OCR Interpretation


The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, December 02, 1947, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78002169/1947-12-02/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

Trade Winds Buzzing At Baseball
Parley; Yankees, Browns, Braves
And Indians Interested In Deals
MIAMI, Fla., Dec. 1. — W —
Trade winds kept the baseball
lobby buzzing with rumors about
a big deal by the New York
' Yankees today but no concrete
action resulted from the winter
meeting speculation.
Persistent reports had pitcher
Walter Masterson or Early
Wynn of the Washington Sena
tors headed for the Yankee
Stadium in a major swap still
. in the tentative stage.
Manager Bucky Harris of the
World Champions would admit
nothing beyond a statement that
a deal for a pitcher quite likely
would be made. If such a tran
• saction is completed the Yanks
plan to hold up the announce
ment for the Major League meet
ing next week at New York.
Last March the Yanks were
hot for a deal with Washington
for first baseman Mickey Ver
non. Although they reportedly
offered catcher AAron Robinso^.
outfielder Johnny Lindell and
athers at the time, owner Clark
•‘Cushman” I
209 Market St. P'al 2-3224
What A Cough!
And how it hurts, and nags
And disturbs your sleep.
Chronic bronchitis may develop 18
your cough, chest cold, or acute bron
chitis is not treated and you cannot
afford to take a chance with any medi
cine less potent than Creomulsion
which goes right to the seat of the
trouble to help loosen and expel germ
laden phlegm and aid nature to
soothe and heal raw, tender, inflamed
bronchial mucous membranes.
Creomulsion blends beechwood
creosote byspecial processwith other
time tested medicines for coughs.
It contains no narcotics.
No matter how many medicines
you have tried, tell your druggist to
sell you a bottle of Creomulsion with
the understanding you must like the
way it quickly allays the cough, per
mitting rest and sleep, or you are to
have your money back. (Adv.)
A New Idea in
Men's Fine
Leather Jackets
Iwesfiphilo thisscnooth, sap
pi* jacket of feather-weight
saede or capeskin by Mon
a*ch. That alone is an invita
tion to outdoor pleasure.
Tiear it open, or zip up the
smartly styled convertible tur
tleneck collar. Any way you
look at it, this skfflfoAy tat
tooed jacket is a l.arvdous
oatae. P--nn lined.
GOGu oi.OTHES
131 N. Front St.
Griffith of the Sens turned them
down cold.
The Yankees weren’t the only
club trying to stir up business.
Although this is a minor league
convention, it is largely a meet
ing of the Majors and their farm
connections. Even more impor
tant than technical changes in
the intricate baseball law, is the
desire of each club to improve
its roster for next season.
Bill Veeck, president of the
Cleveland Indians, blew into
town and went into a huddle
with Bill DeWitt, head of the
St. Louis Browns who said yes
terday he would deal outfielder
Jeff Heath and all men over
28, except pitcher Nelson Pot
ter.
Veeck came out of the short
conference without biting at the
Browns’ bait. He already had ac
quired pitcher Bob Muncrief and
j Wally Judnich from the St.
! L o u i s club two weeks ago.
i Lou Boudreau, recently sign
ed to a two-year contract to
manage the Indians, confirmed
reports that the Tribe was look
ing for an outfielder but said
nothing was “on the fire.”
The Detroit Tigers were o.. the
prowl for infield talent, needing
a second base and shortstop com
bination if they again are to be
come a pennant factor.
Recent activity by the Boston
Red Sox who acquired shortstop
Vern Stephens and pitchers Jack
Kramer and Ellis Kinder from
the Browns for about $345,0. j
and 10 players has made All
American league clubs realize
they must strengthen. With Joe
McCarthy back at the helm. The
consensus of opinion around these
meetings is that the Sox are the
team to beat in 1948.
