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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, September 05, 1947, Image 2

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BOARD TO PROBE
* (Continued from Page One)
Abbottsburg children remained at
home.
•“No sir. we’re not sending
■tHpm,*' members of the Abbotts
burg delegation told the board.
" Members Bitter
.The vote to investigate the
Wheat Swamp situation came only
after some board members had
voiced bitter comments against
the strikes by school students.
-“I’m getting mad about one
thing—this strike business,” said
A- McL. Graham of Clinton.
“They’re striking agamst the
state, against the school. I think
if,should be squelched.”
“I’m opposed to taking any part
ill it (the Wheat Swamp dispute)
as long as the situation exists
there as now exists,” said A. S.
Brower of Durham. “Get the chil
dren back in school and then
come back and ask for an in
vestigation.”
He Vote
On the vote for an investigation
of-the Wheat Swamp situation, the
board tied at five to five, and Lt.
Gpv. L. Y. Ballentine. who pre
sided, cast hi3 vote in favor of
holding the probe.
II. S. COURT VOIDS

(Continued From Page One)
on in Alderson, W Va., ws ? con
victed by an • a;m.v tribunal in
Germany of participating in the
theft cf $1.50r one worth of the
Eesre crown jewels from Kron
biig castle, Germany.
Her husband. Jack W. Durant,
former Army "Oljnel was con
victed and sentenced to 15 years
at hard labor for his part in the
,d for Mrs. Durant, who is
41, filed a petition In the District
cOu;t here last June for her re
lease from prison on a writ of
habeas corpus, and a hearing on
it was held in mid-July.
TJ. E District Attorney Leslie E.
Given explained that it would now
b« up to the Justice department to
decide the government’s next step
in the case.
I*
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Jon Hall
Andy Devine
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CHARLES
8TARRETT
SMILEY
BURNETTE
* IN
"WEST OF DODGE
COUPLE RECOVERING
AFTER EXPLOSION
ABOARD SMALL BOAT
A youthful couple today were
reported well on the road to re
covery after a gasoline explosion
in the Carolina Beach yacht basin
that sent the two to James Walker
Memorial hospital.
They are George Applewhite Jr.,
20, of Carolina Beach, still con
fined to the hospital, and Martha
Sue Taylor, IS, of Maury, N. C.,
rported by hospital attendants as
discharged. \
The couple suffered bums on the
legs and feet. Authorities said the
couple jumped overboard and
made their way to shore after the
explosion Wednesday i__ght.’
The yacht was burned to the
water’s level and was towed to the
basin dock. Cause of the explosin
had not been ascertained.
LAWLESSNESS RIFE
(Continued From Page One)
ces of the United States, said
that 15 billion dollars of American
town of Sweet Home, Ore , where
the vault was swollen with logging
payroll money.
Working as leisurely as their
pokey mountaineer drawls, two
armed men corralled eight em
ployes and seven customers in the
bank vault, scooped up $57,500 in
small denomination bills and sped
away in a black sedan to vanish
cleanly into the high Cascade
mountain country nearby.
It was the biggest bank robbery
in Oregon’s history. Police said it
set a local pattern of perfection.
Th method was basically that
used three months earlier to rob
the E. G. Young bank at Oak
land, 100 miles south of Sweet
Home.
FORRESTAL HITS
(Continued From Page One)
money “has gone abroad to pre
vent famine and to provide hope
for desperate millions throughout
the world.”
He said that the United States
had not objected to carrying the
main burden of material help al
most singlehandedly “but it would
be an understatement to say that
we have been disappointed in the
response of some nations to whom
we have held out the hand of help
and friendship only to meet with
rebuff and invective.”
DRIVE IN-THEATRE ,
Midway between If ilmlnyton j
and Carolina Beach
Fri.-Sat. ||g|
Joel McCrea and
Barbara Stanwyck
—In—
“BANJO ON
MY KNEE”
Plus News and
Color Cartoon
First Show at 7:45.
GLORIOUS
ROMANCE
AGAINST A
BACKGROUND
OF
THRILLING
ACTION!
