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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, August 31, 1947, SECTION B, Image 19

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-08-31/ed-1/seq-19/

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. .. GET IN THE SWIM FELLAS
By R. W. MADRY
CHAPEL HILL, Aug. 30—The hundreds of motorists
naming Woollen gymnasium at the University of North
Carolina these summer days, as they drive along Route 54,
often stop to ask if there’s a circus in town.
Ami little wonder. For they see several hundred young
aers. accompanied by their mothers or fathers—sometimes
^—assembling in front of Bowman Gray swimming pool
each morning.
jt!CV see bicycles, wagons, anc
•. parked near the building
,,(! nftc:. a few dogs tied to the
Ar0 ad Hi:30 a.m. a signal is
i0ur,ned and from the way the
yiers rush for the building
;ou wor'd really think they were
afraid of missing the first act of
a c;:-cus. Most of the parents are
left behind. .
In-ide the boys and girls, who
.. a'0 ;; age from threeto 15.
ferry down a long corridor in
WooISer. gymnasium, turn to the
and the boys enter one lock
er" room and the girls another.
Vn:' the children have undress
ed and properly placed their cloth
ina. to-.vcls. and other valuables in
lookers. they are directed to the
foo* bath, and then to the shower
room where each one is taught
how to operate the showers and
brh thoroughly before entering
the pool.
Then they are classified accord
ing to their swimming ability —
non - s'.vtmmers, beginners, inter
mediates, juniors, and advanced
students, and the swimming be
gin under competent teaching by
a staff of 10 instructors from the
n-■ -- ■■
University’s Department of Physi
cal Education.
“But swimming is only one part
of the program.’’ explains Coach
Clyde E. (Pete) Mullis who heads
up the staff of instructors. “The
slogan of the department is that
if they can walk they can be
taught not only how to swnn bui tne
habits of good citizenship and per
sonal hygiene at the same time.
“The results show that they
learn to cooperate in group ac
tion, to respect the rights of oth
ers, to protect others against the
spread of disease, and to follow
direction, respect proper au
thority, and be good followers as
well as good leaders.’’
The instructors, all of whom give
their time are convinced this prac
tice in citizenship is worth far
more than the theoretical
class discussions of the desirable
behavior of citizens.
The intructor are Coach Mul
lis. Dick Jamerson, the Univer
sity’s head swimming coach: Tom
I Scott, head baseball coach, and|
Coaches Henry House, Ralph
Casey, Mike Ronman. Crowell Lit
tle, Ben Ward, and Miss Mary
I' ranees Kellam and Frances
Burns, and Trainer Doc White.
More than 3500 children have
been taught to swim since ther
course was started in 1938.
If you want to see the proudest
parents in the world, just visit the
pool room day. Parents are en
couraged to attend a demonstra
tion period at the end of each
week, but they don’t wait for that.
Occasionally a newcomer balks
and puts on a crying act when
directed to enter the water, but
the instructors don’t give in. and
it’s not long before childish fears
are supplanted by confidence f nd
eager participation.
“It’s almst a miracle.” one
proud parent was heard to say.
“We tried to teach our boys for
two summers, and they have done
it in two weeks.”
Wilmington Hotel Dining Room
AIR CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT
fi:So to 11:00 A. 31.-11:30 to 2:30 P. 31.-5:00 to Closing
—-Our Food Speaks For Itself
‘I Want In Too’
UlintfmniwiVimr i- nnor n.
THIS YOUNGSTER whose name
was not given almost got out of
the picture, but he glues business
like eyes on the window of the
basket room top left, speculatively.
17 ENLIST IN
ARMY IN AUGUST
Five new recruits were sent to
Raleigh yesterday for a physical
examination to bring a total of
37 enlistees during the month of
August to surpass the monthly 25
men quota by '12 men for the U.
S. Army, it was announced yes
terday by Sgt. M. L. Cooper, re
cruiting staff member in the post
office building.
