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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, October 13, 1947, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-10-13/ed-1/seq-3/

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Plane Passengers Pass Out
Cold From Hurricane Fright
E. V. W. JONES
MIAMI- Fla., Oct. 12—dP)—
, Navy hurricane hunt
• . , an welcome a couple of
r iba'n grandmothers, a bride and
tUol‘| ;md 32 other passengers
^ ("’"thcir ranks after a wild ride
11 rough the hurricane by a big
r'u' -> ngined passenger plane last
pan-American Airways
— cn route to Miami from
P;, ,',.a with 40 persons on board,
46'cf " them passengers, went on
|,urricane-hunting jaunt en
‘ '- unintentionally and, as far
^ ‘passengers are concerned, un
willingly
Through some fault in weather
formation, the crew left Havana
' lieving they would follow the
b m into Miami. Instead, the
' plane virtually passed
through the eye of the vicious dis
bancc southwest of Miami. No
'J|1lip of air passengers ever re
eved a wilder ride.
Drip Cold Sweat
geven nassengers passed out
id from fright. Others dripped
id iv. cat. and all agreed later
-hat p-avers had been said. Mrs.
jones and I can testify to the
cold sweat. We were aboard.
The group left Havana at 5:45
| m yesterday in a torrential
I downpour and sped out over the
Florida straits. They witnessed
1 a colorful sunset above the clouds
I _and nosed into the storm.
Their big airplane was tossed
‘ 3bout like a feather. Vertical
iiT blasts sometimes threw it
■ straight up 1,000 feet or more,
S sometimes dropped it sickeningly
a, great a distance. Lightning,
j brilliant and blinding, flickered
.. Million® rely
B on the name,
Moroline, for
filtered tygpetro\eum
FOR EXTRA QUALITY
•PURITY,-*—
HOI —■
I never collected
anyth mg until
mr SALVAGE
began!
Says NORMAN BEL BEDDES,
Famous Industrial Designnr
First editions, antiques and
left-handed teacups interest
some people as collectors’
Items, I’m no collector, ex
cept when it comes to used
fats. I’ve been reading how
ar gently every pound of used
kitchen grease is still needed.
The government says that
the present world supply of
fats and oils to make so many
tilings we all need is only a
kttle better than It was last
year, The only extra source
to depend on is America’s
kitchens. That’s why I’ve
turned collector—of used
fa is ' Please, won’t you keep
saving and turning them in?
TVRH IN YOVKUXD
hmsuaiBi M Salvage Committee, lac.
around the plane constantly and
once a ball of St. Elmo’s fire
leaped across a wing.
Rain in such torrents that only
the nearest of the engines could
be seen hammered against the
fuselage, flooded into the pilot’s
cockpit, and dripped down cabin
walls. Twice the plane ran
through hail and the sound was
like wings being torn off.
Wild Bucking
The wild'y bucking and weav
ing plane twisted so that the
cabin door flew open. Steward
F. S. Yado unbuckled his safety
belt and, held Stewardess A. A.
Brady, caught the door and pull
ed it shut again. So wild was the
ride that to unbuckle one’s safe
ty belt was to invite a tossing
from end to end of the cabin.
Capt. L. R. Shaw and co-pilot
Hal Wildman found Miami and
made passes at the airport, but
gales and unbelievably heavy
rains blanked it out time after
time. Miami was circled for an
hour and a half after the storm
already had been fought for half
an hour.
Finally the pilots fought clear
and headed for Nassau, where
the plane was landed for the
night. But troubles were not
over. After an early morning
takeoff with the same passengers,
the plane arrived over Miami’s
international airport—and a land
ing gear signal indicated that
one wheel could not be locked.
Passengers who already felt
they had stared death in the face
were given crash instructions
while the plane circled the air
port for an hour. Badly fright
ened, all were too weak to re
peat a rousing ovation and back
slapping they had awarded the
pilots after the safe landing at
Nassau.
