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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, July 02, 1947, Image 13

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Spinners Up Lead To Five Games
i¥ith 7-5 Win In 10th Over Leafs
bulla leads
YANK ADVANCE
BY GLENN WILLIAMS
p iYLAKE, England, July 1.—(fP)
__ Curly-haired Johnny Bulla, an
^ >na golfer who pilots an air
for a living, shot a scorching
f ioday and led an unbroken con
tv tent of five Americans into the
f va’s of the British Open and the
rr0, n being given up by Sam
gnead.
yiulia’s score, which missed the
jj., -old record of the Arrowe Park
ro irse by a single stroke, gave
;.; T) a two-day card of 142 and
tY d place in the field of 100 who
+o ■ orrow shoot the first 18 holes
0i he tournament proper over the
jf lake layout.
v ark Stranahan, temperamen
tpt amateur from Toledo, Ohio,
ba.ged in with a 71 over Hoylake
for ;44 and fifth place; other
A- tricans scores were Vic Ghezzi
of Kansas City, Kas., with 79-72—
if.- Robert. Sheeny, Jr., of Cali
fornia and London, with 70-79—
j4fl; and Staff Sgt. Charles Jen
n,nY of Medford, N. J., and the
f 3- Airforce, whose aggregate
oY 149 was made up of rounds of
76-73.
Norman Van Nida, tiny Austra
lian led the way after tacking a
6tj -o his first round 70 for a 139
•ha was three strokes bttter than
B ia's total and two blows less
than that registered by Art Lees,
lime known British pro. Bert
Gadd. an Englishman who holds
the French Open title and who set
the Arrowe Park course record of
6fi yesterday, zoomed to 77 today
•Bi: ‘ his 143 left him in a fifth tie
vv;• Dai Rees, Stubby Welshman
yho had 71-72 143.
Henry Cotton, British pro who
ended iO years of U. S. domina
tion in this meet in 1934, came in
*i‘h 74-72—146 that assured him
of a place in the championship
field and furthered his avowed in
tentions of regaining the trophy.
INDIANS SPANK
ST. LOUIS, 9-3
ST- LOUIS, July 1. — (ff>— A
five-run seventh inning with home
runs by Hank Edwards and Ken
Keltner sent the Cleveland Indians
on to a 9 to 3 victory over the St.
Louis Browns tonight.
Jeff Heath and Vern Stephens hit
circuit blows for the Brownies in
the contest which saw eight two
base hits for both clubs.
CLEVELAND AB R H O A
Metkovich, cf - 5 2 2 5 0
Mitchell, If - 5 2 2 0 0
Edwards, rf - 5 13 2 0
Boudreau, ss - 4 12 10
Conway, ss - 1 0 0 0 0
Robinson, lb - 5 0 0 6 0
Gordon, 2b - 2 10 3 3
Keltner, 3b - 4 12 10
Hagan, c --- — S 1 1 9 0
Feller, p _ 1 0 0 0 0
Gromek. p - 3 0 0 0 2
TOTALS _ 38 9 12 27 5
ST. LOUIS AB R H O A
Dil linger, 3b - 4 0 13 0
Coleman, rf - 4 0 10 0
Stephens, ss —!-— 4 12 12
Heath, If _ 4 114 0
Lehner, cf - 4 12 3 0
Judnich. lb - 4 0 17 0
Hitchcock, 2b _ 4 0 0 5 3
Early, c _ 2 0 0 4 0
Kinder, p _- 2 0 0 0 3
Schultz, z _ 1 0 0 0 0
Fannin, p__- 0 0 #0 0 U
Zarilla. zz _ 1 0 0 0 0
TOTALS __ 34 3 8 27 8
z—Popped out for Kinder in 7th,
zz—Popped out for Fannin in 9th.
CLEVELAND 110 020 500—9
ST. LOUIS . 010 001 010—3
Errors—None. Runs batted in—Boud
reau. Kinder, Edwards 4, Heath, Kell
ner 2. Stephens. Two base hits—Metko
vich Boudreau 2, Dillinger, Stephens,
E vards, Keltner, Lehner. Home runs—
Heath. Edwards, Keltner, Stephens.
S- base—Dillinger. Double plays —
Gordon and Boudreau: Stephens, Hitch
cock and Judnich. Left on bases —
Cleveland 5, St. Louis 7. Bases on balls—
Gromek 3, Kinder 3. Strikeouts—Feller
t Gromek 5. Kinder 4. Hits off Feller
•' 11-3 innings, off Gromek 5 in 7
2-3; off Kinder 1 in 7; off Fannin 1 in
2 Winning pitcher—Gromek. Losing
pitcher—Kinder, mpires — McKinley,
Summers, Rue and Paparella. Time 2:14
Attendance 10,461.
