OCR Interpretation


The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, July 28, 1947, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-07-28/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

Southeastern Searchlight
• • •
News Of Interest In All Neighboring
Counties Told Briefly
ATOMIC TALK
CLINTON'—Col. W. T. Fitts,
Jr., Senior Ground Instruc
tor ol the North Carolina Na
tional Guard, is scheduled to
present an address on Atomic
Energy Thursday, July 31, at
7:30 o’clock at the Sampson
county court house. He will ap
pear under the sponsorship
of the Clinton Rotary club and
the public is invited to attend.
BANK WORK BEGINS
FAIRMONT — Construction
was started on the new $50,
000 Waccamaw Bank and Trust
company building here, ac
cording to VV. B, Lennon,
vice-president. The bank per
sonnel plans to move into the
j?ew quarters about Jan. 1,
1948.
LEAGUE MEETING
DUBLIN—The Bladen county
unit of the Allied Church
League will meet at Bethel
Baptist church, near Dublin,
Monday night at 8 o’clock. The
Rev. S. A. Rhyne, of Lumber
ton, will address the audience.
STREET SIGNS
ELISABETHTOWN — The
Elizabethtown Junior Cham
ber of Commerce has voted
to erect street signs here. The
Jaycees will bear the expense
of painting the lettering. The
posts were donated by the
Greene Brothers Lumber com
pany.
CIVIC CONGRESS.
WHITEVILLE—The White
ville Congress of Civic clubs
will meet Monday night, July
28 at 8:15 o’clock in the Arm
ory club rooms to discuss nd
organize plans for the Com
munity Chest.
PATROLMAN TO RESIGN
WHITEVILLE—State High
way Patrolman W. W. Shef
field has announced he will
resign from the patrol on
August 1. He will join the
Whiteville Coca-Cola company.
Patrolman Sheffield joined the
force in June 1939 and has
been stationed here for the
past 18 months.
GUARD UNIT HEAD
TABOR CITY — John W.
Barlow, executive secretary of
the Tabor City Merchants As
sociation, • has been appoint
ed as a captain and command
ing officer of Company K, 119th
Infantry, the National Guard
Unit to be formed here.
MARKET TO CLOSE
CLINTON—The Clinton Pro
duce market will probably
close Wednesday, ending a
operation of the Junior Cham
h■ -■ of Commerce, it was learn
ed here today.
4-H KING A^ix QUEEN
LUMBERTON—Peggy Law
son and Billy Sessoms have
been crowned Queen and King
of health for Robeson coun
ty for 1947. The coronation wa»
the highlight of a recent Robe
son county 4-H club county
council meeting.
NEW SCOUT MASTER
WARSAW—Claude Hale has
been appointed scoutmaster
of Warsaw Boy Scout troop
No. 20 to succeed W. M. Buck,
who is away at school. Mr.
Hale came to Warsaw recent
ly from Seneca, S. C., where
he was active in scout work,
LAND RE-VALUATION
ELIZABETHTOWN—Bladen
county real estate is now un
der the process of being re
valued under the direction of
D. A. Harris, supervisor of the
re-valuation board. The board
hopes to complete the work by
January 1.
STOBM DAMAGE
CLINTON—Hail and wind
damage to tobacco and other
crops in northern section of
Sampson was reported to have
run into thousands of dollars
following a storm which struck
that section Monday night.
DUrLIN STUDENTS
WALLACE — Among those
fiiling dormitory offices left
vacant at the end of the first
summer sessions at East Caro
lina Teachers College are Miss
Margaret Carr of Wallace, at
Cotten Hall; and Miss Victoria
Kornegay of Warsaw, at Flem
ming Hall.
SUNDAY SCHOOL CLLNIC
ELIZABETHTOWN—A Sun
day School Improvement Clinic
will be held at the First Bap
tist church in Bladenboro be
ginning Monday, July 28, and
continuing through Friday eve
ning, August 1. The officers
and teachers of the Sunday
school and church will meet
at 7:45 o'clock each evening.
MEETING POSTPONED
WARSAW—The Charles R.