■Mm
TODAY • FRI. - SAT.
f
Here's WELCOME news you'll greet
with cheers . . . They're together
again after three long years I
BEGINNING SUNDAY!
BAILEY
EASTERN TOBACCO
(Continued From Page One)
Tuesday’s average and the lowest
average of the season by 16 cents.
Fair to better qualities exper
ienced a stronger demand on the
Eastern North Carolina markets,
with smoking leaf showing var
iations up to $2 when compared
with Tuesday’s prices. A notice
able drop in deliveries to the flue
cured stabilization corporation
was reported by the Federal-State
Marketing Service.
Gross sales Wednesday on this
belt totaled 6,737,431 pounds for
an average of $42.72—this is $1.25
below Tuesday, but was due
largely to lower prices by grades.
Average price, per hundred
pounds, for a limited number of
grades on the Border Belt yes
terday:
Leaf—Fine lemon $55, up $1;
good lemon $51, unchanged; low
lemon $40, down $3; good orange
$45, down $3; common orange
¥22.50, down $1; low green orange
side $25, down $3.
Smoking leaf—Good lemon $55,
up $1; fair lemon $50, down $3;
common orange $28, unchanged.
Cutters—Good lemon $61, up $2;
fair orange $57, unchanged; low
orange $52, down $1.
Lugs—Good lemon $52, un
changed; fair lemon $40, down
$4; fine orange $57, up $2; low
orange $27, down $1.
Nondescript—Best thin $13, up
$2.
Average price, per hundred
pounds, for a limited number of
grades on the Eastern North
Carolina belt yesterday:
Leaf—Good lemon $52, unchang
ed; fair lemon $49, unchanged;
good orange $46, unchanged; fair
orange $41, down $1; low orang
$34, down $2; common orange $26,
down $1.
Cutters—Fair lemon $58, down
$1; low lemon $55, up $1; low
orange $52, down $1.
Lugs—Choice lemon $58, up $2;
fine lemon $57, up $2; good lemon
$53, up $2; fair lemon $45, up $1;
good orange $50, up $4; fair
orange $41, up $1; low orange $29,
down $1.
Primings—Fair lemon $41, un
changed; low orange $23, up 50
cents.
Nondescript—Best thin $11.50,
down 50 cents.
BUSINESSMEN FEAR
(Continued From Page One)
situation. Actually the editorial
was aimed against Hindu corre
spondents who accompanied Jaw
aharlai Nehru, prime minister of
Hindustan India, on his tour of
the Punjab and who, it is com
plained, wrote biased dispatches.
But the Pakistan Times failed
to identify the correspondents as
Indians, and the Moslems inter
preted it as aimed against Ameri
can and other Western corre
spondents.
So far there has been no de
mand by Americans for mass
evacuation by the American Em
bassy. The Lahore consulate is
watching the situation.
FATAL RIOTING BREAKS
OUT IN NEW DELHI
NEW DELHI, India, Sept 4 —(U.R)
—Fatal rioting broke out in this
capital of Hindu India today, 20
days after Independence Day, and
a curfew was imposed in Karachi,
capital of Moelem Pakistan, after
the murder of a Sikh there.
At least five persons were killed
and 40 wounded up to mid-after
noon in the teeming old ijelhi sec
tion of the capital.
VANDENBERG CALLS
(Continued From Page One)
encouraging, the most stimulating
international action since the close
of hostilities.”
As if in response to foreign pro
paganda charge that the United
States imposed its own will in the
drafting of the agreement, Mas
shall declared:
‘‘None of the 19 nations concern
ed sought to impose its will on the
others. Agreement was reached on
a voluntary basis, each nation
manifesting its will to adjust its
own position to that of the others
out of respect for the opinion of
the majority.
‘‘No nation triumphed over any
other,” Marshall continued, "for
this was not a contest between na
tions but a ’get-together’ among
them. And yet there resulted no
watered-down formula—no lowest
common denominator of compro
mise on vital principles.”
No Policy Questions
The secretary did not discuss in
his brief radio talk any foreign
policy questions other than the for
mulation of the new pact. He des
cribed the treaty as having com
mitted the nations of the Ameri
can hemisphere ‘‘to act collective
ly for the peace and security of
the new world and to do this in
accordance with the provisions of
the charter of the United Nations.”