WILLIAMS WIELDS ROD
ON FISH TRIP, LUCKY
BANGOR, Me., July 1. —(JPf—
Ted Williams wielded a fishing rod
Instead cf a bat today deep in the
"'ild and lonely Allagash country of
northern Maine.
What luck he had was his own
secret, pending his scheduled re
turn here tonight.
The Boston Red Sox slugger was
C' i;dent enough when he took off
fr,r Ross Lake earlier in the day.
"I don't know anything about my
ba'ting but I’m a great fisher
T he declared.
Lumberton Batters Clinton, 17 To 5;
Twins Top Warsaw, 5 To 3;
Cubs Homer Heavily
Scoring two runs in t he tenth inning, the Sanford
Spinners lengthened their first place leadership margin to
five full games over the Wilmington Pirates last night by
whipping Selma-Smithfield, 7-5. Other Tobacco State league
results were Warsaw 2, Dunn-Erwin 5, Lumberton 17, Clin
ton 4, and Red Springs 10, Wil
mington 2.
The Sanford fracas was nip-and
tuck most of the way with both
teams holding the lead at one
time or the other. Then with the
count standing, 5-5, going into
the tenth Tanford scored two fast
runs, and held the Selma-Smith
field big guns silent in their return
at hat. Narron, ex-St. Louis Card
inal catcher, led the Leafs with
the war clubs with two for four,
including a triple. Wilson with
two doubles and a single topped
Sanford’s batting parade.
Although Stephens hit a home
run for Warsaw, the Red Sox lost
5-2 to Dunn-Erwin. The Twins were
practically impregnable behind
Komar’s brilliant seven-hit pitch
ing and five strikeout record.
Jackson led the Dunn-Erwin ball
club to victory with three for four.
Three Dunn-Erwin runs in the
seventh inning clinched the en
counter. Johnson pitched a nice
game for the losers, giving up
seven hits and whiffing nine, but
was hampered by occasional wild
ness that put six Twin men on
first.
Lumberton gained a full game
on the Wilmington Pirates at Clin
ton, downing the Blues, 17-4. The
win placed the Cubs exactly four
and one-half games back of the
Pirates and three and one-half
ahead of Warsaw. Van Nordheim
took the mound for Lumberton
and delivered a 11-hit twirling job,
fanning five, and walking four,
Kukulka with three singles in four
batted in six runs between them
selves, enough to win the game.
Dixon and Marx aided the Lum
berton cause with home runs. They
tries led Clinton’s batters. Crum
mie of Lumberton looked good
with the stick by slapping four
fcr six.
FORBES CHIEF SETS
GOSHEN TRACK MARK
GOSHEN, N. Y., July 1. —(tfV
Forbes Chief, three-year-old pacer
of the Newport stock farm stables,
today established a course record
over Goshen’s historic track in win
ning the $4,000 pace for three-year
olds which topped the card.
The brown colt by Chief Abbe
dale toured the two lap oval in
2:03 1-5, lopping four-tenths of a
second off the. record set by the
widower on July 14, 1938.
Forbes Chief won the race in
straight sets and by his victory,
boomed his s^ock in the Little
Brown Jug, top stake of the sea
son for three-year-old pacers.
Forbes Chief, and Del Cameron
who drove him stole the show in
the second heat. In this tour he
seemingly was hopelessly boxed on
the rail with less than a sixteenth
of a mile to go — but somehow or
other he got through on the rail
and in a whipping finish with Jake
Mahoney, just managed to get up
| in time to win.