Gavin Post No. 127 of the
Americun Legion will not hold
its regular monthly meeting TJI
July, Commander J. C. Page
has announced. The next meet
ing is slated for August 23
at which time important plans
for the Armistice Day cele
bration will be made.
WATER SAMPLES MAILED
SHALLOTTE — Samples of
water from the Shallotte lee
Plant deep well were sent off
last week for testing by State
chemists. The object was in
accordance with tentative
plans to construct a small
waterworks system, using
water from this well.
THE TELLER TELLS
Southport Newsmen’s Checks
Must Be On Their Accounts
special To T!ie Star
SOUTHPORT, July 27 - While
Prince O’Brien, cashier of the
Waccamaw Bank and Trust com
pany branch at Southport, was
getting a lot of commendation
for his assistance to the FBI in
capturing John Leonard Boyer,
Jr., for attempting to pass fraudu
lent checks, two Souhtport men
learned to their great surprise
that they had been writing checks
or. a bank in which they had no
account.
Jimmie Harper and Bill Kezia
share a large desk pretty much in
common in an office at Southport.
At least they share it in common
when Bill is not gone fishing or
Jim is not at home minding the
baby.
The Southport ar.d Shallot e '
branches of the Waccamaw Bank
and Trust company have identi- i
VENETIAN BLINDS
ILL SIZE BLINDS MADE AND
KEFINISHKD
STRICKLAND VENETIAN
BLIND WORKS
’honr 8404 Cantlp Ravnc Road
H^Sh^^Masrir
G U R R Jewelers
W ilmington’s Fins Jeweler
ZM N. Front 8t. Ilial mu
IT’S USEFUL!
:«EPEUEH>
-: />
INSECT
SPRAY
Containing
DDT
„ YooTl Fiad It Here! |
wmois
HARDWARE COMPANY
Corner Front and Dock
Dial 9043
cal names. Counter checks are
identical, excepting for the name
of the towns on the checks date
line. Both Shallotte and Southport
is spelled with the same number
of letters and unless one makes
sure he may be writing a check
on one bank when his funds, if
he has any, are in the other.
Several days ago Harper brougt
a pad of counter checks around to
the office and promptly filled out
one in payment to somebody or
other. The next day Keziah also
had occasion to write a check and
did so, using the same pad of
counter checks.
The checks were honored when
they reached the bank, but in
stead of sending them ott to
Shallotte for collection, O'Brien
put them on file until he could
have a word with htose two iel
lows. He wanted to know if they
were banking out of town or with
him?
MEET MRS.
E. E. E. A. Y. SHELL
SCOTTSBLUFF, Neb.—(U.R)—On
March 4, 1888, just a few days after
Nebraska’s worst blizzard, a daugh
ter was bom to the Yeoman fam
ily. She was named Eighteen
Eighty Eight Ann Yeoman. Event
ually Miss Yeoman got married
and moved to another state. She
returned to this vicinity recently.
Now she signs her name “Mrs. E.
E. E. A. Y. Shell.”
STORK TAKES BACK SEAT
WASHINGTON — (U.R) — An ex
pectant mother racing the stork to
a Washington hospital in a private
automobile must stop for the red
traffic light even if she has a police
escort. George E. Keneipp, direc
tor of traffic, ruled tnat the traffic
code permits only police, firemen
and ambulance drivers responding
to emergency calls to ignore traffic
signals.
G^ortrait clime
is
Vacation clime
LET US MAKE YOURS
Adams Studio
22 Years In Wilmington
8th Floor Trust Bldg.
H. Berger & Son
Furniture ant! Home Furnishings
July Clearance Sale — Prices Slashed Below Cost
707 NORTH FOURTH ST.DIAL 6128
JIMMY DEATON, above, left, needs help from Thomas Salmon
to display his catch of large-month bass taken from a lake Inside
the city limits. The fish on the left of the string weighs six and
three-quarter pounds and the total weight of the four is 19 pounds.