The bride and groom who re
ceived these unexpected thrills
on their honeymoon were Mr.
and Mrs. Peter J. Pricone of
Weathersfield, Conn. An English
man, P. G. Smyrk of Johnson
Matthey Co., Ltd., London, saw
the United States for the first
time while being tossetf by the
hurricane.
Joseph Wallem, Jr., of Vin
cennes, Ind., expressed most
passengers’ views by saying:
“Hereafter, the Army and Navy
can do all my hurricane hunt
; _ _ tf
mg.
The three great contests be
tween Rome and Carthage for
supremacy in the Mediterranean
were known as the Punic wars.
They covered the period from
264 to 146 B. C., and resulted in
the destruction of Carthage. The
city was razed and the country
became a Roman province.
Dial 2-331X For Newspaper Service
Fuel Oil
PROMPT DELIVERY
GODWIN OIL CO.
Phone 7765
DRUMS — TANKS
ATTENTION
Car Owners
You save substantially
when you borrow from
THE WILMINGTON
SAYINGS & TRUST CO.
‘DoUoanna
COMPLETE LINES
Men, Women and
Children's Wear
KGTLER'S
601 Castle St.
Do You Have An Old
Faded Tintype or
Daguerreotype?
BRING THEM IN—
Let's try for a eleim
reproduction.
Adams Studio
8th Floor Trust Bldg.
*2 Years in Wilmington
Make Your Washday — Trouble Free
DIAL — TWO EIGHT-THREE-O-THREE — 2-8803
SPir ‘N* SPAN
SELF-SERVICE LAUNDRY
Jtt SREEMflELD ST.-VACUUM CLEANERS FOR RENT
ANNOUNCING
The New Location Of The
KERLE NORMAN COSMETIC'S
And
ELECTROLYSIS CENTER
At
413 SOUTHERN BUILDING
®wss DAILY: ! a. m. to 12 a. at. and 1 p m. la 5 p. >:
CALLIE R. SALEEBY
WAL MANAGER
Obituaries
MRS. F. A. JONES
Mrs. F. A. Jones, 75, 437
Kyle street, Fayetteville, died
Friday night and funeral serv
ices were conducted yesterday
at 3 o’clock with the Rev. Lewis
Gaines in charge at the First
Baptist church.
Survivers are 16 grandchil
dren; ten great-grandchildren;
five sons, O. D. of Philadelphia;
C. V., J. T., and E. N. Fayette
ville; and S. A. of New Jersey;
two daughters, Mrs. Frances
Ryan, New Jersey, Mrs. Pauline
Tartt, Seagate; one brother, J.
D. Jordan, Bladenboro.
Pallbearers were grandsons E.
J. Ryan, Jr., Fred T. Ryab,
Percy, Floys, Wesley and Don
art Tartt and Fred T. Jones and
Howard Green.
Burial was held in Fayette
ville.
MRS. NINA A. FOSTER
WARSAW, Oct. 12—Mrs. Nina
Adell Foster, 37, wife of Mimmie
Foster of near Richlands, died
Saturday morning in a Kinston
hospital after a brief illness.
Funeral services were held
at the grave-side in the family
cemetery near Beulaville yester
day afternoon at 3 o’clock by the
Rev. Bob Penny.
In addition to her husband, she
is survived by seven children,
Ernest, Lee, Joe, Kenneth Ger
ald, Bonnie Ray, Harold and
Douglass Earl Foster all of the
home; four brothers and two sis
ters.
MRS. MELLIE BARLOW
Mrs. Mellie Hill Barlow, 513 N.
Third St., wife of L. A. Barlow,
died Saturday afternon at James
Walker Memorial Hospital fol
lowing a short illness.
Mrs. Barlow, daughter of the
late Charles and Kate Goodyear
Hill, was born September 22,1895
in Marietta, North Carolina. She
was a member of the Order of
Eastern Star, and Wesley Me
morial Methodist Church of
Winter Park.