TOUGHER
THAN "DILLINGER"!
THE COLDEST KILLER
A WOMAN EVER
LOVED! ... OR HATED
LAWRENCE TIERNEY
CLAIRE TREVOR
WALTER SLEZAK
•BORN
TO KILL”
No children under 15 will be
admitted. It’s too ruthless!
ROYAL
STARTS SUNDAY!
Regular OCc ^us
Prices Tax
HAMBONE’S MEDITATIONS
By Alley
(dey SAYS ABSENCE
MEK DE HEAHf GROW
FONDUH - UH-HUH}
AN* SOMETIME. DE
MO' ABSENT, DE MO'
FONDUH!
(Released by The Bell By*
dlcate. Inc.) Trade Mark
*v> Re«. Uv 8. Pat. Offlce)
l-S-HT
City Briefs
The many friends of the Rev.
E. B. Papazisis, pastor of St.
Nicholas Orthodox church, who
was operated upon Wednesday for
a throat ailment, will be pleased
to learn that he is resting com
fortably at his home.
Boy Scout officials announced
late yesterday afternoon that the
monthly Court of Honor, sched
uled to be held at the courthouse
next Monday night has been called
off. The next Court of Honor for
the Wilmington area will be held
on the dirst Monday night in Octo
ber.
E. C. Snead, assistant collector
of customs, will return to his of
fice in the Custom House the latter
part of next week, it was reported
yesterday.
Col. John B. Hughes, acting dis
trict engineer, will- return to his of
fice in the Custom House, Wednes
day, it was announced yesterday.
Hamilton Hicks, public relations
officer for the Engineers Depart
ment, will return to work at his
office in the Custom House Mon
day morning.
A Farmer’s Club Supper was
held in the Wrightsboro Clubhouse
last night at 7: SO o’clock with John
Sikes. Wallace tobacco man being
the principal speaker, it was an
nounced.
Southeastern North Carolina
Beach association prizes for the
forthcoming Fall Fishing Rodeo
will be on display beginning Satur
day at Shoemakers Office supply
store J. J. Hudiburg, secretary of
the SENCBA said yesterday, He
said the trophies awarded for prize
cai'chs would remain at Shoemak
ers for a week, and then be shifted
to the following display sites: Pick
ards Sporting store, (one week;;
Gregg Hardware, (one week);
Newell’s Drug, (Wrightsville
Beach) (one week); Ocean Plaza,
Carolina Beach), (one week).
Miss Charlotte Lowe, former
Wilmingtonian, will present the
first of a series of voice recitals
here over Radio Station WMFD
today at 6:30 p. m. She will ap
pear at various churches in this
area during the next two weeks.
The Wilmington Life Underwrit
ers association will meet at 12:30
p. m., today at the Crystal restau
rant. A feature of the program
will be an address by George Al
bright official of the Life Insur
ance Company of Virginia.
The Weather
Weather bureau report of temperature
and rainfall for the 24 hours ending 8
p. m., in the principal cotton growing
areas and elsewhere:
Station High Loiv Precip.
WILMINGTbN _ r
Alpena _ — 77 57 —
Asheville __ rj —
Atlanta _ 95 68 —
Atlantic City_ 86 71 .36
Birmingham _ 95 68 —
Boston _ 86 65 —
Buffalo _ 84 63 —
Burlington _ 84 58 .04
Charlotte _ 95 64 —
Chattanooga - 96 60 —
Chicago _•- 77 69 .11
Cincninati _ 77 69 .07
Cleveland _ 86 66 —
Dallas _101 73 —
Denver _ 85 56 —
Detroit _ 83 66 .03
Duluth _ 79 61 —
El Paso___ 96 70 —
Fort Worth_ 99 75 —
Galveston - 92 78 —
Houston - 96 72 —
Jacksonville_ — 72 —
Kansas City _ 93 86 —
Key West _ 89 77 —
Knoxville - 92 60 —
Little Rock _ 104 68 —
Los Angeles _ 99 60 —
Louisville _ 76 67 .20
Memphis _101 68 —
Meridian _— 102 65 —
Miami _ 91 74 .02
Minn.-St. Paul- 75 65 .13
Mobile __- 94 74 —
Montgomery - 95 73 —
New Orleans_ 97 77 —
New York _ 86 68 —
Norfolk 92 69 —
Philadelphi # 87 65 .03
Phoenix -114 72 —
Pittsburgh - 87 66 —
Portland, Me. - 80 55 —
Raleigh - — 96 66 —
Richmond - 95 66 —
St. Louis _ 97 77 —
San Antonio —•- 95 70 —
San Francisco - — 50 —
Savannah - 96 76 —
Seattle - 71 59 —
Tampa - 92 72 .37
Vicksburg - 99 68 —
Washington - 94 68 —
NAVY ENLISTS SIX!