Cooper said that men 18 years
old, or 17 with their parents con
sent, could fenlist for regular Army
duty and that he would be in his
office today. Members of the staff
will journey to Whiteville and
ether Southeastern North Caro
lina cities next week.
Three men enlisting from the
Richland section were Elbert W.
Ervin, Gene O. Bell, and Raleigh .
L. Jarman.
One white man and one Negro :
enlisted from Jacksonville. They
were Gacy Jacobs and John W. 1
Simmons, respectively.
Dial 2-3311 For Newspaper Service .
HELD OVER!
•* IIIG DAYS
STARTING TODAY
-7JS 1 Adventure at-the
('U Gran Premio!
^fLfh Romance at the k
^ Ascot Cup! M
I
4
DAY 48c — 9c
1" — TUESDAY"" .
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HERE \OU SEE, left, the children lined np orderly to receive!
their bathing suits, towels, and soap from attendants in the basket
room. From the rear are, left to right, Instructors Dick Jamerson,
Doc White and Pete Muliis of the Bowman-Gray 3Iemorial pool,
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where on these hot days
approximately 500 children, 3 to 15 years, are learning not only how
to “get in the swim,’’ but how to be good citizens as well. Typical
scene, center, at the Bowman Gray Memorial pool. Here Coach Pete
31ullis, who heads up the program is demonstrating the gentle art
of diving. The course is free, except for a nominal $2 privilege charge
for bathing suits, soap, towels, and if there’s anything like it in any
other university in the land, Prof. Oliver Cornwell would like to know
about it. Here Coach Pete 3Iullis, right, is supervising a play period
in the swimming program. And you’ll note .hat the youngsters are
having the time of their lives. The instructors usually devote most of
Friday’s time to play periods, so the children will be eager to come
back for the next session the following 3Ionday.
Mrs. Yarbrough Named
V-Pres., National DAR
By GERTRUDE CARRAWAY
Staff Correspondent
NEW BERN, Aug. 31—Mrs. J. A. Yarbrough, of Char
lotte, state D, A. R. press relations chairman, has been
appointed by Mrs. Roscoe C. O'Byrne, president general,
as national vice chairman of the important tellers com
mittee.
This appointment comes in rec
ognition of h e r outstanding suc
cess in D.A.R. state chairman
ships. During the past year she
won the national prize for the best
pres srelations report and scrap
book from any state. Previously
during her other six years as state
D.A.R. press relations chairman
she made seven other press re
lations scrapbooks exhibited at the
Con:inental Congress in Washing
ton, twice winning second prize,
and twice winning hoorable
mention.
Besides serving as treasurer,
corresponding secretary and his
torian twice of the Mecklenburg
chapter, D.A.R., in Charlotte, she
wrote and presented a play,
“Origin of D.A.R. in North Caro
lina,” at the last conference pre
sided over by Mrs. W. H. Belk
of Charlotte as state regent. This
was a dramatization of the be
ginnings of Mecklenburg chapter,
“Mother Chapter” in this state.
In the United Daughters of the
Confederacy Mrs. Yarbrough has
also been an\ active leader and
worker. She is author of the histo
ry of the North Carolina division,
now in the hands of the printers.
She also wrote the play, “Fifty
Years ago,” in commemoration of
the Golden Jubilee of the division
in 1946, similar to the play, “Forty
Years Ago,” she wrote and pre
sented at the state U.D.C. con
vention while she was state U.D.C
historian.
In May, 1944, she edited the
North Carolina issue of the U.D.C.
Magazine and wrote ten articles
for it. She has written many arti
cles for other issues of that peri
odical. In the past 15 years she
has had 36 articles on Confederate
history published by the Charlotte
Observer, not including publicity
articles for the U.D.C.
Thirteen U.D.C. essay prizes
have been won by Mrs. Yar
brough. She has given eight
prizes. Twice she won the prize
for the best scrapbook in the gen
eral organization, twice in the
North Carolina division, one on
Sidney Lanier and one on Jeffer
so Davis. She compiled the vol
ume, “Anthology of Music Used
by Bands and Marching Men of
the Confederacy,” which won the
prize and is to be published by
the state U.D.C. The pageant,
“Some North Carolina Heroines,”
was written and presented by her
in 1941.