Surviving besides her husband
are one daughter, Miss Mellie
Hill Barlow of Wilmington: three
sisters, Mrs. Joe Harmon, Nor
folk, Va., Mrs. B. L. Temple, Ma
rietta, and Mrs. L. L. Mimms,
Florence, S. C.; two brothers,
C. Paul Hill, Wilmington, and
Hicks Hill, Marietta, and several
nieces and nephews.
Funeral servies will be con
ducted from the Chapel of An
drews mortuary this morning at
11 o’clock by the Rev. J. A.
Russell, assisted by the Rev. K.
R. Wheeler. Interment will fol
low in Oakdale cemetery.
Pallbearers will be: Honorary.
Dr. George Johnson, Dr. Paul
L. Stuck, J. V. Powers, Robert
Lockamy, T. H. Nunnelle, Jr.,
Charles P. Bell, R. F. Powers,
Wilton Bailey, and Douglas
Bailey. Active: Lawrence Flana
gan, W. F. King, W. P. Farrow,
N. M. Johnson, C. H. Fleming,
Jr., and L. R. Lynch.
JAMES B. ANDREWS
WARSAW, Oct. 12—James B.
Andrews, 70, died Saturday
morning after an illness of five
weeks, at the home of his
daughter, Mrs. McAllen Brown
of the Muddy Creek community
near Beulaville.
Funeral services were held
at the home of Mrs. Brown at
2 o’clock Sunday afternoon.
Burial followed in the family
cemetery near the home.
He is survived by three sons:
Jimmie Andrews, Hampton An
drews, and Lloyd Andrews, all
of the home and four daught
ers, Mrs. Leon Sholar of Wal
lace, Mrs. O. R. Cavenaugh,
Mrs. Herman Southerland and
Beltevelt orflbt/
rtRS.R.G.KLElSER
Mishawaka, Ind.
HAS 4 DAUGHTERS BORHON THE
22BS OF THE MOMTH(SirgkBirths)
OlWTWOS m 4
MlCHALAKOPULOS
WAS STRUCK fry LIGHTNINGS
-/TRIPPED OFF HIS CLOTHES
AND fitted them on a goat
THAT WALKED BEFORE HIM'
Opt. mJ.tUst fanrttVaaK.fariJeifri.--m*
^CRow Rides dog '
LIKE A JOCKEY
Hwwy STEWAHI-Jenckiftt
Mrs. McAllen Brown all of Chin
quapin.
JAMES A. HOLLINGSWORTH
BURGAW, Oct. 12—James A.
Hollingsworth, 86, died Friday at
the home of his daughter in San
Benito, Texas.
Mr. Hollingsworth had been
active in real estate developments
in southern Texas, but retired
several years ago.
He is survived by his widow,
Mrs. Mollie Murphy Hollings
worth, formerly of Atkinson;
two children, Alice Mayer of San
Benito, Texas, and Robert, of San
Antonia, Texas.
6. L. MEDLIN
G. L. Medlin, 106 Alabama
Avenue, died suddenly at his
home yesterday.
He is survived by his wife,
Mrs. Rosa Walker Medlin; daugh
ter, Mrs. G. W. Walker; grand
son, Herbert Walker; two
grandaughcers, Betty and Carol
Medlin of Germany; brother, Tom
Walker ox North West; sister
Mrs. Cora Cook of Raleigh; also
several neices and nephews.
Funeral servies wil be an
nouned later by Andrews Mor
tuary.
JOSEPH M. WILCOX
SANFORD, Oct. 12. — W —
Joseph Martin Wilcox, 80, mem
ber of the general assembly in
1939 and member of the Lee
county board of commissioners
for the past 20, years died in
the Lee county hospital today
following a lengthy illness.
He was president of the Pro
duction Credit administration in
this district president of the Lee
county Farm Loan association, a
member of the Lee welfare
board, and during World War
II served on the county draft
board.
Funeral services will be held
tomorrow afternoon.