Deaton, in addition to landing these fish, had 11 strikes in the one
and a half hours he fished yesterday. (Staff Photo by Boy Cook)
FISHERMEN ARE LIKE THAT
They Never Seem To Learn
That Fish Are In Backyard
By CARL CAHILL
Star Staff Writer
Since the first whalebone was
moulded into a fishhook fishermen
have been spending handsome
sums on attractive lures and trek
king long distances to try them
out.
They never seem to learn that
the pond in other fields is no better
than the one at home.
No sc with Jimmy Deaton, 2010
Princess street.
Deaton stepped out of his house
yesterday morning and strolled
over to Salmon's Lake, just a
block away.
He cast his plug in about 9 a. m.
and for the next one and half
hours he didn’t have time to un
tangle a backlash.
He caught four large-mouth bass,
the largest weighing six and three
quarter pounds, and had 11 strikes,
strikes.
The fish together weighed 19
pounds.
But that's nothing. Deaton said
he once landed a bass in the lake,
formerly an old rock quarry at
21st and Prjncess streets, that
weighed over eight pounds.
True, Deaton was using an arti
ficial plug, models of which can
be bought with centerboard op
tional. A super deluxe model is
supposed to mate for awhile with
unsuspecting fish.
But he said the fish at the lake
would snap at anything that mov
ed, even a privy door hinge tied
to a line.
Minnows are good, too, but they
gotta be big. A minnow that
weighs about a pound makes good
bait. These bass don’t like small
stuff.
Which brings to mind the state
ment made recently by a conser
vationist of the state of North
Carolina. He averred that the rea
son people don’t catch fish is be
cause they aren’t smart enough.
Thomas Salmon, who owns the
lake from which the piscatorial
beaujes were taken, has never
caught one. But the brain angle
doesn’t apply to him. He doesn’t
like to fish.
A fish caught nowadays and dis
played prominently doesn’t have
long to wait before it takes a back
seat. They get bigger all the time.
So. if you drop down to Salmon
Lake (inside the city limits) be
sure and lock your tackle box if
you put it near the shore. These
fish go to any means to bite a
hook.
And don’t be surprised if one
knocks at your door and wants in
—he probably wants his picture
in the paper.
Impressive Worship Service
Is Held At Camp Millstone
4-H Club Members From
New Hanover, Brunswick
Attend Vespers
Bv JOHN SIKES
Star Correspondent
CAMP MILLSTONE, July 27.—
In the sundown solitude of this
pine-sentinelled glade sloping down
to Millstone Lake, 144 4-H club
members worshipped with impres
sive candlelight vespers here this
evening.
Club members from New Han
over, under the leadership of C. R.
Cook, assistant county agent, and
Miss Nancy Ingram. assistant
home demonstration agent, and
Brunswick counly. led by James
Dodson, county agent, and Mrs.
Alene Mintz, home demonstration
agent, took a leading part in the
ceremonies.
Leaders of the worship, each car
rying candles in the early dusk,
filed down to a rustic altar across
a narrow branch of the lake from
the big sandstone boulders from
which the camp takes its name and
read and sang the service. On
the bculdcrs most of the 144 camp
ers from New Hanover, Brunswick
and Anson counties were perched
to watch the ceremonies. Undei
a flaming cross, superimposed on
a living pine tree, the choir, com
posed of 16 girls from Brunswick
county, led the singing. After read
ing of the scripture, the singing of
hymns and the reading of poems,
the worship leaders, candles in
hands, filed back to the boulders,
their candlelight reflecting in the
still waters of the lake. There
they were joined by the other
worshippers and all together they
filed back on the grass-carpeted
slopes to the big camp-fire in
front of the rustic assembly hall.
The services began with the call
to worship by Thomas Johnson,
New Hanover. This was followed
by a solo by Betty Anne Horton of
Nearby Ellerbe, “When I Survey
the Wondrous Cross.’’
The litany was given by Evelyn
Gore of New Hanover and Harold
Olsen, also of New Hanover, read
Psalm 19. The Shallotte choir
sang “Near the Cross” and Kay
Monsees, camp program director,
told the story of “Christ in the
trees.
