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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, October 02, 1947, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-10-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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Robinson Held In Death
Of Preacher’s Wife Here
-A six-man coroner’s jury de
Ji®rated only two minutes at
the- courthouse last night before
reaching the conclusion that Al
nS Lewis, 33-year-old Negro
pecacher’s wife, came to her
dfTfth “by blows administered
bjET James Robinson.”
-He is being held in jail under
$8300 bond.
-Br. A. H. Elliot told the jury
ttfgft he performed an autopsy
Ofb-the woman’s body and said
iibsrt In his opinion she died as
aj-esult of hemmorrhage in the
bssan induced by a succession
©t" blows about the head and
He said there was no evi
dmce that a sharp cornered in
strument had been used. No
fcSctured bones were discover
ed*- he said.
3}etective M. M. Jeffords told
Hw jury that police were sum
aflgied to the 33-year-old Ro'oin
mna.’n residence at 1125 South
fHnth street at around 7:45 a.m
September 30 by Dr. H. W. Huf
nan, whom Robinson had
ceiled to attend Alma. The doc
tor. reported that the woman
vh dead when he arrived at
Dnr house.
jleffords, testifying that Rob
teeen was “very cooperative”
UiTteconstructing the crime for
■to* officers, said that the Negro
told him that a violent fight
a “jealous argument” had
started between Alma and him
after he had returned to his
fciQOie from a dance “at the
B~n.”
The detective testified that
the. 125-pound Robinson had told
him that he had slapped the
wean an about the face and head
with his fist, but remembered
using no weapon. He quoted the
N£gro as saying he had “no
idea of killing her," and that he
<Jld not realize that she was
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— Wilmington, N. C.
dead when he called the doctor.
According to Jeffords, Robin
son told him that he had let
Alma into his home earlier in
the evening at her insistance
and said that she was accompa
nied by her six-year-old son,
Edmund, at the time. He told
the detective that he returned
to the house later with one Na
than Willis of Armour, whom
he said he left in the house
when he returned to the dance.
Willis, Jeffords said, said yes
terday that he returned to the
dance with Robinson and said
that he noted no evidence of
any trouble at that time.
Robinson was reported as
having told the officers that he
had been “dating” Alma since
the first of the year and had
been intimate with her a num
ber of times.
Time of the death of Alma
was set by the coroner and doc
tors present as around 5 or 6
o’clock in the morning.
Members of the jury were
Foreman Tom Lawther, Secre
tary Henry Kermon, J. A. Chas
ten, Jesse Marshall, G. T. Wil
liamson and Ronald Eakins.
TRUMAN ASKS
(Continued From Page One)
‘fewer slices of bread” on the
table, mostly by feeding less
grain to livestock.
The committee heard him and
went to work.
While it is considering recom
mending “meatless days” and
less grain for making liquor,
Luckman told a news confer
ence, right now it is asking the
American people to:
“1. Buy the cheaper cuts. If
we insist on fancy steaks we
lose two ways: sorely needed
wheat is used to fatten cattle for
the choice cuts; you pay higher
and higher prices.
“2. Don’t serve too much.
America should continue to eat
the meat it really needs. But
not extravagantly. Serve your
family’s plates in the kitch
en. Pile on a little less;
don’t urge ‘seconds.’
“3. Don’t overcook meat.
Roasts, chops . . . almost all
meat shrinks when you cook it
too much. You lose money and
America loses food needed to
save for the hungry.
“4, Use leftovers. Home made
hash, stews, soups, stuffed to
matoes. . . every housewife
knows dozens of ways to use
leftovers. Save meat, save
money.
“5. Save wheat other ways.
Supplies in poultry and eggs,
of butter and cheese, also de
pend in part on the feeding of
grains. Use them wisely and
sparingly, too, so that we can
save wheat to fight hunger over
there.”
Marshall summed it all up in
a statement in six words:
.‘Buy wisely, eat sensibly,
waste nothing.”
What the program is aimed
at is saving enough food in this
country to prevent what Luck
man called a “winter of want
and hunger” in Europe, which
is short not only on food but on
j American dollars to buy it.
