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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, September 07, 1947, SECTION A, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-09-07/ed-1/seq-12/

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FELLER WINS 18TH
FROM WHITE SOX
CHICAGO, Sept. 6. _ (JP) — The
Cleveland Indians defeated the
Chicago White Sox, 6 V) 4. today
for Bob Feller’s 18th victory, but
■the fast-baller was withdrawn in
the ninth after sporadic wildness.
Bob Lemon, who followed Ed
Klieman in relieving Feller,
struck out Rudy York and threw
out Dave Philley after the White
Sox had scored one run and load
ed the bases with only one out.
Feller allowed seven hits, walk
ed five, struck out five and hit
two batters before retiring after
facing two batters in the ninth.
Klieman got Don Kolloway on a
force play roller then pitched
singles to Ralph Hodgin and Taft
Wright for Chicago’s fourth run
before Lemon came in.
Ken Keltner’s 11th home run of
the season opened Cleveland’s
four run seventh when starter
b'rank Papish was chased. Papish
walked George Metkovich after
loading the bases to force in
Cleveland’s second r u n. Hank
singled f°r two more as Papish
retired. Pete Gebrian and Earl
Caldwell finished for Chicago.
CLEVELAND AB R H O A
Klitchell, If - 5 113 0
Rletkovich, cf - 3 2 2 6 0
Edwards, rf _ 5 0 10 0
Boudreau,, ss - 5 0 2 3 1
Fleming, lb - 5 0 14 1
Ifeltner, 3b _ 3 110 2
Cordon, 2b- 3 12 4 4
Began, c _ 4 0 0 6 1
Keller, p- 2 10 11
K Hainan, P - 0 0 0 0 0
^cinon, p - 0 0 0 0 1
TOTALS _ 35 6 10 27 11 I
CHICAGO AB R H O A
fcolloway, 2b - 5 0 0 0 2
Hodgin, If - 5 0 2 5 0
ivright, rfv?- 4 13 11
fork, lb _ 5 0 0 10 0
philley. cf - 4 12 5 0
Appling, ss- 2 0 10 2
Baker. 3b - 4 0 0 2 2
fresh, c _ 2 0 13 0
^Kennedy — 0 10 0 0
Dickey, c - 0 10 10
p£ pish, p - 2 0 0 0 3
D’Brian, p - 0 0 0 0 0
tzTucker-- 1 0 0 0 0
Caldwell, p - 0 0 0 0 0
fczzWallaesa-- 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS _ 34 4 9 27 10
z—Ran for Tresh in 7th.
*z—Flied out for Gebrian in 7th.
tzz—Hit by pitcher for Caldwell in 9th.
CLEVELAND '__ 000 001 401—6
pHICAGO _010 001 101—4
Error: fiegan. Runs batted in: Tresh,
So udreau 2, Keltnei, Metkovich, Edwards
Wright, Hodgin. Two base hits: Gor
ton, Metkovich. Home run: Keltner.
Jtolen base: Metkovich. Sacrifices: Fell
er. Keltner. Double plays: Wright and
fresh: Keytner, Gordon and Fleming.
Left on bases: Cleveland 3; Chicago 10.
Bases on balls: Feller 5. Papish 3, Cald
well 1. Strikeouts: Feller 5, Lemon 1,
papish 1, Caldwell 1. Kits: off Papish 7
pi 6 1-3 innings: Gebrian 0 in 2-3; Cald
vell 3 in 2; Feller i in 2 (faced 2 bat
|ers in 9th); Klieman 2 in 1-3; Lemon 0
fi 2-3. Hit by pitcher: by Feller (Tresh
jnd Wallaesa) Passed ball: Hegan. Win
papish. Umpires: Hubbard, Berry and
ling pitcher: Feller. Losing pitcher:
Weafer. Time: 2:27. Attendanace: 5,32G.
ROOM BENGAL
BLANKS BROWNS
DETROIT, Sept 6. — Iff} Youth
ful Art Houteman, the Detroit
tigers’ 20 - year - old lighthander,
jiurled a. masterful three-hit shut
out, facing only 30 batsmen—three
r.ore than the minimum—to whip
Ihe St. Louis Browns today, 2 to
>. with the aid of catcher Bob
fwif't’s first home run of the sea
son.
Only four men reached first
fase off Houtteman, including one
in an error and another on a
thcap infield hit, and only one
(t. Louis base-runner touched sec
ond.