With Branch Ricky absent, the
Brooklyn Dodgers delegation is
represented by its farm directors,
pending arrival of a delegation
CHANDLER VOIDS
BERARDINE DEAL
! . _
CINCINNATI, O., Dec. 1—(U.R)
—Infielder Gerry Priddy and a
$40,000 check were returned to
the Washington Senators today
by baseball commissioner A. B.
Chandler, who voided a deal
i which would have sent the play
,er and the money to the St. Lousi
Browns for kecond baseman
Johnny Berardino.
I After the deal was made on
'Nov. 22, Berardino announced he
jwas retiring from baseball be
cause he had been given a seven
year moving picture contract as
an actor. Griffith immediately
moved to cancel the deal by
appealing to Chandler.
Chandler said that efforts to
learn whether Berardino would
return to baseball in 1948 proved
futile. Therefore, he explained,
that he cancelled the transaction
under major league rule 12-F
which states that “a player trans
fer shall be void in the event
... of a player’s bona fide re
tirement from the game during
the interval between assignment
and the date of reporting to the
assignee club.”
BICYCLES
and
REPAIRING
AT YOUR
SPoggMi
114 MARKET DIAL 6022
Penn-Pleuger
& Ocean City
REELS
Montaque Rods
Creek Chub Lures
HINES
SPORTING GOODS
14 Princess St. Dial 2-1120
Come Down ...
, AND CATCH THE
BIG ONES
Everybody’s Welcome
— AT —
ATLANTIC VIEW
FISHING PIER
JOHN D. MERCER, Owner
Phone 8-2319
Northern Extension—Wrightsville
“You Get A Better Buy At Blackwoods”
kl Sciberiing Tires - Stewart Warner
|I Eadios — Philco Auto Radios —
|1__Batteries—Seat Covers
? BLACKWOOD’S
18 North 2nd St. Dial 2-14SS
It’s Not Too Late If You Act Now!
You Can Enjoy The Miracle
Of Gas In Your Home This Winter
PROPANE — BUTANE GAS
PORT CITY GAS & APPLIANCE CORP.
Dial 2-2289_Opposite Shipyard
Be wise And Choose Early
USE BERGER’S LAY AWAY PLAN TODAY
COMPLETE SELECTION OF TOYS
II. BERGER & SON
707 NORTH FOURTH STREET
that has been inspecting tne
spring training base at San Do
mingo.
The Boston Braves are working
on some business with the Chi
cago Cubs that would bring a
pitcher to the hub in exchange
for a shortstop. Boston counts
heavily on rookie Alvin Dark,
who had a terrific year with man
ager Nick Cullop at Milwaukee,
to become the regular shortstop.
Consequently they are in a po
sition to talk turkey with others
about the likes of Dick Culler.
Cincinnati was angling for a cen
ter fielder and was willing to let
go of a veteran pitcher.
Big league trade talk overshad
owed minor developments of the
National Association which opens
its regular business sessions
Wednesday morning.
President George Trautman of
the Association met with directors
of all farm club organizations
and the International League re
elected president Frank Shaugh
nessy.
Although no member of the
executive committee would con
firm it, there was a strong re
port that the Pacific Coast Lea
gue’s resolution asking for status
as a major league would not be
considered by the minors, pend
ing acceptance or rejection by the
majors.
Leo Miller of Syracuse, chair
man of a recodification committee
which has drawn up a new Na
tional association agreement said
the coast league matter was
settled as far as the minors are
concerned. He refused to amplify
his statement.
MCCRAY, JUSTICE
HONORED AT MEET
DURHAM, Dec. 1. —W— R. N.
(Rube) McCray of William and
Mary was honored as coach of
the year in the Southern Con
ference and Charlie Justice of
North Carolina was lauded as the
most valuable player of the past
season in the Conference at a
testimonial dinner,
testimonial dinner pitched in
their honor by the Durham
Quarterback club here tonight.
McCray and Justice were chos
en for the honors by a vote of the
16 head coaches in the Confer
ence. It will be an annual af
fair conducted among the coaches
by the Quarterback club and the
Durham Morning Herald.