Congress comes in on the
money end of it. Mr. Truman
says it will have to supply cash
as gifts or loans because gov
ernment agencies will be un
able to help out beyond Decem
ber—“if as long as that.”
GEORGIAN
(Continued From Page One)
by the House Foreign Affairs
committee and the Senate For
eign Relations committee which
he said was due to meet
about Nov. 10. But he doubt
ed whether the Republican ma
jority in congress could be
counted on for anything further
than foreign aid, particularly
any program having to do with
wages and prices, at the ex
traordinary session.
He said that even with the
new foreign aid proposals he
thought income taxes could be
reduced “reasonably.”
(rood Mowing!
Choose
Stromherg
Carlson
For The Finest
In Musical
Reproduction
AT
GREGG
BROS. ,
110 Market St.
Dial 9655
viWANIANS HEAR
(Continued From Page One)
Bavaria (U. S. zone) and wines
and lumber from the south and
southwest (French zone) were
the products to be distributed.
Hughes lauded American in
genuity in clearing the U. S.
section of the Rhine of nine col
lapsed steel bridges, starting
the job with only one large
crane and having only four
months for the job. The engi
neers, using German labor, con
structed a crane for each bridge
and completed the impossible
job in three months.
Tonnage Raised
“With much help from the
Americans,” he said, “the Ger
mans were able to raise river
tonnage from 12,000 tons in Oc
tober 1945 to 400,000 tons in
June 1946, consisting mostly of
coal up the river and pit props
or mine timbers downstream.”
After completing the river
job, he said, the engineers turn
ed to the railroad problenn. Dis
cussing the great difficulties un
der which they labored, he de
clared, “Coincident with the as
sumption of responsibilities, de
nazification started and over
night we would find a welder
become a shop superintendent,
with 90 per cent of the office
force or shop force discharged
for Nazi affiliation. Working un
der these difficulties was rather
heartbreaking.”
Paying tribute to “a handful
of American men and women,
who were willing to work seven
days a week to see that Ger
many was allowed to rebuild
her transport along peaceful
lines,” he said that the job was
accomplished. “By June, 95 per
cent of the trackage in the
American zone was back in use,
the port capacity of Bremen
was up to 23,000 tons a day,
and we were handling an aver
age of 15,000 tons a day. Car
repairs had jumped to 700 a
week and car loadings to 150,
000 tons a day. . .”
Nominee List
Reelection of George D. Co
nant to the presidency of the
club was virtually assured fol
lowing withdrawl from the race
by Thomas U. Wright after
nominating committee chair
man Horace King presented the
qualified slate of nominees for
approval.
Other nominees were as fol
lows:
Vice president, William Court
ney, B. B. Cameron; treasurer,
Walter B. Freed; directors, L.
A. Raney, E. S. Capps, W. S.
Evans, Jr., James A. Scott,
John H. Farrell, Dr. W. S
Dosher, Neil Bolton, C. S. Cur
rin and J. W. Stewart.
Guests of the club for lunch
eon were E. J. Weeks, new
manager of Lake Village unit
of housing authority of the city
of Wilmington; Ernest Van Me
ter, Martinsburg, W. Va.. Ham
ilton E. Hicks and Col. Hughes.
US. REESTABLISHES
(Continued From Page One)
protests from both the United
States and Britain. His convic
tion was denounced as a tra
vesty on justice.
In Sofia today, three Ameri
can Congressmen laid a great
wreath on Petkov’s unmarked
grave in tribute to “one of the
greatest democrats of all time.”
No the three, identified by a
reliable informant as Senator
Hatch (D-NM), Rep. Lodge (R
Conn) and Rep. Judd (R-Minn),
evidently acted without know
ledge of Bulgarian authorities.
They left for Istanbul, Turkey,
after the wreath-laying.
In a neighboring Balkan coun
try, meanwhile, United States
policies were denounced by
Marshal Tito, Yugoslavia’s pre
mier. He said the Truman doc
trine aims at creating bases for
“encirclement of the Soviet Un
ion and other generally demo
cratic Eastern states.” Ameri
cans and British are behind
Greece’s troubles, he said in a
speech to Yugoslav veterans.
He told them to. be “prepared
at all times.”