Meanwhile Houtteman, h>mself,
follected two of Detroit’s seven
kits off southpaw Sam Zoldak,
Irivir.'g in one of the runs with a
two-bagger. Walter (Hoot) Evers
elped himself to a perfect day
ft bat off Zoldak with a double
ind two singles and scored the
figers’ second run.
St. Louis avoided further dam
age by negotiating five double
Ilays, two short of the American
league record.
T. LOUS AB R H O A
illinger, 3b - 4 0 0 0 0
farilla, rf _ 4 0 2 1 0
ichner, cf_ 4 0 0 3 0
itephens, as- 3 0 0 5 5
lerardino, 2b _ 3 0 0 5 1
fudnich, lb _ 3 0 0 9 2
parly, c-—- 2 0 0 1 1
SSchultz „ - 1 0 0 0 0 ’
tons, c - 0 0 0 0 0
oldak, p - 2 0 0 0 2
txColeman __ _ 1 0 0 0 0
TOTALS - 30 0 3 24 11
3:—Popped for Early in 8th.
tx—Grounded out for Zoldak in 9th.
iETROT AB R H |0 A
fake, as - 2 0 14 4
Kayo, 2b - _ 4 0 0 0 5
yertz. If _ 3 0 0 3 0
Outlaw, rf „ _- 3 0 0 2 0
tell, 3b - 3 0 0 0 3
fcvers, cf . —31320
fcullenbine, lb _ . 2 0 0 15 0
Iwift, c __ _ 2 1111
poutteman, p _ 3 0 2 0 2
TOTALS _ . 23 2 7 27 15
T. LOUIS _ 000 000 000—0
>ETROIT _001 000 Olx—2
Error- Houtteman. Runs batted in:
Iwift, Houtteman. Two base hits: Evers,
koutteman. Home run: Swift. Sacrifice:
pullenbine. Double plays:: Judnich fun
iRsigherU: Stephens, Berardino and Jud
kfch: Judnich and Stephens; Judnich,
Stephens and Judnich; Mayo. Lake and
pullenbine. Left on bases: St. Louis 3.
betroit 3. Bases on balls: Zoldak 3.
Strikeouts: Zoldak 1, Houtteman 2. Um
pires: Rue, Paparella and Summers
Pjrra:* • 1:30. Attendanace: 14,905.
Some fine oils which tanners
|se in lubricating <=ole leather, to
increase its water-resistance and
flexibility, cost more than butter.
Special Notice!
Beginning Today and Continuing Each Sunday
Wc Will Be Open
From 8:30 A. N. till 10:30 P. N.
OFFERING COMPLETE
0DA FOUNTAIN SERVICE
— Also Specializing In —
# STEAK • CHICKEN • CHOPS
Jiffy Grill
Cor. 2nd & Chestnut Sts. Opposite Cape Fear Hotel
Phone 2-1952
> I....
I, The Hat Goes Into His Act •
Harry Walker’s cap routine earned him the nickname, The Hat, requires 12 seconds. The major
leagues’ leading batter first tips his hat. Bat resting against his legs, the Phillies’ center fielder rubs
his hands while scanning the defense. Removing his lid, Dixie’s kid brother wipes his brow, first
with one sleeve, then the other. Cap on head, the former Cardinal blows into his right hand and is
ready to take the cut that makes him a .350 hitter..
Hit A Home Run And Get Merchandise
As Baseball Goes More County Fair
-* _ . ~ ^ ...
YANKS LOSE 3RD
IN ROW TO NATS
WASHINGTON, Sept. 6,W' —The
New York Yankees equalled their
season’s longest losing streak
when they dropped their third
straight to Washington today, 9-6
using five pitchers in an attempt,
to halt the Senaors’ 12-single at
tack.
Early Wynn hung up his 15th
win but he was roughed up in the
seventh when the Yankees scored
four times and Milo Candini was
rushed to the rescue.
It was the fifth loss in seven
September games for the Yankees
who appear to be backing into the
American League pennant. They
lead runnerup Boston by 11 games
with 19 to play.
Karl Drews, the loser. Bill
Bevens, Don Johnson, R a nd y
Gumpert and rookie Dick Starr
saw action as Manager Bucky
Harris dug deep into his barrel
of reserve pitchers in search of
a stopper. The Yanks have used
51 pitchers in their last 22 games.
