ion series of 28 Friday afternoons
and Saturday evenings, five youth
concerts anj five children's con-,
certs.
Eugene Ormandy will conduct
most of the season but will be re
lieved from time to time by his j
associate, Alexander Hilsberg, and
by four grest conductors — Bruno j
Walter, Pierre Monteux. George
Szell and Dimitri Mitropoulos.
Soloists will include Rudolf Ser
kin, Zino Francescatti, Rudolf Fir
kusny, Elrem Zimbalist, Alex
ander Brailowsky, William Prim
rose, Jacques Thibaud. Luboshutz
and Netr.enoff, Angel Reyes,
Carlos Salzcdo and Nicholas
Medtner.
Nicolai Berezovvsky has been
commissioned by the League of
Composers to write a concerto for
orchestra an^ theremin, the elec
trical instrument. It will be played
at the league’s 25th anniversary
celebration? next season, by Lucy
Bigelow Rosen, outstanding per
former on the instrument.
The theremin is a vertical pipe
resembling somewhat a radio an
tenna. which emanates electrical
impulses. Volume and pitch are
controlled by the player by man
ipulating hands and fingers in
mid-air, the pipe never being
touched.
Virginia MacWatters, who has
One OF THE SCREEN’S
ALL-TIME GREATS
RETURNS TO THRILL
YOU AGAIN...AND AGAIN!
I •' —--’
j.. aia, DAY the A A D ye
oeen singing at Covent Garden in
London, fias been signed for the
Viennese night at the. Hollywood
Bowl July 19, when she and John
Carter, tenor of the Metropolitan
Opera, will appear under the J
baton of Robert Stoiz, Because of
a contract with the Glyndebourne
Opera at the International Festir
val of Music and Drama in Edin
burgh, where she will appear as
Susanna in “The Marriage of
Eigaro'’ from July 25 through
Sept. 13. the young soprano will
lly to the United States and return
to England not later than July 23
to ful-fill her two-hemisphere en
gagements.
Nadine Conner, soprano, inter
rupted a summer vacation at her
home in Compton, Calif., to f 1 y
east to sing the role of Gretel in
Humperdincks “Hansel and Gre- j
tel,” which Columbia Records re
corded in its entirety from the
state of the Metropolitan Opera
House. Mezzosoprano Rise Stevens
sings Hansel in the recording.
George Walker, 24 - year - old
pianist ol Washington, D. C., will
represent the cultural division of
the National Negro Congress at
the International Youth Festival
this summer in Prague. Walker is
a graduate of the Curtis Institute.
He will enter both the piano and
composition competitions at
Prague.
The Symphony Orchestra of
Mexico, under the direction of
Carlos Chavez, has opened its 1947
season at the Palace of Fine Arts,
Mexico City. Seventeen pairs of
concerts are scheduled on con
secutive Fridays and Sundays un
til Oct. 5. after .which the
orchestra will again make a tour
of principal cities of Mexico. Nine
of the concerts this season will be
led by Chavez and the remainder
by Aaron Copland, Alfred Wallen
stein, Jose Pablo Moncayo,
Manuel Ponce and Luis Sandi.
The three winners of the Chi
cago Music News prize in composi
tion were announced jointly by
the Chicago Music News and F.
Charles Adler, conductor of the
Saratoga Spa Music Festival,
where the winning scores will be
performed in September. The win
ners are Will Jay Bottje, native
of Grand Rapids, Mich.; Ashley
Vernon of New York and Mark ;
Lawner of Brooklyn.
Erica Marini, violinist, who has
just completed a concert tour of
the United States and Canada, has
left for Europe to appear at the
opening of the Lucerne Festival in
Switzerland on Aug. 9, when she
will play the Tschatkowsky Con
certo.
The Heckscher Foundation f o r
children nas donated $2,000 to the
Juilliard School of Music for
scholarships in the preparatory
department. Two or more scholar
ship awards will be made over a
period of two years. The founda
tion has requested that they be
made without discrimination as to
race, creed or color.
You know what a chore it Is to
keep the piano keys clean. A bit
of cream wax does wonders in
making them smooth and free
from dust and dirt.
See Your International Industrial Power”
Distributor When You Need.
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MATERIAL HANDLING EQUIPMENT
Sales
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Parts
Supplies
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WILMINGTON
5 Miles West
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Phone 2-2173
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2 Miles South Route 21
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MONDAY
6:30—News Summary
6:33—Sunup Hoedown
7; 00—N e ws—Local
7:05-i-Eye Opener
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12:15—Bobby Norris and The Singing
Strings
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3:00—Erskine Johnson
3:15—Johnson Family
3:'0—Two Ton Baker
3:45—Quaker City Serenade
4:00—Record Review
Pity The Poor Customer,
Expert Tells Retailer
WEST CHESTER, Pa. (U.R) —
Charles S. Wyand. an authority on
retail selling methods, says there
are three things wront with retail
business. They are:
More customers suffer from an
inferiority complex.
Most clerks are indifferent, con-"
descending and frequently down
right insulting.
Most employers who hire the
clerks are self-satisfied and reluc
tant to make progressive changes.
Wyand, who is assistant to the
president of Pennsylvania State
College, told a West Chester Board
of Trade meetings that trades peo
ple should remember that the av
er. ge customer is ‘‘a fairly in
articulate person, with frustrations
and aspirations and deepae-sied
inferiority feelings, who is trying
to buy self-esteem along with his
other purchases."