MEN AT LOCAL STATION
Five Southeastern North Caro
lina men enlisted in the U. S. Navy
yesterday through the locad re
cruiting station in the Post Office
building, it was announced by re
cruiters.
The recruiting agents said that
the five men make a total of 12
men for this month as they have
completed one-half of their 25 mer.
a-month quota.
All of the enlistees are non
veterans and signed up for three
years as apprentice seamen.
They are, James Elbert Kirby,
Harold Charles Robinson, Rifton
Evoll Cellers, and Bennie Rogers
Sellers, all of Supplj, and Joa Bd
ward of Clarkton.
OBITUARIES
MRS. EDWARDS X. TAYLOR, SR.
Funeral services for Mrs. Ed
ward T. Taylor, Sr., 509.Orange
street, will be held this aft
ernoon at 4 o’clock horn the First
Presbtyerian churcti with Dr. Wil
liam Crowe, Jr., officiating. Inter
ment will be in Oakdale cemetery.
Mrs. Taylor, prominent socially
in Wilmington, died suddenly in
James Walker Memorial hospital
last night at 7:45 o’clock.
The daughter of the late Henry
Clay and Julia Bradford Cox Mrs.
Taylor was born in Camilla, Ga.,
Mar. 2, 1888. She was raised in
Albany, Ga., and came 10 IVLining
ton in 1914.
She was the widow of the late
Edward T. Taylor, Sr.
Surviving are two sons, Edward
T. Taylor, Jr., Salisbury and John
Douglas Taylor, Wilmington; one
sister, Mrs. William F. Robeitson,
Salisbury and one brother, Cleve
H. Cox, Albany, Ga.
Pallbearers will be her grand
nephews, Walker Taylor. Jr. Clay
ton Smith, Preston Oliver, Wil
liam H. Thornton, Allen T. Strange
and Victor Tgylor.
Funeral arrangements are in
charge of Wards’ Funeral Home.
LLOYD CROCKER
Funeral services for Lloyd
Crocker, 63, superintendent of the
Wilmington district of the Atlan
tic Coast Line Railroad company
who died suddenly at his office
here Tuesday night at 10:30
o’clock, were conducted from the
late residence, 1405 Princess street,
yesterday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock.
The Rev. J. A. Russell, pastor
of Grace Methodist church, assist
ed by the Rev. Walter B. Freed,
pastor of St. Paul’s Lutheran
church officiated. Interment fol
lowed in Oakdale cemetery.
Pallbearers were:
Active: B. H. Cobb, H. J. Jones,
J. F. Rogers, A. H. Williams, A.
A. Keels, and Midshipman Wade
Harris*
Honorary: C. McD. Davis, Rob
ert Scott, L. S. Jeftoras, F. B.
Langley, C. B. Sibley, F. L. King,
R. L. Groover, R. G. Murchison,
R. B. Hare, A. R. Brinkley, O.
T. Waring, O. H. Page, W. H. Hen
derson, R. A. Farmer, H. H. El
liott, S. A. Haynes, E. Franks, Dr.
J F. Robertson, Dr. D. R. Murch
inson, Dr. E. T. Walker, E. P.
Weathersby, F. Nichols and Her
bert Kendall.
MRS. HETTIE KNOWLES
CLINTON. Sept. 4. — Mrs. Hettie
Knowles, 75, died early Wednesday
at the home of her son, S. H.