Drews was wild and was batted
out in the third when the Senators
had opened up a 5-0 lead. It never
was close with first baseman
Mickey Vernon batting in four
runs. Jerry Priddy and Sherry
Robertson each knocked in two
and Eddie Yost, who has yet to
make a hit in the series, scored
three times. He was hit by a
pitched ball, walked and had a
life on George McQuinn’s error on
his sacrifice.
NEW YORK AB R II O A
Stirn weiss, 2b - 5 0 13 2
Henrich, rf - 5 0 0 6 0
Lindell. If - 5 2 2 1 0
DiMaggio, cf- 4 12 10
McQuinn, lb _ 5 2 17 3
W. Johnson, 3b - 5 0 2 0 4
Robinson, c - 5 113 0
Rizzuto, ss _ 4 0 3 2 1
Drews, p _ 1 0 0 0 1
Bevens, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
D. Johnson, p- 0 0 0 0 0
Gumpert, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
Starr, p ___ 0 0 0 1 0
xBrown__ 10 10 0
xxFrey „ _ 1 0 0 0 0
xxxClark __ _ 10 10 0
xxxxPhillips__ 1 0 0 0 0
TOTALS _ 42 6 14 24 11
x—Singled for Bevens in 4th.
xx—Flied out for D. Johnson in 6th.
xxx—Singled for Gumpert in 7th.
xxxx—Struck out for Starr in 9th.
WASHINGTON AB R H O A
Yost, 3b _ 1 3 0 0 1
| Lewis, rf - 3 3 15 0
Robertson, If_ 4 13 3 0
Vernon, lb- 5 12 3 0
Spence, cf ___ 5 0 15 0
Priddy, 2b_ 5 0 0 1 1
Mancuso, c _ 4 0 14 0
Sullivan, ss _ 3 0 2 6 0
Wynn, p _ 3 12 0 3
Candini, p _ 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS _ 22 9 12 27 5
NEW YORK __ _ 000 100 410—6
WASHINGTON _ 203 013 OOx—9
Errors: McQuinn, Priddy. Runs batted
in: Vernon 3, Robertson 2, Spence, Prid
dy 2, Brown, Mancuso, W. Johnson 2,
Rizzuto. Clark. Two base hit: Lindell.
Sacrifices: Robertson, Yost 2, Lewis,
Candini. Double play: Rizzuto, Stirn
weises and McQuinn. Left on bases: New
York 14; Washington 8. Base on balls:
off Drews 3, Wynn 1, Candini 3. Strike
outs: Drews 3. Wynn 1; Candidi 3. Hits:
off Drews 4 in 2 1-3 innings; Bevens 0
in 2-3. D. Johnson 4 in 2; Gumpert 2 in
1; Starr 2 in 2; Wynn 12 in 6 2-3; Can
dini 2 in 2 1-3. Hit by pitcher: by Drews
(Yost); Wynn (W. Johnson). Winning
pitcher: Wynn. Losing pitcher: Drews.
Umpires: Grieve, McKinley, Jones and
McGowan. Time: 2:20. Attendanace: 8,
500.
MOBILE CLINCHES
SOUTHERN FLAG
MOBILE, Ala., Sept. 6.—OJ.R)
—The Mobile Bears tonight
clinched the 1947 Southern As
sociation pennant, the first
they have won in 25 years and
the second in their history,
by defeating the Chattanooga
Lookouts 6 to 0 in their next
to-last game of the season.
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK, Sept. 5.—(NEA)—
A batter belting a home run at Eb
| bets Field is handed a carton of
cigarettes by the batboy as he
crosses the plate.
This practice ha* unlimited pos
sibilities. If it keeps up, the play
ling fields will be cluttered up with
I merchandise. Baseball will more
j closely resemble a take-it-or-leave
it radio program,
j Eventually this might lead to
rules changes. Why not make the
noble athletes earn thpir gifts for
anything less than a crcuit clout?
Fix it so the runr«r will be auto
matically out if he fails to pick
up the gift as well as touch the
| base.
| Those old-fashioned firemen
| police picnics were a lot of
fun. Reach third ba«e and get
a schooner of beer. Some of the
boys ran the wrong wTay.
Automobile manufacturers
might have cars on the sidelines,
so a bloke socking the sphere out
of the lot could ride around the
bases. This would be very help
ful to larg# Johnny Mize and
most of the other Giants, espe
cially at the Polo Grounds, where
the Chinese home run practically
has the lads exhausted.
