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The Wilmington morning star. (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, October 02, 1947, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-10-02/ed-1/seq-5/

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S)I^CHIDS
Copynghl 194? by Arcorfie Hou„
: • Distributed by King Features Syndicate 1 " ’ '
CHAPTER
THIRTY-EIGHT
"Gail. I simply won’t have it.
■ voU hear?’ Lissa said sharp
?. "“You are coming back to
yevv York with Martin and me
' d vou re going to be suitably
launched on the sort of social
csreei I've always wanted you
}l3V6
-•Mo, Mother,” said Gail, and
the* very fact that she said
“Mother'’ instead of “Lissa'’
was significant. “I’ve found a
jace" l like in the world and
the kind of career I want.”
LiSsa whirled on Charles with
, scented whisper of taffeta,
d sairi hotly, “This is your
vork. You've taught her a lot
0f nonsense about the dignity of
labor and such foolishness. I
thould have known better than
J let her come here.”
“Lissa!" said Martin, and
^0ugh his tone was quiet, there
was something in it that drew
hci' around to look at him in
f mplete astonishment. “Gail is
'lt a child any longer. She’s
old enough to know her own
*"‘‘She's barely eighteen!”
“Sorrv. Lissa—let’s have the
truth, shall we? I'm almost 20,”
• j.’d G a 11.
“We'd he happy to have you
with us. Gail,” said Martin with
complete sincerity. “I confess I
pot quite a kick out of the pros
pect of having not only a beau
tiful wife but a charming
daughter in mv erstwhile bach
elor home, and I’d be delighted
jf you could s“e it that way.
But it’s your life, and no one
pite has the right to try to live
it for you.”_
Gail studied him for a mo
ment and then she said impul
much!” 1 think 1 Uke y0U vefy
“f am honored aeeply,” said
Martin, and obviously meant it
Jursu stared from one to the
other, her lovely tace flushing
with the unbecoming color of
anger.
‘Martin, are you encouraging
her in this utterly idiotic . nav
ior?” she demanded, as tnough
she could not believe such a
thing.
“I'm encouraging her to do
whatever will make her hap
py,” said Martin gently. “No
one could do her a greater serv
ice.”
But it’s all such utter non
sense!” raged Lissa. “After all
that she’s beei\ through. I want
ed her to be able to return a
lot of snubs she and I used to
have to take. I wanted her to
get her own back from some of
the superior people we’ve visit
ed—” Her voice died beneath
the look in Martin’s eyes. For a
moment she looked almost
frightened.
Martin said quietly, “Now
that Gail is here and safe, you’d
best get some rest, my dear.
Come along. I’m sure Gail has
a lot to discuss with her father
and Mrs. Prentice. Good night,
all.”
He put his arm about Lissa
and drew her up the stairs, his
arm loosely about her as she
went willingly, tightening a lit
tle when she slowed or showed
any desire to stop or turn back.
When the door had closed be
hind them. Gail turned to
Charles and Kate and said hur
riedly, abashed, “You mustn’t
judge her too severely. After
all, she’s beautiful and sweet.
Everybody sort of pampers
her.”
There was a hint ot amuse
ment in Charles’ eyes.
“You don’t have to explain
Lissa to me, chick. I knew' her
long before you were born,” he
said gently.
Kate said comfortingly,
“We're so glad you’ye come
back, Gail, Did you stop for
supper along the way? If not,
you must all be starved. I’ve
some sandwiches and a salad
W’aiting.”
“I am famished!” Norah said
cheerfully. “Right this minute,
I can’t remember whether
W'e’ve had anything since six
this morning—or was it yester
day?”
She and Kate went toward the
kitchen and Charles and Gail
looked at each other. Charles
held out his arms and Gail ran
into them and for a moment
they held each other close.
“I’ve missed you, chick,”
said Charles huskily.
“I’m sorry I worried vou, Fa
ther.”
“You did what you felt you
had to do. chick,” said Charles.
“Shall we leave it at. that? And
find out more about, the sand
wiches and the salad?”
“I love you!” she told him
impulsively, and stood on tip
toe to kiss his cheek.
They went arm in arm into
the kitchen, where Paul, Greg
and Norah already sat at the
kitchen table, hungrilv attack
ing the food Kate placed before
them.
Paul rose as Gail came in,
held her chair for her, and
beamed down at her cheerfully.
“I don’t know when I’ve had
so much fun,” he said happily.
“This is — well, 1 think places
like this were what we fellows
were fighting for, now that I
come to think about it. Of
course, I’d never seen one until
day before yesterday. I suppose
I thought I was fighting for home
—a cold-water flat on the East
Side, that changed very month
or so, usually for something a
little worse—”
He broke off, helped himself
to another sandwich, a, 1 said
casually, “Sorry—skip it.”
Charles looked at him surious
ly, a gentle expression in his
eyes, and made some remark
The chatter became casual, and
friendly. They were all tired,
but relaxed and happy in the
knowledge that Gail was here
again. And Gail, looking about
the little group with the sting
of tears in her eyes, swallowed
a lump in her throat.