Knowles, in Asheboro.
Funeral services were held yes
terday afternoon at 3 o'clock from
Ref Hill Universalist church with
the Rev. M. C. MacQueen, of
Clinton, in charge. Burial follow
ed in the church cemetery.
Surviving besides her son, are
one daughter, Mrs. S. C. Hill of
Wilmington; two sisters, Mrs.
Mary Bryant of Magnolia; Mrs. O.
M. Rich cf Richmond, Va., and
one brother, Thadeus Vann of Rose
Hill.
C. E. SIMPSON
C. E. Simpson, Jr., 218 Keaton
avenue, was advised yesterday
morning of the death of his father
at 619 Pennsylvania .avenue, Nor
folk, Va. The elder Mr. Simpson
was 75 years of age. He is survived
by his widow, three daughters and
two sons. Funeral services will be
held Saturday afternoon at 2
o’clock at the Brown Funeral home
in Norfolk.
t WESLEY B. VARNAM
SUPPLY, September 4. — Wesley
B. Varnam, 58, died Tuesday
mght at 11:05 p. m. at his home in
Supply, in Brunswick county. He
had suffered from a kidney ail
ment for a long time.
Surviving are his wife, Roxie
Varnam, two daughters, Ethei Gal
loway and Gracis Hageman; four
sons, Garland, Durbin, Milto-i and
Hurbert Varnam; and 10 giand
children.
Funeral services were conduct
ed from Dixon chapel yesterday
afternoon at 4 o’clock, and inter
ment followed in the church ceme
tery.
A. E. BLOUNT
LUMBERTON, September 4. —
A. C. Blount, 69, died at the home
of his daughter, Mrs. Boyd Stone,
near Bryant’s Mill Pond in Bla
den county, Wednesday at 11 a.
m. The funeral was conducted
from Zion’s Tabernacle church,
yesterday at 4:30 p. m. by the Rev.
George H. Wallace and R. A.
Stankwytch. Interment followed
in Kinlaw cemetery.
Surviving are his wife, Mrs.
Julia Blackwell Blount; one son,
A. W. Blount of Lumberton, Rt. 5;
and five daughters; Mrs. Allie B
Allen of Rt. 1, Mrs. Boyd Stone,
of Tar Heel, Mrs. Grace Williams
of Lumberton, Mrs. Bennie Koonce
of Hope Mills, Rt. 1, and Mrs. M.
M. Jordan of Laurinburg.
General Electric
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WHIS HUf HAIU
Funeral services for 'Whis Huf
ham, 1016 South Third street, who
died’ Wednesday in the Jefferson
Hospital, Philadelphia, after a brief
illness, will be held Saturday morn
ing at 11 o’clock. The Rev. George
Sanders will officiate and inter
ment will follow in Bellevue ceme
tery.
Mr. Hufham is survived by his
widow Mrs. Bessie Hufham; two
sons, Harry and Whis Hufham, Jr.,
of Wilmington; daughters, Mrs. A.
W. Ammenhauser; Mrs. Edward
Mallory, and Mrs. Bessie Horne,
of Wilmington; one sister, Mrs.
A. L. Dew, of Delco; six grand
children, nephews and nieces.
Active pallbearers will be Her
bert Bordeaux, W. B. Glenn, John
Voss, W. B. Boykin, Birt Kite, Ar
thur Humphrey.
Honorary pallbearers will be
John Croom, William Hood, L. D.
Lotta, Henry Sherman, Dr. J. D.
Freeman, Dr. Auly Crouch, Sr.,
Dr. Auly Crouch, Jr., Dr. Murchi
son, J. B. Coley, Dio Lewis, and
George Conant.
D. M. DUNCAN
TABOR CITY, Sept. 4. — D. M.
Duncan, 81, died at the home of
his son, J. D. Duncan on R-l,
Chadbourn, early this morning.
Funeral services will be held at
the Beaver Dam Baptist church,
Friday afternoon at 4 o’clock, with
the Rev. Noah Duncan officiating.
Interment will follow in the Mc
Phearson cemetery.