As long as baseball is going
county fair, it might as well go
all the way as the Queens
Rickey Keeps Mum
On 1948 Manager
BY HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK, Sept. 6.—(NEA).
—Asked if Leo Durocher will be
back as manager of the Dodgers
next spring, Branch Rickey says:
“Honestly, I don’t know.”
That goes for, most of major
league baseball.
There’ll be some managerial
changes, player trades.
With an ordinary club like the
current Yankees practically run
ning away and hiding at such an
early date, and maintaining a lop
sided bulge with a modicum of
pitching, how can American
League owners be satisfied?
Only two American League
pilots can said to be solidly set
—the venerable Connie Mack in
Philadelphia and Ted Lyons in
Chicago. Mack, who has had an
amazingly good year, by the way,
owns the joint. Lyons is entiled
to another whirl on old acquain
tance.
The fortunates in the National
are Billy Southworth in Boston,
Johnny Neun in Cincinnati and
Mel Ott in New York, and the
latter has been critized for early
mistakes in casting and handling
of pitching. Southworth once
more is the manager-of-the-yoer.
Neun put the breath of life back
into the Reds.
DICK MUCKERMAN called in
most of the Browns before the
kick-off, gave them what they
wanted. For that the St. Louis
Americans are 37 games out.
The ice and fuel magnate never
has sat still in business. There
is every indication that he is dis
satisfied with his organization,
so general manager Bill DeWitt
is expected to go. That would
open the way for Muddy Ruel to
step up into the front office and
popular and able Jimmy Dykes’
return to the league as manager.
There is plenty of reason to
suspect that Ossie Bluege is
through in Washington. A disas
trous season. Dissension on the
club. He took a couple of punches
SAY, MARTY-V OUST Efc THE BIGGEST HUNT | 1| r\ FOUND THAT WAS THE] \
COT MY TROPHY FROM S WAS EVER. ON ENDED AT PLACE TO TAKE MTi
THE TAy.IDELE.MIST. DON'T CAR. FOR. THE BESTJ
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Friends"
County Grand Jury suggested in
connection with off-track wager
ing.
Asked to look back through
bitter years and repeat what
phrase, if possible, reveals the
true horse players’ philosophy,
co-author Ben Sher of a new
comedy, ‘‘I Gotta Get Out,”
thought a moment and then
quoted a remark which he says
was heard at Saratoga.
‘T hope I break even today,”
he quotes a depressed sucker as
remarking to a pal, ‘‘because I
need the money.”
It is to be hopel that the gag
lines of “I Gotta Get Out” are
somewhat newer than that one
which was around when the Sara
toga track was being built with
Civil War profits.
As usual, with Paul Brown’s
teams, there are no water
buckets on the professional Cleve
land Rams’ practice field. All
players stand up unless they’re
hurt.
Frank Gatski and Chet Adams
amuse mates at night with weight
lifting feats just before bedtime.
Gr-r-r-r!
A retor has it that the Browns
released their two Negroes, infield
er Brown and outfielder Thompson,
because cf lack of attendance.
There’s one for you.
How could anyone possibly tell
when the Browns aren’t drawing?
They never have.
at a baseball writer, after which
Clark Griffith called his field
marshal home in the midst of a
western trip.
DETROIT easily could finish
second again, but there are
indications that this will not be
good enough to hold Steve O’Neill’s
job this trip.
Doc Cramer seemed to believe
he had some sort of a chance for
the job, but spoke about the op
portunity, and consequently may
have talked himself out of it.
Tom Yawkey can’t understand
why the 1946 Red Sox of the tre
mendous early foot fell so far
behind an average Yankee club
this time out. Reports have had
Joe McCarthy, Lou Boudreau and
O'Neill running the works at Fen
way Park next spring, with Joe
Cronin relieving the ailing Eddie
Collins on the business end.
BILIj VEECK denies it, of
course, but reports persist that
the progressive young president
of the Indians would prefer a
different type of manager. Char
ley Grimm, with whom he enjoy
ed so much success in Milwaukee,
would be first choice.
Appling Ties Record
In Chisox Game Today
CHICAGO, Sept. 6.—(^P)—
American League figure ex
perts decided today that Luke
Appling, veteran Chicago
White Sox shortstop, will tie
Peckinpaugh’s record of 1,985
games at shortstop when he
opposes Cleveland in a single
game here tomorrow.