AT CLINTON
LUMBER-TON AB R H O A E
Crummie, ss - 6 3 4 2 5 1
Stanley, 3b - 5 2 2 0 3 0
Marx, lb - 5 2 2 10 0 1
Jamin, If —-- 5 2 2 1 0 0
Pearsal}, cf - 5 2 1 2 0 0
Cabaniss, 2b - 5 0 0 3 0 0
Dixon, rf - 6 2 3 4 0 0
Knisely, c - 5 1 2 5 0 0
Van Nordheim, p- 6 3 3 0 0 0
TOTALS _48 17 19 27 8 2
CLINTON AB R H O A E
Evans, ss _ 5 0 0 4 3 3
Marsh, 2b - 5 0 1 0 3 3
Askew, rf - 5 1 2 2 0 0
Vorrell, If - 3 2 1 0 0 0
Kukulka, 3b - 4 1 3 2 2 0
Mungo, lb - 5 0 1 10 0 0
McLain, cf_ 5 0 1 2 0 0
Sanders, c - 1 0 0 4 1 0
Ward, c _ 3 0 1 4 0 0
Vaughn, p- 1 0 0 0 1 0
Bradley, p - 2 0 10 10
Wright, z - 0 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS _ 39 4 11 27 11 4
z—Batted for Sanders in 8th. __
I LUMBERTON 007 110 512—17
CLNTON 020 010 100— 4
Runs batted in — Mungo, Stanley,
Jamin 3, Pearsall, Cabaniss, Dixon 3,
Van Nordheim 2, Marx 4, Kukulka.
Two base hits—Crummie, Dixon, Jamin,
Marx. Three base hits—Askew. Home
runs — Dixon, Marx. Stolen bases —
Cabaniss, Jamin. Double plays — Marx
(unassisted). Left on bases—Lumberton
14, Clinton 12. Bases on balls—off:
Vaughn 1, Bradley 5, Van Nordheim 4.
Struck out by—Vaughn 3, Bradley 5,
Van Nordheim 5. Hits off: Vaughn 8
in 4 innings; Bradley 11 in 7. Losing
pitcher—Vaughn. Umpires — Ouzts and
Veasey. Time of game *:S0.
AT SM1THFIELD
SANFORD AB R H O A E
Guinn, 2b _ 4 10 3 6 0
Nessing, 3b _ 5 2 2 2 2 1
Wilson, cf _ 5 2 3 3 0 0
Nesselrode, rf _ 3 11110
Shoffner, lb _ 4 0 1 8 % 0
Watson, If _ 4 0 1 2 0 0
Hedrick, c _ 3 0 0 7 10
Tosazec, ss _ 2 0 0 1 0 1
Keane, ss _ 2 0 1 2 0 1
Bortz, p _ 2 10 110
Craig, p - 1 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS - 35 7 0 30 13 3
SELMA-SMITHFIELD AB R H O A E
Howard, ss _ 4 2 1 3 7 1
Carroll, If _ 4 2 13 10
Bare, 3b_5 0 113 0
Narron, c _-_ 4 0 2 0 2 0
Mason, z _ 0 0 0 0 0 0
Eames, c_ 0 0 0 0 1 0
Woodard, rf_ 5 0 0 8 0 0
Bernstein, cf _ 3 0 1 3 0 1
Balia, 2b _ 5 0 0 6 3 1
Oehler, lb _ 5 0 1 10 0 0
Gibson, p _ 4 110 11
Ososski, p _ 0 0 0 0 0 0
Eonta, zz _ 1 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS _ 40 5 8 30 17 4
z—Ran for Narron in 9th.
zz—Batted for Ososski in 10th.
SANFORD 001 020 020 2—7
SELMA-SMITHFIELD 100 000 301 0—5
Runs batted in—Nessing, Wilson, Nes
selrode, Shoffner 2, Hedrick, Narron 2.
Two base hits—Wilson 2, Keane, Shoff
ner. Three base hits—Narron. Stolen
bases—Carroll 2, Bernstein. Sacrifices—
Carroll. Double plays—Balia, Howard
end Oehler. Howard and Uhls. Left on
bases—Sanford 8; Selma-Smithfield 7.
Bases on balls—off: Bortz 3, Craig 2,
Gibson 6, Ososski 1. Struck out, by —
Bortz 6, Ososski 1. Hits off: Bortz 7 in
7 innings; £raig 1 in 3; Gibson 9 in 9
1-3; Ososski 0 in 2-3. Wild pitches —
Gibson. Winning pitcher—Craig. Losing
pitcher — Gibson. Umpires—Ruch and
Davidzuk. Time of game 2:40.