The survivors include two sons,
J. D., of R-l, Chadbourn, and Abe
of R-3, Whiteville; two daughters,
Mrs. Lizzie Cribb of R-3, Chad
bourn, and Mrs. Lula Cartrett of
Bolton.
MRS. BALLARD NAMED
JAYCETTES SCOUT
LEADER AT MEETING
Mrs. Carolyn Ballard was
appointed by the board of directors
of the Jayceettes to serve as leader
of the Girl Scout troop sponsored
by the organization, at the regular
dinner meeting of the club last
night at the Friendly Cafeteria.
The board also recommended
that the Scout troop be presented
a flag at the October meeting of
the Jayceettes.
Plans were made to encourage
the members to attend the meeting,
and an “absenteeism” committee
was appointed.
The members agreed to decorate
a float for the September 26
football parade, which will be
sponsored by the Junior Chamber
of Commerce.
ABC PROFITS SPLIT
FOUR WAYS AMONG
CITIES AND COUNTY
A four-way split in the $110,000
profits of the county ABC stores
was announced yesterday by W.
D. MacMillan, chairman of the
ABC county board.
MacMillan s%id that the money
was divided with Wilmngton get
tng $50,000; county $30,000; Caro
lina Beach, $20,000; and Wrights
ville Beach $10,000
The profits are disbursed at no
specific time, McMillian said, and
only when the board finds it has
a fair accumulated amount of mon
ey in the bank.
SUPPLY OF MEDALS
Officials of the U. S. Coast
Guard Recruiting Office in the
Custom House building emphasized
yesterday that they had an ample
supply of World War II Victory
Medalr rind Defense Medals for
former members of the Coast
Guard.
The officials said that the form
er members would onl/T'"'’
be honorably discharLav» V
-__Dm
Bows on the left side w
hats are a survival of *
days when plumes we-e ,
to give freedom of vision
tion m sword play. an<1 *t
DiajWSll For Newspan,, . ,
!
Sufferers of stomach ailmInts
WEAK KIDNEyS, RHEUMATIC PAINS
ARTHRITIS. NEURITIS
And other disorder*, such as Headaches, Indigestion, Acldi, Totu. I
Bloating, Weak Back, Frequent Rising at Night, Lumbago “• I
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Wonder Minerals
FOR THOUSANDS of years
■offerers, on advice of doctors,
go to mineral springs to get
cure, or relief. The late Presi
dent Roosevelt used to go to
Mineral Springs In Georgia. He
was helped or would not have
gone there twice a year.
WE HAVE all heard of the
miraculous springs of Uourdes,
France, and famous Thronlou In
ancient Greece, where, accord
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youth, drank Ito waters and
bathed to be forever young.
IF YOU ARE a sufferer, and
can not go to the mineral
springs, try GEO-MINERAL
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Amazing Results
WATCH your elimination*
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WHEN the poisons are ont of
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Nature starting to complete the
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Our Guarantee
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Colon Illustrations j
THE COLON la one of the ran.*
Important organs of on? S?
The following illu«irati„n, ,b *
the colon In rariouA forma w
one’s condition in l.cnlth b,»t
I™ mar »»k< Ho" '»«r coioVt
THE IDEAL COLON. A person lg
perfect health possesses a colon ltkg
this—firm and regular, with wdl
functioning muscle.
CONSTIPATION is the cause ot this
atonic abnormal condition of this
colon. IMPORTANT: Keep eoloi
free from poisonous waste mattei.
i ■ >X. > sT.*- < v.i
SPASTIC CONSTIPATION—Pinch,
ing down of the descending colon.
This condition often canted by onr
use of harsh cathartics, physlci,
GEO-MINERAL Retail Price
1 Bottle $1-10 6 Bottles *6.M
Wilmington SAUNDERS DRUG STORE
At • • • •
__MAIL ORDERS TO ABOVEV ADDRESS
THERE IS MORE ON
THE WAY TO YOU
PLEASE return ** * - , '
"Hnpty bottles promptly Ask for it either way. •. both
trade-marks mean the same thing.
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY IY
_WILMINGTON COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. ^

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