Mary Louise Gaiphin, New Han
over, recited the poem “I Saw God
Wash the World Last Night” and
the Shallotte choir sang “This Is
My Father’s World.” A prayer
was offered by Catherine Clem
mons. Brunswick, and then the
worshippers filed from the boulder
strewn amphitheatre while the
Shallotte choir, underneath the
flaming cross with their reflections
shining in the darkening waters ot
the lake, sang “Follow the Gleam.”
The ceremonies were witnessed
by hundreds of visitors from sur
rounding counties, among whom
Was R. W.. Gaiphin, New Hanover
county agent, who joined the camp
ers last night.
Earlier in the day cabin number
9, whose chief 1« Brunswick’s vet
eran «gent James Dodson, won
the 4-H banner for the best house*
keeping for the second consecutive
day, beating out four other cabins
of boys and seven cabins of girls.
The encampment, starting last
Friday, will continue until Tues
day.
Telephone Officials
On Vacation Without
Wives Or Telephones
Special to the star
SOUTHPORT. July 28.—Twenty
eight officials of the Southern Bell
Telephone company, from offices
throughout North Carolina, are
spending a week at one of the local
beaches. They are without bene
fit of the presence of wives or
other attachments.
Although destined to have it as
soon as possible, the rapidly grow
ing beach at which the telephone
officials are staying is without tele
phone service of any kind.
O. G. Bain, of the Wilmington
District of the Bell company, was
Interviewed by a reporter today.
He reluctantly admitted that it
might be that some of the wives
knew their husbands could nor
have ;.nv telephone numbers with
them, that it would not do them
any good if they had. So, this ap
parently accounted for the gather
ing without wives.
FRIENDS PROVE PROPHETIC
ALTUS, Okla—(U.R)—When Eve
lyn Osburn was a little girl, new
acquaintances mistakenly used to
spell her last name "Osborne.”
Now, she doesn’t care if they do.
She became the bride of W. P.
Osborne in a wedding ceremony at
Wilmington. Cal.
WHITEVILLE WINS
SUNDAY CONTEST
Georgetown Club Wins Sat
urday Tilt, 5-0; Drops
Second 5 To 2
Bv JIGGS POWERS
Star Sports Correspondent
WHITEVILLE, July 27 — The
Whiteville Comets split a two
game series with the Georgetown,
S C. team of the Coastal League
Saturday and Sunday', The Comets
dropped the first game played in
the South Carolina city, 5 to 0,
but came back here this after
noon to cop a 5 to 2 victory.
Saturday night Dan Williams
was on the mound for the East
ern State league club, and he al
lowed the South Carloina lads five
hits. Stanley was the victim of
three costly errors, however and
saw his teammates march back
to the dugout time after time.
Richards, lefthander of the
Georgetown club gave up only four
hits. Leading the hitters in the
first game was Watrall with 2 for
4. Howard Atkins was the big gun
for the Comets, he also collected
2 for 4.
In the Sunday game each team
collected seven hits. Norwood
Chestnut hurled for the locals and
Watrall did mound duty for the
Georgetown club. The collection
of hits by the Comets included a
trpile by Buck Hardee, a brace a
double of Joe Proctor and a double
by “Chesty” Chestnut.
'The leading batsman for the
Comets was skipper Earl Brink
ley with three for four. Thomas
set the pace for the losers with
a triple and two singles in four
times at bat.
100 loir
AT COLLEGE
Another 100 Expected
When Second Registra
tion Is Held
Approximately 100 students al
ready have enrolled in the Wil
mington College as the result of
tfie pre-registration conducted last
week, Dean Dale Spencer, report
ed last night.
Other registration will be held at
the New Hanovc- high school be
fore classes commence following
Labor day, the dean added. It is
hoped that possibly another 100
students will enter classes at that
time.
Following enrollment last Thurs
day and Friday, siting of instruc
tors has begun.
W. K. Dorsey, Western Kentucky
Teachers college and the Univer
sity of W’yoming, has been named
coordinator of distributive educa
tion. Dorsey is expected to arrive
the last of this week to start his
work. He will also hold a similiar
post in the high school here.