’ AT DUNN
WARSAW AB R B O A E
Lail, cf _ 3 0 1 0 0 0
Jordan, ss _ 4 0 0 1 2 0
Jones, 3b _ 4 0 1 Q 0 0
Milner, lb _ 4 0 0 8 0 0
Bohannon, If _ 4 0 0 0 0 0
Stephens, rf _ 4 1 2 3 0 0
McCarty, 2b _ 4 1112 1
Rowland, c _ 3 0 1 10 1 0
Johnson, p _ 3 0 115 1
TOTALS _83 2 7 24 10 2
DUNN-ERWIN AB R H O A E
Jackson, rf_ 4 2 3 2 0 0
Collins, ss _'_ 3 2 114 0
McQuillen, cf_ 3 0 1 4 0 0
Denning, If _ 3 0 1 2 0 0
Miller, 3b _ 4 0 0 0 0 0
Leach, lb _ 3 0 1 9 0 0
Hayward, c _ 8 0 0 7 0 0
Bullock, 2b _ 3 0 0 2 3 0
Komar, p_ 3 1 0 0 4 0
TOTALS ___ 29 5 7 27 11 0
WARSAW 000 010 001—2
DUNN-ERWIN 100 001 30x—5
Runs batted in—McQuillen 2, Roland,
Miller. Denning, Stephens. Two base
hits—McQuillen, Stephens. Three base
hits—Rowland, Jonea. Home runs —
Stephens 1. Stolen bases—Jackson 2,
Denning. Sacrifices—Hayward. Double
plays—Johnson, Rowland and Milner;
McCarty, Jordan and Milner. Left on
bases—Dunn-Erwin 7; Warsaw 5. Bases
on balls—off: Johnson 6, Komar 1.
Struck out by—Johnson 9, Komar 5.
Umpires—Mitchell and Reveille. Time of
game 2:00.
GIANTS CRUSH
BOSTON, 15-3
NEW YORK, July 1. — (fP) —
Blasting five homers, the New
York Giants crushed the National
League’s pace-setting Boston
Braves, 15-3 tonight in a game that
was halted at the end of seven
innings because of rain.
Bob Thomson, Willard Marshall,
Buddy Kerr, Walker Cooper and
Johnny Mize homered for the
Giants while Tommy Holmes hit
two circuit drives for the Braves.
Mize’s four-bagger was his 21st of
the season, top output in the ma
jors.
BOSTON AB R H O A
Holmes, rf _ 4 2 3 2 0
M. McCormick, cf - 3 0 0 2 1
Rowell, If --- 3 0 12 0
Elliott, 3b _ 2 0 0 0 1
Torgeson, lb _ z 0 1 8 0
Masi, c _ 3 0 0 5 1
Ryan, 2b _ 2 0 0 1 2
Fernande , ss - 1 0 0 0 0
Culler, ss - 2 0 0 0 1
Johnson, p - 0 0 0 0 1
Litwhiler, x - 1 C 0 0 0
Karl, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
Sain, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
Shoun, p - 11111
Sisti, ss-2b _x- 2 0 0 0 2
TOTALS _ 26 3 6 21 10
x—Popped out for Johnson in 7th.
NEW YORK AB R H O A
Rigney, 2b _ 5 3 4 2 2
Kerr, ss _ 5 12 2 1
Thomson, cf - 5 3 3 4 0
Mize, lb - 4 2 2 2 0
Marshall, rf —-3 2 12 0
W. Cooper, c _ 4 2 2 6 0
Gordon, If - 3 10 0 0
Lohrke, 3 b - 3 113 0
Jansen, p _ 3 0 10 0
TOTALS __ 35 15 16 21 3
BOSTON 102 000 0— 3
NEW YORK 822 003 0—15
(Called end seventh).
Error—Elliott. Runs batted in—Holmes
3, Thomson 2, Marshall 2, Lohrke, Rig
ney 2, Kerr 3. W. Cooper 2, Mize 2,
Jansen. Two base hits—Rigney, Torge
son, Rowell. Three base hits—Holmes,
Thomson. Home runs—Holmes 2, Thom
son, Marshall, W. Cooper, Kerr, Mize.
Sacrifice—Jansen. Double play—Rigney,
Kerr and Mize. Left on bases—Boston 4;
New York 4. Bases on balls—Sain 2,
Jansen 2, Johnson 2. Strikeouts—Jan
sen 4, Shcun 1, Johnson 1. Karl 1.
Hits—Sain 5 in 1-3 inning; Shoun 7 in
3 2-3; Johnson 3 in 2; Karl 1 in 1.
Losing pitcher—Sain. Umpires—Mager
kurth, Henline, Ballanfant and Stewart.
Time 1:39. Attendance 36,923 paid.
CHICAGO RELEASES
VETERAN BILL LEE
CHICAGO, July 1.—(A*)—Bill Lee,
star of the Chicago Cubs’ pitching
corps from 1934 through 1942 when
he won 136 games and lost 114,
today was tentatively optioned by
the club to Tulsa of the Texas
League.