Lovett announced that Presi
dent Truman has named Donald
R. Heath, 53-year-old State De
partment career officer, as min
ister to Bulgaria. Heath is cur
rently counselor to the Ameri
can clerical representative in
Berlin.
The Weather
Weather bureau report of temperature
and rainfall for the 24 hours ending 8
p. m., in the principal cotton growing
areas and elsewhere:
Station High Low Preclp.
WILMINGTON - 64 46 —
Alpena - 58 31
Asheville - 96 *2
Atlanta - 64 54
Atlantic City- 91 37 —
Birmingham- 79 46 —
Boston - 59 38 —
Buffalo- 53 34 —
Burlington - 51 33 —
Charlotte - 62 43 —
Chattanooga -- 72 50 —
Chicago - 62 34 —
Cincinnati - 60 35 —
Cleveland - 61 34 —
Dallas - 82 81 —
Denver- 82 45 —
Detroit_ 58 31 —
Duluth _ 55 30 —
El Paso _ 85 58 —
Fort Worth_ 84 60 —
Galveston _ 79 08 —
Houston - 82 61 —
Jacksonville-_ 76 58 .04
Kansas City - 70 50 .02
Key West_ 81 75 .05
Knoxville _ 68 43 —
Little Rock,.- 71 47 —
Los Angeles_ 78 50 —
Louisville - 64 36 —
Memphis _ 74 44 —
Meridian _ 81 51 —
Miami _ 83 71 ' .72
Minn.-St. Paul _ 59 38 —
Mobile _ 83 57 —
Montgomery _ 84 53 —
New Orleans_ 79 65 —
New York _ 60 39 —
Norfolk _ 56 46 —
Philadelphia - 61 34 —
Phoenix _100 67 —
Pittsburgh . - 58 31 —
Portland, Me. - 58 32 —
Raleigh _ '62 39 —
Richmond- 60 35 —
St. Louis _ 58 45 —
San Antonio^- 87 51 —
San Francisco- 69 59 —
Savannah _•- 67 59 —
Seattle- 71 57 t—
Tampa ———- 83 68 —
Vicksburg - 77 46 —
Washington - 60 38 —
Spinning is one of th« aidMt
of metal making processes.
Believe/t oriVbt/ »l%H
UCUTENANT^ __
COLONEL ^Snr^
MAJOR -I08t-SF.A.-U.$.ARMY
IMPOUND GASP .
CAUGHT 6V ITS FIN/
by no«»v»h Paul
G Hi wo id. Iowa
A CHUNK Of COPPER
THE SIZE Of A BASEBALL
CAN BE PRAWN
•j INTO A WIRE
p" 274 MILES LONG
a
T0HNGBEl6.Tr
Owner of
Exactcenter
THE EXACT GEOGRAPHIC CENTER of the UNITED STATES (UT 39-50 -Lond. 98-55)
C»r* K>* l««*u *«•>•»* **<IJ •*!<« °
Radio Stations Not Taxable
By Cities, Says McMullan
RALEIGH, Oct. 1. —OT— A
municipality may not legally im
pose a license or privilege tax on
radio broadcasting stations "as
such would be a direct tax on in
terstate commerce and conse
quently unconstitutional,” At
torney General Harry McMullan
ruled in a list of opinions releas
ed today.
Other rulings:
The Department of Conserva
tion and Development is authoriz
ed to impose reasonable charges
and collect reasonable fees for
the use of the services, privileges
and facilities of state-owned
lakes, including fees for the is
suance of fishing permits.
“Our statutes require all state
and local law enforcement of
ficers, on seizing vehicles because
of the unlawful transportation of
intoxicating beverages therein,
or on making arrests of persons
on account of the same, to refer
the case to the state court having
jurisdiction; and further, it is a
misdemeanor for any such of
ficer to refer any such case to a
federal court.
“In cases where a clerk of the
Superior Court has received from
an executor, administrator or col
lector any funds due a missing
person who has not been heard
of for seven years or more, the
clerk is authorized by statute to
distribute such funds among the
next of kin of the missing per
son, in the manner set out in the
statute.