He recently completed a train
ing program course at the Curtis
Wright Trade school at Buffalo,
N. Y.
City Briefs
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Ferrell, of
Burgaw, announce the birth of a
son, William Graham Ferrell, on
July 18 at Marion Sprunt annex,
James Walker Hospital.
The annual Lions club picnic
will be held Thursday night on the
picnic grounds at the Fourth
street entrance to Greenfield
Lake, at 6:30 o'clock.
T. T. Hamilton, principal New
Hanover High school will serve as
discussion leader during the an
nual convention of North Carolina
principals in Chapel Hill, July 28
30, it was announced.
A small lots sale of surplus prop
erty wlil begin today at 8 a. m. at
Seymour Johnson Field, it was an
nounced Saturday. Book cases,
filing cabinets, lawn mowers, and
•other items will be sold.
The Drum and Bugle corps of
the Wilmington American Legion
post will hold a practice drill at
13th and Nun streets tonight be
ginning promptly at 7:30 ’oclock
in preparation for the Soap Box
Derby parade Wednesday morn
ing.
Distribution of World War II Vic
tory medals and the American
Defense Service medals through
out the Fifth Coast Guard Dis
trict will begin August 1, by the
United States Coast Guard, Lt.
Comdr., J. R. Scullion, public in
formation officer announced.
City Manager J. R. Benson, who,
for two days, was confined to his
home, 1903 Ann street, because of
illness, was reported recovered
last night, and probbaly will return
to his office today.
WHY WE SAY by STAN J. COUINS ILJ. SLAWSON
f" KIBITZER"
r\ r>
* >
3 I
< £
3
fww=r jr-. /
1 Today, one who gives unsolicited ad*
I vice at the card table, but originally it
referred to kibitz, a German name for
a bird wh' h gave out with a shrill cry
scaring away game birds upon the ap
proach of huntera.
AN ACTRESS and a professional
swimmer, Judy Cook, 25, Los
Angeles, Cal., has been subpoena
ed by the Senate War Investigat
ing Committee which is probing
wartime aviation contracts award
ed to Howard Hughes. Miss Cook
is pictured in one of the swim suits
which she wore while giving swim
ming exhibitions at Hughes’ par
ties. (International Soundphoto).
Obituaries
MRS. NOMA Z. COX
TABOR CITY, July 26—Mrs. No
ma Z. Cox, 80, Rt. 1, Tabor City,
died at her home early Friday
morning after a lengthy illness.
The body will remain at the Pessup
Innman Funeral Home until 2
o'clock, Sunday afternoon at which
time it will be removed to the
Sandy Plains Baptist church and
lie in state until 3 o’clock, when
the funeral will be held. The Rev.
Clyde Prince will officiate. Inter
ment will follow in the Norris
cemetery.
The survivors include two sons,
W. J. and C. M. of Columbus coun
ty; two daughters, Mrs. Malcie
Fowler and Mrs. Maude McDowell
of Tabor City; two brothers, Char
lie and John Norris of the Sandy
Plains section, four sisters, Mrs.
Lola Hardee of Lumberton; Mrs.
Ella Ray of Sandy Plains. Mrs.
Effie Cains and Mrs. Hattie Carter
of Daisy. '*
WILLIAM H. BORDEAUX
Funeral services for 'William H.
Bordeaux, 72, who died at nis resi
dence, Rt. 1, Delco, at 1 o’clock
yesterday afternoon after a long
illness, will be held at 11 o’clock
this morning at the Livingston Cha
pel church. The Rev. E. E. Ulrich
and the Rev. H. S. Strickland will
officiate. Interment will follow in
the church cemetery.
Mr. Bordeaux is survived by one
son, Edward Bordeaux of Middle
Sound; six daughters, Mrs. Mamie
Simmons, Mrs. Gertrude Reeves,
Mrs. Eva Davis, all of Delco; Mrs.
Minnie Wilkerson, Mrs. Violet Bro
gan, and Mrs. Addie Wallace, all
of Wilmington; six brothers, S. D.
and J. C. of Wilmington; Edgar A.
of Carolina Beach; Walter of Nor
folk, Va.: Jimmie, D. J.. of Delco;
three half brothers. Winslow of
Delco: Tommie of Fetersburgh,
Va.; and Rudolph of Sumter, S. C.