The 38-year-old Appling came
up to the White Sox in 1931.
Outside of a few games at
third base Luke has devoted
the bulk of his major league
career to shortstopping.
The same basic process is used
in making both leather soles and
harness leather.
SAIN WINS 19TH
OVER PHILS, 7-4
BOSTON, Sept. 6.—(A1)—In a free
hitting contest, the last night game
of the season here, the Boston
Braves tonight made it three in
a row over the Philadelphia Phil
lies by downing the Quakers 7-4
before 27,080 fans who made the
total for 30 after dark games at
Braves field 725,871.
It was the 19th victory of the
season for Johnny Sain, the
Tribe’s All-Star right hander, who
was touched for 11 hits but kept
them scattered enough so that the
Phils were ’never able to score
more than one run at a time.
Frank (Buck) McCormick, the
Tribe’s right handed hitting first
baseman who needs to play in only
15 more games to be eligible for
the National League batting
crown, now is outhitting Harry
Walker of the Phils by two per
centage points.
Walker, the league’s leading
hitter with the necessary number
of games played, went hitless in
four trips tonight and now is bat
ting .355.
McCormick got one for three to
night and now has an average of
,357.
National League rules require
a player to be in 100 games be
fore he is eligible for the batting
title.
PHILADELPHIA AB K H O A
Lapointe, ss -!— 5 0 113
Walker, cf- 4 0 0 3 0
Ennis, If-- 5 0 0 2 0
Wyrostek, rf-— 4 3 3 0 0
Padgett, c_ 4 13 4 0
Handley, 3b - 4 0 12 0
Schultz, lb - 4 0 16 0
Verban, 2b- 3 0 16 1
Heintzelman, p _ 2 0 0 0 2
Hughes, p_ 0 0 0 0 0
xJudd__-_-—_—- 1 0 0 0 0
Cchanz, p- 0 0 0 0 3
xxGilbert —- 10 10 0
TOTALS _ 37 4 11 24 9
x—Grounded out for Hughes in 6th.
xx—Singled for Schanz in 9th.
BOSTON AB R H O A
Holmes, rf _ 5 13 2 0
M. McCormick, cf-l£ _ 4 0 0 3 0
Rowell, If_ _ 1 0 0 0 0
Litwhiler, if ...4 1110
Hopp, cf_ 10 0 10
Elliott, 3b _ 2 112 2
F. McCormick, lb_ 3 117 1
Torgeson, lb_ 10 0 10
Masi, c_ 4 13 4 0
Ryan, 2b _ 4 114 3
Culler, ss _ 4 12 2 1
Sain, p- 4 0 10 4
TOTALS _ 37 7 13 27 11
PHILADELPHIA _ 010 101 010—4
BOSTON _ 210 030 Olx—7
Errors: Handley, Walker, Schultz.
Runs batted in: Padgett 2, Handley,
Schultz, F. McCormick 2, Masi 2, Sain 2.
Sain 2. Two base hits: Padgett, Wyros
tek, Schultz, F. McCormick, Elliott, Cul
ler. Three base hits: Wyrostek. Stolen
bases: Verban. Double plays: Schanz to
Verban to Lapointe; to Schultz; Sain to
F. McCormick to Elliott. Left on bases:
Philadelphia 8; Boston 8. Bases c:i balls:
off Heintzelman 2, oft Sain 2. Strikeouts:
by Heintzelman 3, by Schanz 1, by Sain
3- Hits: off Heintzelman 10 in 4 in-(
nings, none out in 5th; off Hughes 0 in
1 inning; off Schanz 3 in 3 innings. Wild
pitch: Heintzelman. Passed ball: Padgett.
Losing pitcher: Heintzelman. Umpires:
Robb, Gore and Pinelli. Time: 1:57. At
tendanace: 27,080.
FAIN SUSPENDED
BY LEAGUE BOSS
--
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 6 —(U.R)—
President Will Harridge of the
American League today indef
initely suspended Ferris Fain, the
Philadelphia Athletics’ rookie first
baseman, for punching Eddie Pel
lagrini of the Boston Red Sox dur
ing last night’s game.
The altercation took place in the
seventh inning of the A’s 9 to 7
victory over Boston, after Fain
had scored on a double by Buddy
Rosar.