Here they were, the people
she loved best in all the world:
her father; the woman who
seemed more her mother than
Lissa ever could; the girl she
would have chosen for a sister
if she had had a choico--and
Greg, and she turned her eyes
sharply away from him.
He had not looked at her aft
er that one glance when she had
come into the room with
Charles’ arm about her. He had
eaten very little, crumbling his
sandwich, drinking half a glass
of milk. As soon as he decently
could, he stood up, pretended a
yawn, and said casually, “Well,
I think I’ll turn in. If you don’t
mind bunking with me, Paul,
you can come up whenever
you’re ready”
Paul thrust back his chair.
Norah rose, too, and stretched
her arm* in a luxurious yawn
and said, “I think that’s an ex
On The Job Or Off. . .
There's Wear, Value And
Good Looks In
Sears Work Clothes!
HERCULES
RC6.U.5 WH.OTf
THE R1GHT WAY
TO SAY
MEN’S
SPORTSWEAR
Hercules
C APE SKIN
JACKET
Pile Lined For Warm Wear
16»s
ALSO SOLD ON EASY PAYMENT
Hercules Capeskin jacket with double
faced pile lining will stop the fiercest
wind and keep you snugly warm. Trim
fitting knit wristlets, collar and bottom
band. Zipper front. Cocoa brown color
with brown knit trimmings. Sizes 34
to 48.
Men's Zip Jacket
Fine quality covert cloth.
Has a zip front, 2 slash and a
ripper cigarette pocket. Cot
ton and wool lining. Grey.
Water 9.98
Repellent O'
Trousers to Match_2.29
Men's Sport Shirt
Buffalo Plaid
Ifasvy cotton flannel shirt,
^oice in red and black, or
bk>ek and white.
Corduroy Slacks
£.98
Pair
Year ’round weight corduroy
slacks in a smart pleated drape
model style. In waist sizes 28
40. For school, play.
Neil's Work Shirt
9.49
Hercules “
Gives comfortable long wear.
Sanforized tan cotton flannel
shirt cut roomy over gradu
ated patterns. Dress style col
lar. Sizes 14% to 17.
Men's Nation-Ails
Work Suits
On«-Piec« for Comfort
4-»»
Cut in graduated sizes for
superlative fit, these Hercules
work suits of 8-ounce twill are
sanforized for long wear and
good looks. Action back, all
around belt, convertible col
lar. Suntan in sizes 34 to 46,
inseam sizes, short, medium
and long.
Men's Fine Quality
Gabardine Jacket
Wind, Weather-resistant
9.95
From top to bottom, it’s a win
ner for good looks and long
wear. Rich combed cotton
gabardine gives real protec
tion. Handy zip front. 2 slash
pockets . . . and a zipper cig
arette pocket. Half belt in the
back. Full rayon lining.
Brown. Sizes 34-48.
mene^Saed^ j|^||j| * Sea/te f*my Payment Plan"
! S 9 7 If. FRONT ST. WILMINGTON, N. C. DIAL 2-2621
KILLCREST HOMES
GET STATE CHARTES
Chartered yesterday by Secre
•ary of State Thad Eure, the Hill
crest Veterans Housing corpora
•ion, of Wilmington, is ready t
help Negro veterans purchas
homes in the Hillcrest project.
The non-stock firm was incor
porated by Raymon Heath, R. M
Quinn and Millard Lilley, local
Negroes. It was announced re
cently that the homes in Hill
crest, a slum-clearance project
would be sold with veterans be
mg given preference.
ske Vil’age Manager
Assumes New Duties
Weims' of Attanta. as
iter nf ^ U!les today aa man
ger of the Lake Village develop
the Wilmington Housing
authority, according to B H
iMarshfieid, executfve d£ct2;
| He succeeds Sherman Register
Maffitt SVmagenamed ™n*g" °‘
| Weems was employed by the
| finance accounts division of the
Publin h reg-10nal 0ffice of th«
I _^llc Housing authority. Regist
er, a member of the authority’*
staff here for several years, will
have charge of the maintenance
of 1,016 units in Maffitt Village
as well as the demolition of 1,
638 other units.
The Mohawk Lumber and
Supply company of Detroit be
gan work today on its demolition
contract. Low bidder on the FHA
project, the company will receive
$14,884 from the federal govern
ment in addition to what it can
make from salvaging the build
ing material.
Dial 2-3311 For Newspaper Service
Mom than SW people have a
part in constructing the average
pair of leather-soled shoes, from
the time the hide is removed un
til the shoe appears or. retailers
shelves.
Could Victoria Roign 63 Years
With Stomach Ulcer Pains?