Members of the coaching staffs
of Duke, Carolina, Wake Forest,
Davidson and N. C. State were
honor guests at a program fea
turing a talk by Fred Russell,
sports Editor of the Banner, Nash
ville, Tenn.
Among the head coaches on
hand for the banquet were Wal
lace Wade of Duke, Beattie Feath
ers of N. C. State, Peahead Walk
er of Wake Forest, Bill Story of
Davidson and Carl Snavely of
North < arolina, and several mem
bers of their staffs.
McCray was presented a plaque
and autographed pen and
pencil set, while Justice was
awarded a trophy.
Jack Horner, Sports Editor of
the Morning Herald and presi
dent of the Quarterback club,
presided and recognized the visit
ing coaches, newspapermen and
radio communtators.
A crowd of over 400 turned
out for the occasion, held in the
City Armory.
LUJACK AWARDED
HEISMAN TROPY
NEW YORK, Dec. 1. — (*) —
Johnny Lujack, field general of
Notre Dame’s all-conquering
football team, today added the
Heisman Memorial Trophy to
his long list of honors for grid
iron prowess.
The 22-year old quarterback
from Connellsville, Pa. received
a total of 742 points in the down
town A.C.’s annual poll of
sports writers and broadcast
ers to determine the nation’s
outstanding college football
player.
An All-America back last year
and a virtually certainty to du
plicate the feat this year, Lu_
jack will personally receive the
gleaming prize at the sponsor
ing club’s dinner here Dec. 10.
A great passer as well as an
able strategist, Lujack won easi
ly over Michigan’s Bob Chap
puis who collectted 550 points.
Doak Walker of Southern Metho
dist was third with 196 followed
by Charley Conerly, Mississippi
186; Harry Gilmer, Alabama,
115; Bobby Layne, Texas, 74;
Charley Bednarik, Pennsyl
vania, 65; and Bill Swiacki, Co
lumbia, 61. The first six are all
backs. Bednarik is a center and
Swiacki an end.
A senior, who is being pur
sued by pro scouts, Lujack fol
lows in the steps of Army’s
Glenn liavis, winner of the 1946
award. Doc Blanchard, Davis’
teammate at West Point, won
the trophy in 1945.
SEIXAS INUITED
CHAPEL HILL, Dec. 1 -W—
Victor Seixas, North Carolina’s
top seeded tennis star last season
and one of the n. tion s ranking
amateur netmen, has been ex
tended an invitation to partici
pate in the Sugar Bowl tennis
matches December 28-30, Coach
John Kenfield announced today.
Dial U1U For Newapaper Service
ORANGE BOWL BID PLEASES TECH GRIDDERS — Mem
bers of Georgia Tech’s football team, jubilant after learning of
their selection to meet the University of Kansas in the Orange
Bowl at Miami, Fla., New Year’s Day, playfully douse their in
jured teammate, halfback George Mathews, with a tubfull of
cold water. Left to right: freshman halfback Bob McCoy, tackles
Tom Coleman and Bobby Davis, quarterback Jimmy Southard,
and guard Ewell Pope. Mathews, injured in the game with Duke,
November 1, was unable to play against Georgia Saturday, but
hopes to be ready for Kansas, January 1.(W Photo)
Almost All Bowls Filled
For Post-Season Games
By The Associated Press
Selection of teams for the ’Ga
tor, Dixie and Sun Bowl filled
virtually all of the New Year’s
Day post-season programs yes
terday.
Acceptances came thick and
fast yesterday as, with their reg
ulation seasons completed, at
least a half dozen college elevens
acted on bids extended them by
howl sponsors.
Maryland and Georgia went in
to the ’Gator Bowl at Jackson
ville, Miami (O.) University join
ed Texas Tech in the Sun Bowl
at El Paso, Tex., and Arkansas
voied to meet William and Mary
in Birmingham’s Dixie Bowl.