MRS. MINNIE LEE RUSHING
WHITEVILLE, July 27—Funeral
services for Mrs. Minnie Lee Rush
ing, 47, who died in a Wilming
ton hospital at 5:50 a. m. this
morning will be held from the
chapel of the MacKenzie funeral
home Monday afternoon at 4:30
o'clock.
The Rev. L. D. Haymen, pastor
of the Whiteville Methodist church
will officiate and interment will
follow in the Whiteville cemetery.
She is survived by her husband;
Carl Rushing. Two daughters, Mrs.
Robert Parks of Elizabethtown
and Miss Dorthy Lee Rushing of
Whiteville. Her mother, Mrs. Man
da Lee of Whiteville and one
sister. Mrs. Pearson Thompson oi
Whiteville.
MRS. SUSAN ELLEN CREECH
VVKITEVILLE, July 27—Funeral
services for Mrs. Susan Ellen
Creech, 73-year-old widow of the
late J. S. Creech, who died at the
home of her daughter, Mrs. Jimmy
Coffee in Banner Elk at 2 o’clock
Saturday, will be held from the
Chapel of the MacKenzie funeral
wme Monday afternoon at 2
i’clock.
The Rev. J. J. Raspberry will
3e in charge and interment will
'ollow in the Flynn cemetery.
She is survived by four daugh
;ers; Mrs M. C. Garris of States
ville, Mrs. J. I. Coffee of Banner
Elk, Mrs. Gertdude Faulk of Bol
;on and Mrs. Eula Treece of Kan
sas City. Two brothers; Hanry S.
Powell of Charleston and J. R.
Powell of Jacksonville, Fla., and
three sisters; Mrs. E. Claridy of
Conway, Mrs. Monith Mazzel] of
Jacksnoville. Fla., and Mrs.
Katie McDuffie of Uptownville.
3a.. eighteen grandchildren and
15 great grandchildren also sur
vive.
DUKE DIVINTY DEAN
DURHAM. July 27—(TP)—Dr. Har
old A. Bosley, minister of the
Mount Vernon Place Methodist
church, Baltimore, Md., has been
appointed dean 0f the Duke Uni
versity Divinity school. Dr. Robert
L. Flowers, resident of the univer
sity, has announced.
NURSIN/j SCHOOL INSTITUTE
DURHAM, July 27 — (TP) _ Miss
Helen Nahm, director of the divi
sion of nursing education at Duke
University will open the first an
nual session of the Duke Institute
cf administration in schools of
Nursing tomorrow morning at 9:30
a.m. with an address on "present
day social trends and their effort
upon nursing and nursing educa
tion.”
—-u — -•-AJit—
Harnett Farmer To Again
Go On Trial For His Lib
LILLINGTON, July 27 — UP) —
Charlie Phillips, 26, Angier ten
nant farmre who was saved from
execution through a recently-dis
covered suicide note allegedly
written by the wife he was once
convicted o' murdering, starts his
new trial here tomorrow.
Phillips will take the witness
stand for the first time says his
lawyer, Neill * Mck. Salmon of
Lillington. Salmon says he has
never lost a capital case in 27
years of practice.
No defense was offered at the
first trial last September. Phillips
was convicted by a jury and 'sen
tenced to die in the state's gas
chamber. Just before his schedul
ed execution a note written in red
ink on the back of a calendar
page was found by his sister, Mrs.
Willie Hayes. ' She said she had
found the note in a pair of slacks
belonging to Mrs. Etta Mae Phil
lips, 28. the defendant’s wife ol
eight years and mother of his two
children.
The note, dated Aug. 19. 1946,
the day Mrs. Phillips was shot to
death in their home, indicated that
she had tried suicide twice be
fore “but I am going through with
it today.”
The note indicated a triangle
in their lives, for it asked Phil
lips not to “go about with that
woman in Raleigh any more.”
It also asked Phillips to stop
drinking and take care of their
children, Alice Marie, 9, and
Charles (Tony) Phillips,- Jr., 5.