Fain, who charged that Pella
grini had blocked the base path
as he streaked for third, ran back
to the base after crossing the
plate and began throwing punches
at the Red Sox infielder. Umpires
and players separated the pair be
fore any damage was done and
Fain was banished from the game
by Umpire Ed Rommel.
For Newspaper Service Dial 2-3311
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! No Gain By The Giants Blanchard Stnn,^ ^ I
aying with the Eastern College All-Stars, is stopped FELIX “DOC” BLANCHARn I
ants on the All-Stars’ 25t- yard stripe in the firs for no gain by End Ray Poole of tl,* vlmv,.star Pi ■
York. At left is Howie Livingston, Giant back, quarter of the game at the Polo r-A/j 'nrk Gi B
(AP Wirephoto). The Giants won 21 to 0. rilnds >n Xe» B
SA STARS READY
FOR MAJORS TRIAL
ATLANTA, Ga„ Sept. 6. — "J.R)—
The Southern Association battled
down the home stretch last week
with the pennant still in doubt but
consignment tags to the major
leagues were already attached to
some of the choicest players in
the loop.
Big Ted Yluszewski, who clinch
ed his second straight batting
crown in two years of organized
baseball was on his way from the
Memphis Chicks to a first base
position with the Cincinnati Reds.
Klu, who won the Sally League
title last year with the Columbia
Reds, was far ahead of his near
est rival in the Southern chase,
boasting a .382 mark.
On Kluszewski’s heels were
third baseman Cy Block of the
Nashville Vols and Rookie Hal
Jeffcoat, Vol centerfielder, both of
whom wore Chicago Cub labels.
Mickey Rutner, Birmingham
Baron third sacker, followed with
.345, and Gil Coan, another crack
at the Washington Senator outer
garden assured, followed with
.342.
Block paced the field m doubles
with 50; Jeff coat led in total hits
with 213 in games through Wed
nesday. Al Flair, New Orleans
first-baseman, led in home runs
with 24 and in runs batted in
with 126. Coan sewed up the stolen
base title with 41 pilfered sacks.
PACES BULLDOGS
ATHENS, Ga., Sept. 6—OJ.P.)—
Sonny Lloyd, 24-year-old Blythe
Ville, Ark., tailback was a shining
light in the scrimmage of the
Georgia Bulldogs today pacing the
ball-carrying efforts of Bulldog
backs like an All-American.
INJURED LIST GROWS
LEXINGTON, Va., Sept. 6—GP>
—No less than six members of the
Virginia Military Institute football
squad were in the hospital today
as the team’s injured and sick list
grew and dampened the spirits of
the Keydet coaching staff.
✓Authorized
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GUARDS POWERFUL
WAKE FOREST, Sept. 5—
Wake Forest’s supporters rank
their two starting gjiards, Bob
Leonetti and Ed Royston, with
the best in the nation. Leonetti
and Royston received lavish
praise for their brilliant all
round play in the sterling up
set victories over Boston Col
lege and Tennessee last year.
The two are playing their last
season this fall and are al
ready being tabbed .for All
America.
WHO WOULDN’T BE?
Tuscaloosa, Ala., s»pt ( ,
—Coach Red Drew said he '*
“well pleased" today *
first team backfield 'of o,L '
back Bob Cochran. halfhyyZ."
ryJ<'d??er Bob CadevZ
and fullback Lowell Tew C .
Alabama Crimson Tide.
Leaves on cut flower ... if
which are below the •’•aie-’:'B
make ideal nesting place,
bacteria. Strip them off
placing the flowers in a vase ■
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12-Ga. Light Load
12-Ga. Max. Load
16 ga. Light load
16 ga. Max. load
20 ga. Light load
20 ga. Max. load
22 CAL. CARTRIDGES
SHORTS — LONG — LONG BU LK
Smooth Elgin
Outboard Motor
21/2 H. P. Motor
829i
10.00 Down
Bal. Nonihly
Just what you’ll need for 5oU‘
boating pleasure. 2.5 Horsepo"
er Elgin motor is right up to
the minute in speed, perform
ance and smooth operati011.
Moves good size boat 6-7 ni-P--'
See one now. You’ll like at1 "
features.
TSa&fa&tKfHatartU* "’foe gettH
iHSHty/ac*.' j[f||%J PaymentPh*H
307 No. Front St. Wilmington, N. C. Dial 2-2621

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