MISS IDA HODGES
LUMBERTON, Oct. 12—Miss
Ida Hodges, 71, died this morn
ing at 12:45 at the home of her
brother-in-law and sister, Mr.
and Mrs. Stephen Smith, on
Lumberton, Route 4, She had
been in ill health for about
seven years.
Funeral services will be held
Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock
from the home by Rev. E. A.
Paul, a former pastor of Raft
Swamp Baptist church, of which
she had been a member for
many years. Interment will be
in the family plot in Raft Swamp
church cemetary.
Surviving are five sisters, Mrs.
Stephen Smith, Mrs. A. W.
Powell and Mrs. Jerry Odum,
all of Lumberton, Route 4.Mrs.
Odum is a patient in Thompson
hospital here, Mrs. J. P. Bowen
of Marston, and Mrs. Sarah
Brigman, of Jacksonville, Fla.,
a brother, Rev. M. F. Hodges
of Troy, died a few weeks ago.
Miss Hodges was born in the
Raft Swamp section of Robeson
county on May 5, 1876, A daught
er of the late Martin F. Hodges
and Mrs. Martha Jane Parham
Hodges.
City Briefs
The McClure Fellowship Bible
class will resume fellowship
Bible study at the YMCA at
6:30 o’clock tonight. The men of
the city are invited to attend.
The Wilmington Ministerial
Association will hold their regu
lar meeting at the YMCA this
morning at 11 o’clock, it was
announced yesterday by J. B.
Huntington, general secretary of
the YMCA. _
The Wilmington Ligh Infantry
will hold its meeting tonight at
the Armory Hall on Market street
instead of at Eight and Ann
streets as previously reported.
LUMBERTON MAN
DIES OF BULLET
WOUND IN HEAD
LUMBERTON, Oct. 12. *- (ff)
— Russell S. Beam, Jr., 25, died
early today of a bullet wound
in the head, Coroner D. W. Biggs
reported.
Biggs said that he was out of
town at the time jf the shooting
but from reports he had received
he believed no inquest or any
other official inquiry would be
necessary.
Beam attended Davidson col
lege before the war and then
served with the army in Europe.
He was the only son of the late,
Dr. R. S. Beam, surgeon and
bank president.
Funeral services will be Tues
day.
I The Book Of Knowledge
i __
(Department: —ANIMAL LIFE)
The Hone Family
In this family we have man’s
faithful friend, the horse, and
also the donkey, the wild asses
and the zebras. These are all
near relatives.
The history of the horse and
its relatives has been traced
back far into the past. Their
bones are found in great abun
dance in fossil beds. Consequent
ly few animals of the past are
so well known.
I More than a hundred years
I ago, some teeth and part of a
| skull of an ancient horse were
I found in England. After the first
1 discovery of the English ancient
| horse, bones and teeth of very
similar horses were found in
' New Mexico and ’Wyoming. Fi
i nally, a complete skeleton was
j discovered of this “dawn horse,”
or Eohippus, as it was called.
! Eohippus lived in the forests that
covered much of North America
long ago.
At various times North Amer
ica, original home of the horses,
was connected with Asia by land,
where Bering Strait is now. It
is supposed that horses wander
er over to Asia by way of Alas
ka, later spreading to Europe.
Later still, horses spread almost
1 everywhere.
Just before the end of the Ice
Age, something happened to
make the wild horses of North
America disappear. What it was
no one knows, but they all dis
appeared. The sea had washed
over the bridge of land connect
ing Alaska with Siberia, and no
horses could come back to the
land of their ancestors. Until
the Spanish explorers came to
Mexico in the 16th century, none
of the Indians had ever seen a
horse.
Not long after the conquest
of Mexico, a number of horses
escaped from their owners, and
herds developed, spreading north
in the course of years. They
found good country and soon
numbered many thousands. The
same thing happened when
horses were taken to South
America.
Let us go back to the period
before the Ice Age. After reach
ing the Old World, horses spread
and multiplied. Those in dif
ferent parts grew to be quite
unlike each other in appearance.
There were at least two species.