The children now are being cared
for by relatives.
On the basis of the note. Judge
W. H. S. Burgwyn granted a new
GREEN TO ADDRESS
PRINCIPALS’ MEET
AT CHAPEL HILL
CHAPEL HILL, July 27—(JP)—
Dr. Sylvester Green, editor of the
Durham Morning Herald, will ad
dress the opening dinner session ol
the North Carolina principals’ as
sociation to be held in Ler.oir h^U
at the University of North Carolina
here Monday night.
The three-day program, which
opens Monday night, will continue
through Wednesday, July 30,
Jonathan Daniels, executive news
editor of the Raleigh News and
Observer, will speak at a dinner
session Tuesday night, July 29 at
6:30.
In addition to the two evening
sessions, the conference will work
in separate discussion groups
throughout Tuesday and Wednes
day morning.
Between 300 and 400 principals
from throughout the state are ex
pected to attend, according to Prof.
Guy B. Phillips, director of the
summer session. They will be
housed in dormitories.
—FOR—
CORRECT TIME
Call 2-3575
—FOR—
Correct Jewelry
VISIT
fjjew^i Box
T a 1 mmmmanmmttns me
\Vi'V IO* N. FRONT ITRMT
Wilmington's Largest Credit
Jewelera
trial after a hear!:;- s
term of Harnett co = ■ ~'M
Court beginning to ' •
been ordered by G - «i
Cherry. Presiding ... . : egg
John J. Burney of \y -It
District Attorney j:
again will press the sit'
of murder in the first '• it
Phillips, who served
during the war, has" • >
county jail here s.. c. ' «
turned from the < t
Raleigh’s central j p
black-haired, he iia. •«
hammock in his cell, * 3 i
porters has seen ... . r«
the eve of the trial. H, ' **
ga-r.ed 10 pounds .. e
The state Shpren . 'i7'',
ed a new trial after
viction and before ' ■»
found. Defense Ay *i
said he will no' .....
verdict of second dt.y.
or manslaughter. '■
convict again. Ml ;aV ■:
right back to the Supre S|
Judge Burney i5
order a specia'l very "
other county. 11
The defense savs
about 25 witnesses'or
Phillips will be his o* °'
ness, Salmon said o:-t ' X<a" .
witnesses will be few, ,X *
there were no eve- ' "" !|
death. ‘
Mrs. Phillips was ■ ■ ..
with a pistol her hu '
he had borrowed from a 1
The weapon was givi
neighbor by a Hunga: ; aj?
colonel during the w;
lips said he had inte e*
it as a souvenir.
>LAN YOU R—
General Electric
Kiichen NOW!
EM;
BROS.
> I
: Absolute
Is A F E T Y
>
l —For Your—
; S A V i \ U S
START AN
ACCOUNT TODAY
: —WITH—
THE INSURED
1» EOI* I E5
Building & Loan Ass'n
Hm M. Hill. Secy-Treas
112 PRINCESS ST.
Berger's Dept. S(«n
Clothing For The Entire Family
YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD
709 North Fourth St.Dial 9(i4?
Your Roaches. Flies, Mosquitoes.
Sandflies, Bedbugs, and all Insect Life with
SHEPARD'S GUARANTEED INSECTICIDE?
For Repelling Horseflies ttse Shepard's Fl.v Guard
FOR SALE BY DEALERS EVERYWHERE Manufactured bi
JOS. C. SHEPARD
Wilmington, N. C. Dial
\ or mi:
CITY AND COUNTY TAX PAYERS
Additional penalty and advertising cost will be add
ed to all unpaid city and county taxes after Aug. Is*'
1947.
All unpaid 1946 taxes will be advertised Aug. 1st
C. R. Morse, City And
County Tax Collector
_ _
IJSXQM0 - nit"
world's wildest
TIGER COULD BE
K.O.DBV
THE
POWER IN
A SINGLE PROP OF
RICHFIELD GASOLINE/
Distributed By
FOUNTAIN OIL CO.
Wilmington, N. C. l>ia* ~

xml | txt