The Cubs, however, gave Lee
permission to make h deal for
himself with any other major
league club.
In August, 1943, the Cubs traded
Lee to the Phillies for catcher
Mickey Livingston. The Phils in
turn sold him on waivers to the
Eoston Braves July 14, 1945. The
Braves cut him loose last spring
although he won 10 and lost 9
for them last season.
Lee, who signed on with the
cubs as a free agent, had one
defeat and no victories for the
club this season.
Believe It or Not! by RiPiey I
CAVILLI of Bologna,Way
HAS REVERSED EMOTIONS/
HE CRIES WHEN HE IS HAPPY
ANP LAUGHS WHEN HE IS SAP /
Melbourne, Australia -r " "
SCULPTRESS OLA COHN HAS CARVED A bOO-YEAR OLD BLUE GUM INTO
A FAIRY TREE FOR CHILDREN -ON IT APPEARS KOOKABURRAS
WOMBATS - KANGAROOS ' KOALAS AND OTHER CREATURES ©^AUSTRALIA
Oft I TIT. Kirtj Fniui*> S|aJniic. VftM iiwtwI
SMILIN’ JACK ^- FEE LIN’ MIGHTY LOW
HATE TO LET.
H|M y^j m
! vCy look. awful^W that sick.— I
j '■ CK, OFFICER f K\ FEEL LINE A HEEL
i OTP BETTER FOR BEING SUCH
] *sk_th'pii^t^^P^k^ A SISSY/
T-'T/NTO WCONTROLS
JAN WEDGE NINI IN j?
^BETWEEN W SEATS §
•'AN'CAUSE TH'.PLANE '
\TO CRASH BEFORE THU
■ */ p/lot could get %
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r mister COP--YOURE LOOKIN' LOTS
k WORSE — you V BETTER GET
WHOOPEE CUP BEFOREI^S
AHBIE an’ SLATS~ ” ANOTHER DATE By Raeburn Van Buren
r-- . ■ »y wmiTumiGml Fsure' rrwoulphave Wioo HI frM sorryipisappointepTi won't'
iJON'T 60 AWAY, Va PISTOL') IT ISN T REAL. Tv-wu THOUGHT u&ng ft LOUP NOtSEf TLIKE YOU, YOU. WAIT FOR ME HERE^/POINT IT
C^RliE'PONT ACT IT'S ONLY S[ VOU fAHfi} KEE-RACKY* J CHARLIE/ I'M AGAIN - TOMORROW ^AT ANYONE*
AN ANGRY umeTj^r- . TOV/ jC^rroiT.^ME' BUTT^T REAL?VcrJSy ABOUT NIGHT. I'LL BRING. Jl PONT WANT
I BROUGHT YOU / hm*.eryJ *JNTEP IT- $s a rake* you^you; YOU PONT you a real one^/td hurt any
^OMSTHING ELSE-^yf i ^f^AU^WHAT PWT UKE ME fUHPBSTANP BECAUSE BUT YOU MUST ONEflJUST
ry ,y V */sx V00 Scuup have lire you you're like a little promise never )/ wanta real
I 57^4 . 4m O^mS^ENroiF SWPVir'A WY-BUTICANT TO POINT IT AT /i ©NE. I'LL WAIT
• If . :v-7J ^4^-BaaHELPMY- ^ANYONE YOU^
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Tm. U. S. M. Of—All >i^‘tnt«n>«j
JANE ARDEN— _
/1 MADE
WT. H* Rqwtf ...\ I A BAD
:an't\ mistake
' *• S WE BE \ AND I'M
( REASONABLE \WILLING
l ABOUT THIS ?/TO PAY
ULTIMATUM
/ ' 1 ri1 ■ ■" ■ . -- - - _
WU UFFEft
$15,000— I
ASK.
$75,000
^ AX SPLIT THE
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$45,000—
. TAKE IT
OR LEAVE
rr/
' I THOUGHT \
VOU WERE
GOING TO
BE REASONABLE
IP I HAVE TO SUE Y HE'LL. PAY
IU. ASK $100,COO- IT— V
YOU HAVE JUST ONE WATCH.V-.