England’s beloved Queen could hardly
have reigned so wisely for 63 years and
remained so hale and hearty had she suf
fered stomach ulcer pains. Don’t ignore
your sufferings. Try Ugda for relief of
ulcer and stomach pains, indigestion,
gas pains, for heartburn, burning sensa
tion, bloat and other conditions caused
oy excess acid. Get a 35c box of Ugda
Tablets from your druggist. First dose
■oust convince or return box to us and
jet DOUBLE YOUF MONEY BACIC_
WILMINGTON’S HIGH
FID MAY GET BOAT
City Manager James R. Ben
son said yesterday that Wilming
ton’s bid of $13,500 for fireboat
T-76, located at Charleston, *is
the highest received by the Mari
time- commission.
It was thought unlikely that a
higher bid would be received by
mail, such bid having to be post
marked before the closing of bid
ding.
Benson said that the boat, if
Wilmington's bid remains high,
would be brought to the city and
equipped with new fire-fighting
apparatus and placed into
service as soon as possible.
WALLACE TOBACCO
MARKET HOLDS GAIN
(Special To The Star)
WALLACE, Oct. 1. — Wallace
tobacco held the gains picked up
on Monday by continuing to
show the high averages in sales
today, according to John Sikes,
sales supervisor.
Top grades brought up to $61
per hundred while medium
grades kept their three to eight
dollar gains of Monday.
The market sold 266,000 pounds
.today for $119,886.
! This was an average of $45.07
rper 100 pounds.
Warehousemen here urged
farmers to get their tobacco on
i the market as soon as possible,
thereby taking advantage of these
good prices.
The persimmon is an Ameri
can native fruit and grows wild
throughout the United States
from Connecticut to the Caro
linas and westward to Missouri
1 and Arkansas. This is a close
'relative of the Japanese per
simmon or date-plum, which
came originally from China.
cellent idea. Gail, you’re in with
me tonight, since Mr. nd Mrs.
Kincaid have your old room.
Leave the dishes, Kate, and I’ll
do 'em in the morning. We’re
all dead for sle.eD.”
At the foot of the stairs Gail
kissed Charles good night and
turned impulsively to Kate and
hugged her hard and kissed her,
too.
“Sorry I bothered you all. I
won’t again, I promise,” she
said remorsefully, and followed
Norah up the stairs.
Norah’s big square room,
with the enormous old-fashioned
bed, its feather mattress puffy
beneath an immaculate white
cotton spread — Gail had help
ed with the laundry here and
grimaced a little at the mem
ory of what a task it was to
iron those spreads so smooth
ly—seemed to welcome her.
She opened her overnight bag,
took out her nightgown, .obe,
slippers and toothbrush, as Nor
ah yawned herself out of her
clothes and into a cotton night
dress.
“Norah,” said Gail uncertain
i ly, “I don’t want to pry, but
j what you told me before we left
—about—about—”
1 “My husband?” said Norah
’ gently.
I “Isn’t thert any hope at all?
i asked Gail.
Norah’s face set and whiten
ed. There was bitterness and
pain in her eyes, but after a
moment she answered quietly
enough.
“They hate to admit that
there’s no hope, in such hospi
tals,” she said slowly. “The
doctors are wonderful and the
equipment and the training—
there’s nothing left out. They
are doing everything humanly
possible; there is the barest
possible chance. But I’ve hoped
! for so long, and counted on it
: so surely that I’ve got to the
point where it’s easier just to
admit that it is hopeless. Physi
cally, he’s in good shape. They
say that is good, that it is only
the mind that needs doctoring.
But Gail, the mind is—all! I
mean the mind is Bill. Without
it he is a stranger to me as I’
am to him.”
| (To Be Continued)
, — .. . ..
Anniversary!
REAL VALUES
FOR ALL
yjc&ei Box
1 Breny KiiVKi-wmamiM me
v2#*v 10* N. FRONT STMET
*Vilmht£fcon V F^argcst Credit
\ Jewelers
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The key to a smart and versatile
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Here you will find an array of color*
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34 to 40.
$3.50 io $8.95
Utility Sweaters
They’re lovely, cozy warm utlilty sweaters
beautifully made of all wool, many are de
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range of colors include: Navy, blue, green,
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$3-95 to $10-95
Coat Sweaters
A smartly styled coat and sweater of 60% wool and
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navy and wine. Sizes 36 to 44.
BELK’S SWEATERS 4 SECOND FLOOR
$3-95
JAVA .. . another Heyday* toot
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sole for that welking-on-air
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Black
Brown
Red
Green
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$895
BELK S SHOES ♦ FIRST FLOOR
Lovely Hammered Aluminum
Serving
TRAY
BOWLS
feautiful hammered aluminum bowl* and tray* ,.. reminieiemt of an age old art
hev’re lusturous bright and made more beautiful with a large center floral ana
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of all they’re so inexpensive.
Hammered Aluminum Bread Tray
$1.00
Beautifully designed in gleaming ham
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ness to your own table, and then too,
they are perfect as a gift.
GIFT SHOP 4 SECOND FLOOR

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