One of these was heavily built,
with big heads, thick necks and
stiff, upstanding manes. These
coarse, ugly horses lived on the
plains of central Asia and on
plains and forests of Europe. Up
until a few hundred years ago,
| Draft mara^tilte^iese^are much used on farms for plowing j
herds of these wild horses are
said to have lived in the Polish
forests, and closely related
horses still roam the upland
plains of Asia. Przevalski’s
horse, named from its discoverer,
Nicholas Przevalski, is this type.
Sometimes we can see one in the
zoo.
In North Africa, another type
developed. It had long, fine legs;
a long, graceful, arched neck;
and a long, pointed head. This
was the stock from which the
Arab and Barbary steeds, famous
for their beauty and speed, are
descended.
After ma ndomesticated horses,
through careful breeding and
selection, many different types
were developed. The heavy cart
or draft horses were derived
from the European wild horses.
Most of the carriage horses and
saddle horses are partly of
African and partly of European
descent.
(Copyright, 1946, by the Gro
lier Society, Inc., based upon the
Book of Knowledge.)
(Distributed by United Feat
ure Syndicate, Inc.)
Tommor:—Games and Sports
of Colonial days.
Looking like a big-headed, ugly '
pony, dark grayish brown in
color, the little Przevalski’s horse
lives in Central Asia. Until a few
hundred years ago, herds of these
wild horses are said to have lived
in the Polish forests. It was
named from its dMS»v«M*t Misfc
►oias ftnavalatt.
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OVER THE NETWORKS
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Time is eastern standard. For cen
tral standard subtract one hour, for
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hours. Some local stations change
hour of relay to fit local schedules.
Last minnte program changes can
not be included.
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Newscast Every Day—cbs
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News, Variety, Dance 2 hrs.—ebs
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22821
mi ONLY DOMESTIC JUIUNE OFEUTHK EVIIY HMD
BOM NEW YOHt WYTH 4-EMWB IQHtfMEMT.
BRITISH LABORITE
TO SPEAK IN STATE
FOUR TIMES TODAY
RALEIGH, Oct. 12. — 0P) _
Victor F. Sates, labor party mem
ber of Britain's parliament, will
deliver four addresses in Raleigh
tomorrow.
Yates will speak at Meredith
college tomorrow and will make
a brief speech at a public affairs
luncheon at the Raleigh Y. W.
M. C.
“The present international
scene” will be the topic of an
address by Yates at a dinner
meeting at N. C. State college,
and he will speak at a public
meeting at Raleigh’s United
church tomorrow night. He sub
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ject will be “How Britaia sa4
America Must Work Together fW
Peace.”
A dollar today buys iS times
as much light as it did 20 years
ago, the lighting industry
claims.
Girt
Supplies
• Brushes
• Oil Colors
• Water Colors
• Palettes
• Canvas & Stretchers
• Water, Charcoal
And Oil Color
Paper
• Speedball Pens
• Speedball Text
Books
• Speedball Cartoon
Exercises
• Stenso Lettering Sets
• Charcoal Pencils
• Drawing Pencils
• Crayons
• Textile Paint Sets
• Textile Paint Refills
--#
SHAW
Paint & Wall Paper Co.
314 N. Front Dial 5232
H. Berger & Son
Furniture and Home Furnishings
SPECIALS ON STOVES. HEATROLAS. BLANKETS
707 NORTH FOURTH ST. DIAL Sltt
A,,T0U'. rtANN***
-y llN* M
pA*" *HOWINOt
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A "Time Out" between eaH* give*
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vne»b0»Y',hVo G^V
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IN EMERGENCY
When another porty on the fcw
has an emergency, please
release the line quickly.
POUTSNiSS PA VIS THS WAV TO
A PUASAHT PAKTY UNO
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THE STRAIGHT WHISKIES IN THIS PRODUCT
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STRAIGHT WHISKY • 7*V»% GRAIN NEUTRAL Jf MJfl
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COBBS DISTILLING CORPORATION
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