MINUTE TO MAKE /-,
UP YOUR. MIND/ / if f HAS NO
>—- » l^OOtCE/
BOOTS AND HEK BUDDIES — GOODOLD CLARA
*5 HIPPO'S t. 1 COD\_D DO f Af$D A POT Ov fiVUt M\SWT 1 f AUT VT WOULDWT At Uft\c THtRt' \iOlAAT A tpiimdu nc~\
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£30 EUSTER VCALLIKAK 1/ THAT'S NOT
S? is THE SIFTED WRITER V IMPORTANT, BDSTERi
OF SINGING COMMERCIALS! | BUT IT‘5 INAWE
P^ _ ENOUGH TO DELIGHT
MR. RRlNGLEiI'M y
NMBEBV LWING OUST RIGHT, rc*N ^
I MMCE UP FOR NM PfcRT IN FORCING M
iM^^SSak 'W's twwle on the r^im
tggL
THE TRAIL GROWS WARM
SURE, I REMEMBER.
THE FINING ROMMS... 1
DID & SWELL CATCH HCT 1
ON HIGH TR&PS. THEN
WERE WITH S5UO BROS. /
V L&-ST TIME X SEEM A
1%, ’EM NEPERS AGO.'
:-<W
ft] SEtklcWNS FOR.
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GASOLINE ALLEY- TWO SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT
__ i
W IN THE *TORE HE* M f WHAT HE* LEARNING H ON THING* LIKE THE RE? CRO** HE PlPNT TELL ■
W\ JU*T <5AW PAN 4REE2'/Tit% Tno RAD up\ I GETTING A WORKING 1 I ABOUT *UPPLY ANP M ANP CANCER PRIVE*, HE* GETTING ME. I’LL PROP ■
I TOO BADufranaJim \ dnT meLv 1 KNOWLEPGE OF HUMAN I I PEMANP, BUYING ANP M PRACTICAL FINANCE ANP APPLIEP IN ANP TAU<
j^O COLLEGE HE P^Nt^BCTY^CAN^ ^*ELLING, WE* HIM^ CMC*. PAN I* GET TNG AHEAP. JGaJJO HIMAGAIN^/T
UR. BOBBS
AH/ I'VE SOT... SRAB HER / SHE'S A THIEF! I STOP HER (PUFFJ...SHE'S A (PUFF; THIEF....S*STOP...HER!l
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THE GUMPS _ _MEMORY CHIMES IN
rr'S NOT ONLY IN YOUR IF ONLY I COULD \
T yB house, UNCLE WONDERFUL. think OF SOME FORMULA... >
ARGUE ARGUE ARGUE.1 1 THAT'S 1 ■ THE PAPERS ARE FULL FORMULA? FORMULA! J
THATS'ALL THEY DO ATI PROBABLY ^ OF STORIES ABOUT BY GOLLY/ A DISTANT S
OUR HOUSE... AND / JUST WHAT PEOPLE YAPPING AT BELL IS RINGING IN /
BOTH CHLOE AND /THEY ARE... EACH OTHER. MY NOODLE//
TRIXIE THINK \ SOUND... GOOD WILL*THAT'S
(.THEIR ARGUMENTS ) NOTHING BUT WHAT THIS OLD
ARE SOUND... Jk SOUND.. WORLD NEEDS...
ORPHAN ANNIE- BIG FROG
¥ BUT UNCLE TIL HAS X MANAGER* MANAGER OF ^
I DONE MIGHTY WELL TO J ONE .CLERK WHO WORKS ,
1 WORK UP TO MANAGER j FIVE DAYS A WEa<-EXXPr
I OF THE STORE"-! FOR HOLIDAYS AND
^TILBURY IS THERE #
EARLY AND LATE ^ WELL, I "MAONE H
DAYS A WEEK AND / HE FEELS H§
A FEW HOURS ON RESPONSIBLE-" KM
Sunday; too
\ OH. SURE"' AND HE'S NATURALLY \
PROUD THAT HE’S GONE UP SO FAR~>
HE DOESN'T MIND HARO WORK "-IT’S
SURPRISING. ANNIE. HOW MANY PEOPLE
DON’T MIND HARD WORK-IN THESE C¥MS,~J
\~IC~ HAROLD
'Jr GRAY*
M
i
OUT OUR WAY By J. R. WILLIAMS
/ WHAT’S TH’
MATTER WITH
THOSE HORSES?
HAVEM’T THEY
BEEM BROKE
YET?
THE BOO-S'E MEN( ^raSAgMSk.* **
7-f «o— wet. —. t. m. wo. * t.m. ■ £
^ND /•
\ THE C0V4 Son's
- DtD^T HANS
r TO *JMT FOR
GREEN LIGHTS=
- —:-«r*

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