“Under our statutes, a city or
town may levy a license tax not
in excess of $50.00 on chain or
branch stores as such, but this
limitation does not prevent such
city or town from imposing upon
such stores an additional mer
chants license tax to be collected
from merchants generally.
“In cases where students who
live outside a special tax school
district are charged tuition on
that account, the parent or per
son standing in the place of par
ent is entitled to credit on such
tuition account to the extent of
such special district school taxes
as he has paid on property own
ed and listed by him within the
district.
HUNDREDS DEAD
(Continued From Page One)
critically injured, the reports
said. Charmeh, 30 miles from
Ferdows, reported eight persons
dead, 30 injured.
A government official said
these first reports were not
complete. Many villages, he
said, have no telegraphic com
munication to even nearby
cities.
The government and the Iran
ian Red Lion and Sun, (Red
Cross) took immediate action
to relieve the striken area. The
council of ministers met n an
emergency session last night
and voted funds for relief.
A British subject who came to
the United States and was nat
uralized, and then returned to
England, could again become a
British subject after a residence
there of five years.
ANGUILA WARDEN
(Continued From Page One)
which had been considering evi
dence in the case since Mon
day. Federal Attorney J. Sax
ton Daniel presented the evi
dence.
The five men were charged
with violating chapter 18, sec
tion 52 of the United States code
relating to rights, privileges
and immunit i e s, populrly
known as the civil rights of civ
il liberties section. The men had
not yet been arrested and de
tails of their bond and trial
plans had not been worked out.
The Anguila riot occurred in
the stockade of the big state
camp near Brunswick after an
alleged sit-down strike by Ne
gro members of a road gang.
Six Negroes were killed outright
in the shooting and two others
died later.
A state grand jury which in
vestigated the case failed to re
turn indictments and Daniel un
dertook an investigation to de
termine whether the federal
civil liberties statue had been
violated.
As an aftermath of the riot,
the state ordered • the Anguilr
camp and the other remaining
state labor camp, in Charlton
county, abolished.
SENATOR UMSTEAD
TO ADDRESS COUNTY
FARMERS TONIGHT
Senator William B. Umstead
will address New Hanover county
farmers tonight at 7:30 o’clock
at their monthly supper meeting
in the Wrightsboro Clubhouse, it
was anounced yesterday by R.
W. Galphin, New Hanover county
farm agent.
The North Carolina senator
will arrive in Wilmington early
today and a large crowd is ex
pected to hear him speak.
Senator Umstead will visit
Masonboro Inlet and Myrtle
Grove Sound during the day.
Later in the afternoon he will
review the facilities of Wilming
ton’s ports.
NEW VICE PRESIDENTS
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J„ Oct.
1. (/P) — The executive council
of the American Bankers as
sociation in a post convention
meeting today elected new
vice presidents for the 48 states
and the district of Columbia. The
new vice presidents include:
North Carolina, George R. Dupny
of Durham; South Carolina, J.
B. Gambrell of Greenwood.
ONE KILLED, 63 HURT
WARSAW, Oct. 1. — VP) —One
militiaman was killed and 63
persons were injured in a free-for
all fight after a soccer match at
Sonsnowiecz in southern Poland.
The crowd, disagreeing with one
judge’s rulings, attempted to
lynch him. Hurriedly called fire
men used hoses to aid the militia
men break up the brawl.
The modern type of sealing
wax contains no wax, according
to the Encyclopedia Britannica.
STAR GAZER'
ARIES
L Mar. 22
I Apr. 20
16-30-34-50
54-78 .
TAURUS
| Apr. 21
■ May 21
1- 8- 9-27
46-51-62
GEMINI
| May 22
* June 22
49-52-53-55
71-73-75
* CANCER
£ June 2j
** July 23
5- 7-20-25
28-41-45.
LEO
k, July 24
1 Aug. 23
10-12-15-351
66- 69
» VIRGO
J Aug: 24
M Sept. 22
2- 13-40-61
67- 72
--By CLAY R. POLLAN
•To develop message for Thursday,
read words corresponding to num
bers of your Zodiac birth sign.