Othman Wants To Know Who !
Is Booing Who Over Bill
By FREDERICK C. OTHMAN
United Press Staff Correspondent
WASHINGTON, June 21 —(U.R)—
What I -want to know is, who's
booing who?
There can be no doubt that
President Truman used some 5,
000 well-chosen words to boo Con
gress for its labor bill. Some of
these words were so fancy that
George Maurer, the ordinarily im
perturbable house 'reading clerk,
stumbled over a number of them.
Nor is there much argument
about the booing by the union cav
alcades, which converged upon
Washington with signs chglked on
the door3 of their sedans: ‘‘kill
the slave labor bill.” That's
known as booing in print.
The urnon leaders parked their
motorcars outisde and jam-packed
the galleries of the houre. Four
hundred and fourteen congress
men—moie than I ever saw be
fore in their sanctum at one time
—found seats.
And there was speaker Joe Mar
tin. a prudent man, armed for
trouble. One gavel wasn’t enough.
He had two big wallopers. I guess
maybe he was a little excited over
the importance of the occasion,
because he immediately pulley a
blooper.
Congress, as you know, isn t
supposed to know what’s in a
Presidential message until it is
actually read. A number of law
makers wanted to sound off; Mar
tin squelched ’em.
“I think the speeches might
well be deferred until action on
the veto,'- he said.
Haw-haw-haw. went the law
makers; the speaker flushed over
letting the veto out of the basket,
while the unionists sat there, puz
zled over the merriment. Clerk
Maurer oYgan to read the Presi
dent’s message. He plowed
i through it for 45 minutes, with
never a stop for breath, or a drink
of water.
This reading took so long that
a couple of Democrats, one from
Texas and the other from Indiana,
broke out a sack of peanuts. Made
a fellow hungry, looking at ’em.
Didn’t do the reading clerk any
good, either, because it is diffi
cult to face an audineee while it
eats.
When Maurer'd read the final
wor.d, a few of the democrats
clapped their hands. One tried a
tentative cheer. And then, from
the floor, rose a boo. The hand
clappers nied to drown it out. Thf
boos grew louder, and Speaker
Martin whacked his gavels until
they sounded like a cannonade.
That brought silence.
Then the speaker did a peculiar
thing. He bawled out the visitors
in the galleries. 1 swear they
hadn’t uttered a peep, but Martirf
said if they made any more noise
ne u eject em.
A Democrat from Michigan, j
name of John Lesinski, said he
didn't warn to vote on over-riding
the veto until ne d had a chance
to do a little arguing. The depub
licans wove crying, “vote, vote,
vote.” When nobody agreed with
Lesinski, he suggested — despite
the packed house—that no quorum
was present.
The Speaker sighed. He went
through the motions of counting
the customers. He said a quorum
was on hand. Came then the his
tory-making vote about wnich you
have read. The house over-rode
the president almost foui to one;
moie o! his own Democrats voted
aga.nst him than for him This, I
understand, is known as booing by
ballot.
Now it's un to the Senate and I
can hardly wait; I want to know
who’s boo wins the argument.
TODAY - MON.
A HUNDRED Dk^r^RATE
MEN AND A GIRL!
Defying The Brutal Code Of The Sea
On A Death-StalkedVoyage That Made
Adventure History! __ I
Alan
LADD •
William
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Barry a
DONLEVYjl
Brian
I Fitzgerald
gapBjg
The Family
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“THE MOVIE OF THE YEAR" —Esquire Magazine
I "The Pick of the Pictures
—Jimmy Fidler
SEE • greet
book live on
tho screen!
AN
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iCUUDE JARMAN, JR. is “JOOr
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Of Sonsr And Action!
"WILD
WEST"
IN NATURAL COLOR
with
EDDIE DEAN
SOUTH’S BEAUTIES
TO ATI ND FEST
Governor Cherry To Invite
Other States To
Send Girls
Special to the Star-News
WILSON. June 21—Governor R.
Gregg Cherry will send invitations
‘o governors of Virginia, Tennes
see. Kentucky. South Carolina,
Georgia and Florida, asking those
governors to appoint a young lady
from their respective states to
represent their state in the court
of honor of the queen at the sixth
annual North Carolina Tobacco
Exposition and Festival to be held
here August 14 and 15, it was an
nounced today.
These young ladies will be en
tertained by the festival while in
Wilson and will ride in the parade,
appear at the contest for queen
and be entertained in a round of
parties ana events while here.
The voting ladies will also he
special guests of the festival at
the annual Coronation ball on tha
night of August 15 when Tex
Beneke and the Glenn Miller* or
chestra will play for the event.
They will take part in the grand
march
Foreign Service
Makes Assignments
AF SPECIAL WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON, June 21— <*! —
New foreign service assignments
announced by the State Depart
ment yesterday include:
William B. Cobb, Jr.. 611 East
Walnut stret. Goldsboro, third
secretary and vice consul at Ha
vana-.
Stuart Blow. Washington. N. C.,
assigned to Calcutta. India, ai
vice consul.
Thomas S. Campen. Goldsboro,
acting commercial attache at
Lima. Peru, designated commer
cial attache.
Remember to wax your refrig
erator and. for that matter, all
kitchen equipment at least twice
a year to preserve the finish and
help prevent discoloration.
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