From 1917 to 1919 she was cor
responding secretary of her U.D.
C. chapter, president from 1921 to
1923. Among many other accom
plishments she originated and con
ducted the first tag day sale of
Confederate flags in the state.
From 1931 to 1933 she was chapter
historian, and again from 1938
through 1943. She was state his
torian 1936-38. For four years she
has been state chairman of Shiloh
records. She was state publicity
chairman 1935-36, also from 1943
through 1946. For eight years she
has been chairman of the Filing
and Lending Bureau of the gener
al organization.
in ouner organizations sne nas
also been outstanding. She has
been president of the Charlotte
Woman’s club and president of the
Charlotte Young Women’s Chris
tian association. For six years she
has served as president of the
North Carolina board of directors
of the Florence Crittenton home.
She was chairman of World War
II records for Mecklenburg coun
ty
During 1932 she started a Sun
day column, “Women Builders of
Charlotte,” for the Observer, writ
ing it for five years. From that
time on she has had a Sunday
column in that paper on “Inter
;sting Carolinians, ' as well as
many other feature stories for
numerous newspapers. In fact,
she has probably written up more
North Carolinians than any other
pe/on in the state, but, due to
her own retiring modesty, this is
perhaps the first article ever writ
ten about her and some of her
numerous and varied activities for
her community, state and nation.
About 2.7 tors cf oxygen are re
quired for every ton of coal burn
ed.
k
Fish life depends upon a very
small concentration of dissolved
oxygen in water.
Sis Knew Her Needs
As She Conducts A
Solo Sit-Down Strike
BALTIMORE, Aug. 30—OT>)—Sis,
a six-year-old mare hauling a wa
termelon wagon barnyard last
night, sat down in the street and
refused to budge.
Three men tugged in vain at
her reins before bystander Leo
Killey brought four bottles of
warm beer tgom a corner tavern,
and poured the beer down the
horse’s throat.
Sis licked her lips, bounded to
her feet and trotted off to the
barn.
SEL WARNING PROMISED
SMITHFIELD, Aug. 30 —{IP)—
Mayor W. J. Massey, Jr., has
promised to give himself a stern
warning in Mayor’s court Monday
night “not to violate the parking
laws again” in keeping with his
court’s- policy not to fine first of
fenders. The mayor’s car was tag
ged by policeman Carson Mc
Lamb .for parking in a place re
served for Dr. A. H. Rose.
Prices Always
Pins Tax I
TODAY - MONDAY
RADIO'S FIGHTING EDITOR IN A
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Thrilling action as the two
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TUESDAY—WEDNESDAY
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DOROTHY BAMOUR
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PACE SPEAKS
RALEIGH, Aug. 30.—(U.B—Rep.
Stephen Pace, D. Ga., said the
whole economy of the South was
involved in a fight for better
quality lint production and im
proved manufactured cotton good*
in an address to delegates to th«
farm and home week at State
college here last night.
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I
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MONDAY Family Theatre
JUNGLE THRILLS! .771 i°L
I In darkest Africa with man against
beasts and strange white women against
both.
i »Y
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9PPlDVEh-N0WS0.il
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Tete Smith Novelty
Musical Comedy • Latest News
I TUESDAY—WEDNESDAY ■ ■ ■■
RENFREW OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED FRI.—SAT.
in Charles Starrett
“YUKON FLIGHT” Smiley Burnett*
—Thursday Only— in
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Another Exciting, Action Hit!
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THE FEARLESS! THE LAWLESS!
MATCHED IN MURDEROUS FURY!
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MARGARET LINDSAY
a.lnli nniiiip FILMED IN
ANDY DEVINE

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IN TECHNICOLOR
Wilmington’s only m ■ W'^ fl Maiinee 30c
Air Conditioned I ^ W 1 I S 4 ■ Night _ 46c
Theatr# 5 T * PLUS TAX
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