1 This
2 Avoid
3 Be
4 Cooperation
6 Best
6 Diplomatic
1 For
8 Is
9 Your
10 Meet
11 Is
12 Your
13 Fatigtie.
14 Your
16 Duties
18 Take
17 Only
18 Make
19 With
20 Sociability
21 A
22 Your
23 Change
24 Associates
25 Parties
26 In
27 Day
28 New
29 Avoid
30 Trips
31 Your
3-i Disputes
33 Personal
34 Make
35 Cheerfully
36 Way
37 Forget
38 Schedule
89 Hunches
40 Don't
41 Contact*
42 Consider
43 Here
44 Interests
45 Friendship*
40 Use
47 May
48 Put
49 Entertain
CO Visits
51 It
52 Visit
63 Shop
64 To
65 See
66 Tour
67 Only
58 Be
69 Advanced
60 Plans
61 Seek
<2 Advantageously
63 Or
64 Actual
65 Ideas
66 Be
67 The
68 Into
69 Diligent
70 Through
71 Beauticians
72 Limelight
73 Close
74 Action
75 Friends
76 Sociability
77 Possibilities
78 Friends
Good 0 Advero. Nsutral
(Released by The Bell Syndicate. Ine. 10/2
libra
Sept. 23 /
Oct. 23 4*
33-44-47-53 <
59-70-76
SCORPIO j
Oct. 24 '4
Nov. 22 >
37-39-42-57.
64- 77
SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23 7
Dee. 22 '
18-21-23-26. |
31-38 ’
CAPRICORN
Dee. 23 4
Jan. 20
4-11.14-17,
36-43 1
AQUARIUS
Jan.21
Feb. 19
3- 6-19-22 ,
24-29-32 '
PISCES
Feb. 20
Mar. 21 S
48-56-60-63 i
65- 66-74 '
Gbitu les
LESLIE HUMMELL
Funeral services for Leslie Ft.
Hummell, 57-year-old. Wilming
ton insurance man who died Mon
day night Were held yesterday at
11 a. m. from the residence. 8
Mimosa place, with Dr. William
Crowe, Jr., officiating. Inter
ment followed in Oxford.
Active pallbearers were Will
Godwin, Dr. J. F. Robertson, P.R.
Smith, J. B. Hughes, Fred Wil
letts, Dr. D. R. Murchison, Arch
Ames and John Bright Hill.
Honorary pallbearers were
members of the Wilmington Life
Underwriters association and di
rectors of the Cooperative Build
ing and Loan Association.
MRS. MAGGIE L. COPELAND
Funeral services for Mrs.
Maggie L. Copeland, 73-year
old resident of Winter Park who
died Tuesday morning will be
held from the chapel of the Yopp
Funeral home today at 3:30 p.m,
with the Rev. Harvey W. Glazier
officiating.
Mrs. Copeland is survived by
two daughters: Mrs. O. S. Rog
ers, and Mrs. W. D. Lewis,
Wilmington; three sons: J. W.,
E. E.( and F. W. all of Wilming
ton; one sister, Mrs. C. C. Wil
son, Sr., and one brother, J. T.
Jacobs of Norfolk, Va.
Active pallbearers will be
Charley Wilson, Jr., Glenn Wil
son, O. S. Rogers, Jr., H. W. Pin
ner, E. A. Wilson, Harold Wilson,
and C. C. Wilson, Jr.
Honorary pallbearers will be
H. B. Register, J. M. Hall, Sr.,
W. R. Dosher, Dr. H. M. Pickard,
Harold Cullers, L. M. Todd, O.
D. Curtis and W. J. Hines.
PAUL KIRKHUM
Paul Kirkhum, Jr., five
months old, of 716 N. Third
street, died at 3 o’clock Tuesday
morning at the Babies Hospital
at Wrightsville Beach.
Funeral services were held
yesterday afternoon at 4 o’clock
at the home, with the Rev.
George Shepard officiating. In
terment followed in Bellevue
cemetery.
The baby is survived by his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Kirk
hum; grandparents, Mrs. Naomi
j Willis and Mrs. Deena Hull, of
! Atlanta, Ga.
Active pallbearers were
Jimmie Glissen, Harry Barnhill
Sonny Hansley. Harry Hobbs, Jr.,
Horrell Miles, Eugene Hare.
Honorary pallbearers were
T. J. Hare, and Bill Hull.
WILLIAM ALFRED YATES
William Alfred Yates, 59, died
in Burgaw Tuesday after a long
'dness.
Funeral services were held
yesterday afternoon at 4 o’clock
at the Burgaw Baptist church
with the Reverends W. H. Poole,
Mr. Benson, P. L. Clark and Dr.
C. R. Taylor officiating. Inter
ment followed in the Burgaw
cemetery.
Mr. Yates is survived by three
sons, William Bertls Yates, Allen
Yates, and Carl Yates of Wilson,
two daughters, Mrs. Thelma
Strickland of Burgaw, and Mrs.
C. D. Scenie Yount of Myrtle
Beach, S. C.; one brother. Free
man Yates, one sister, Mrs. Hat
tie Gurganious of Watha.
Active pallbearers were
Weston Gurganious, C. L. Matt
hews, Dave Matthews, George
Barefoot, C. F. Davis, and Roy
Rowe.
MRS. BEULAH W. McLAMB
CLINTON, Oct. 1—Mrs. Beulah
Williams McLamb, 49, died sud
denly late Tuesday afternoon at
her home in Wade, Route 1,
Funeral services will be held
Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock
from Harnett Primitive Baptist
church with the Rev. Millar
Westbrook and the Rev. G. N.
Ashley in charge. Burial will be
in the church cemetery.
Surviving are her husband,
Joe A. McLamb; five sons, John,
Jamie, Joe, Jack, and Jerry R.
McLamb of the home; three
daughters, Mary Joyce, Ann
Janette and Edna Jean McLamb,
also of the home; her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Adam A. Williams
of Wade, Route 1. Three brothers,
Paul, Albert, and Rowland Wil
liams, of Wade; four sisters. Mrs.
Clarence Williamson, Clinton,
Route 2, Mrs. Cecil Matthews,
Wade, Route 1, Mrs. Naomi Mor
gan, Angier and Mary Williams,
of the home.
INFANT JOHN PEAY
Funeral services for John
Frederick Peay, day-old infant
of Mr. and Mrs. John Thomas
Peay, of Rocky Point, who died
Tuesday at 6:27 p. m. at the
Marion Sprunt annex, were held
Wednesday afternoon in the
family cemetery.
Besides the child’s parents, he
is survived by his grandparents,
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Peay, all of
Rocky Point.
MISS MARY C. COLEMAN
GREENSBORO, Oct. 1. — (JP)—
Funeral arrangements for Miss
Mary Channing Coleman, 64, head
of the department of physical
education at Women’s college, re
mained incomplete tonight.
One of the outstanding leaders
in her field. Miss Coleman died
yesterday at 11 a. m. after suf
fering a heart attack while driv
ing her car on the college campus.
A student, Miss Sylvia Kiger, of
Winston-Salem, was struck when
Miss Coleman lost control of the
car. Miss Kiger was not serious
ly hurt, however.
LION’S CLUB SPEAKER
STATESVILLE Oct. .1, _(&)—
Rear Admiral O. S. Colclough,
former commanding officer of the
state’s naval namesake — the bat
tleship North Carolina — will be
principal speaker for a regional
Lions club conference here Oct.
13, Hugh G. Mitchell, official of
the Statesville club, announced
today.
Almost half of the patients in
U. S. veterans’ hospitals are
mental and nervous cases.
HAMBONE’S MEDITATIONS
By Alley

WHIUS' DE OUE 'OMAN
visitin' Her fours
I SHO' IS HAVIN' A
60OD Time poin' MAH
OWN THINKIN''.!
Released by Th« Bell 8y«
^dleale. Ine.) Trade Mar*
/r^/y» Rej. U. 8. P»t. Ofllct)
lO'Z-y Tr
GRAND JURY
(Continued From Page One)
a type used on Navy fighter
planes, the guns were reported
by the Venezulean Embassy to
have been “destined for Vene
zuela.”
The embassy said the gun
running venture was undertaken
in behalf of a group of Vene
zuelan exiles.
The federal bureau of investi
gation identified Eisenhardt as
owner of Pan Amercan Trans
port, Inc., and the State Depart
ment said he formerly repre
sented the United States Board
of Economic Warfare in Vene
zuela and Colombia.
Airline Pilot
Fuego, taken Into custody at
Miami Beach April 24, was ac
cused of taking the guns from
Bush field and transporting
them to Daniel Field, near Au
gusta .where they were loaded
on the private plane. The gov
ernment identified Fuego as a
pilot and mechanic on Eisen
hardt’s airline.
Russell, a former Army flier,
also was listed among Eisen
hardt’s pilots. He is charged
with flying the guns from Au
gusta to Baltimore, and later
trucking them to Eisenhardt’s
home.
TOBACCOPRICES
(Continued From Page One)
the lowest daily average since
Sept. 25.
Only normal price variations
of from $1 to $2 per hundred
were reported on middle belt
marts and gains and losses
were about evenly divided.
Practically all grades on the
Border markets were steady to
higher with low and common
grades and nondescript making
the broadest gains. Sales Tues
day totaled 2,727,491 pounds at
an average of $28.10. It was an
nounced that the Darlington, S.
C , market would hold final
sales Friday.
BOARD WILL GET
(Continued From Page One)
his office to look into possible
criminal prosecution of Fritz.
Held Parley
McMullan and Solicitor James
O. Farthing met recently to dis
cuss possible action against the
North Carolina Education Asso
ciation president for admitted
payroll padding at Hudson. They
said Fritz’ guilt should be decid
ed by a court but that no action
would be taken until after the
board meeting.
Reid said the board also would i
hear a report from two board
members who met with patrons
and officials of the Sharon
school in Iredell county over an
other boycott.
A committee to look into a
third boycott at Wheat Swamp
school near Kinston is not sched
uled to meet until October 8 at
Kinston, Reid said.
The careless smoker is said
to be the greatest single cause
of forest fires.
WILMINGTON
TUESDAY pr
OCT. «
Shipyard Parking Lois
Thi, yew presenting the Most Stupendous /Wof
Stars snd Features in Cole Bros. History, including
the renowned
CRISTIAll FAMILY
World’s Gr»ateU Bartback Rldars
HUBERT CASTLE
WORLD_FAMOUS WIRE ST A R
350 Men ,nd Women Arenic'stars - 90 World
“ Famous Clowns - 3 Herds Elephants - 290
Horses and Ponies - hugs MENAGERIE filled with
Wild Jungle Beasts - BIG RAILROAD SHOW
TWICE DAILY & R PTmTTpoPULAR
DOORS OPEN 1-15 & 7 P.M. [PRICES
V.laumkrawaS
TICKETS ON SALES SHOW DAY AT
EFIRD'S DEPT. STORE
( Ly levs
American Legion post memo
in Wilmington meeting tonight
Legion home at 8 o’clock -
hear Edmund H. Rogers, lor.
torney, speak on the subject
“Communism,” Larry Sch .
service officer of the Wihn
ton organization said yoste,,
The U. S. Coast Guard ;
ter Mendota left her r
house berth at 9 a. m. yes
enroute to Baltimore, Boston
later weather station din .
Newfoundland. She is exp.
to return in December.
Donald Carter, field repre.
tative National Property : , ■
Home Owners Foundati . is ex
pected to call a meeting of Nc ■
Hanover county realtors today
to explain plans for form;,; ,n
of a local chapter, J. E. L. Wade,
national director, said yesterday
Eligible World War II vet. r
ons in North Carolina may enroll
for aircraft engine mechanics
course sponsored by New Han
over County Board of Education
at Bluethenthal field. Interested
veterans have been asked to con
tact George H. West, vocalic rial
department, New Hanover High
school.
The weekly program sponsored
by the local National Guard re
cruiting office in the Custom
House will be broadcast over
WMFD this afternoon at 6:30
o’clock, it was announced yester
day by recruiting officials. The
subject will be “This Day.''
_ ~
NOW
■5 OPEN!
ST. JOHN'S
_ TAYERN
“ RESTAURANT ff?
114 Orange St.
Tel. 2-8085 r
DRIVE-IN-THEATRE
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