Two other bowl games, the
Alamo at San Antonio and the
American Legion at Los Angeles,
were cancelled, while the pro
gram for a third, the Salad Bowl
at Phoenix, Ariz., was uncertain
after the University of Nevada
withdrew.
The reason given by the Alamo
Bowl sponsors was that San An
tonio was not able to get out
standing teams with outstanding
records for the New Year’s con
test. Missouri and Vanderbilt
were the remaining hopes for the
game but both rejected $30,000
offers to play, a San Antonio
Chamber of Commerce spokes
man said.
Failure to find suitable op
ponents also was given as the
reason for cancellation of the
American Legion Bowl, scheduled
for Los Angeles’ Memorial Coli
seum December 20. The decision
was believed to have been
prompted by a turndown from
North Carolina, virtually the last
major team available for a post
season contest. The Tar Heels
voted to decline all bowl bids.
No explanation was given by!
the Nevada University board for
withdrawal from the Salad Bowl,
but it was believed the move was
taken because of the naming of
North Texas State Teachers Col
lege as the Nevada opponent.
Salad Bowl officials, after re
ceiving Nevada’s acceptance, had
sought to obtain such teams as
Kansas, Missouri, Texas Christ
ian or Baylor os an opponent
but were unsuccessful.
Honolulu’s Pineapple Bowl
game January 1 was set with the
acceptance of a bid by the Uni
versity of Redlands (Calif.) to
meet the University of Hawaii.
Redlands won the Southern Cali
fornia Intercollegiate Football
championship for the third suc
cessive season this fall.
Of the dozen games scheduled
for New Year’s Day, three, in
cluding the Salad Bowl, were still
without complete bills. The Raisin
Bowl at Fresno, Calif., seeks an
opponent for College of the Pa
cific. The Tangerine Bowl at Or
lando, Fla., still needs a team to
meet Catawba.
Oklahoma City’s Papoose Bowl,
scheduled for next Saturday, has
completed arrangements with ac
ceptances from Wentworth Mili
tary Academy and Northeastern
Oklahoma A. and M.
The Boys’ Ranch Bowl at Abi
lene, Tex., has obtained Missouri
Valley and McMurry College for
its game on December 13.
Meanwhile, selections were be
ing made daily by the rival
coaches for the two major bowls
which employ sectional all-star
teams — the East-West Shrine
benefit game at San Francisco on
New Year’s Day and the North
South game at Montgomery, Ala.,
December 27.__
Louis Regards Walcott
As Dangerous Puncher
POMPTON LAKES, N. J.,
Dec. 1 — (ff) — Although it is not
obvious to the naked eye, heavy
weight champion Joe Louis con
cedes that he is easier to hit
than he was 10 years ago —
doesn’t seem to be able to slip
a punch quite the way he did
in his youth.
“I think I hit as hard as when
I won the title 10 years ago
from Jim Braddock,” he said to
day, “But I think I have slowed
down in blocking punches. I get
hit now with punches t used to
be able to get away from.”
Joe brought up the point in
discussing the hitting prowess
of Jersey Joe Walcott, the
slightly shopworn Negro chal
lenger whom he meets in the
24th defense of his title Friday
night at The Garden. What
Louis had to say of his opponent
was about the nicest thing he
has uttered to date about the
father of six children.
“I regard Jersey Joe as a
dangerous puncher,” He said
without a trace of a smile. “You
got to have respect in that ring
for any man who can punch. I
don’t think he’s as good a boxer
as Billy Conn and Tommy Farr
were, but they couldn’t hit the
way he does, either.
“You got to be on the lookout
with him. I’ve seen him fight a
couple of times and he sneaks
those punches in pretty good.”
Coming from the big, solemn
faced man who up to a few
years ago was the prize conver
sational clam, the foregoing
represents praise, indeed. Jer
sey Joe’s hitting prowess had
not previously been suspected.
Certainly the betting fraternity
which has made Walcott an 8-to-l
underdog is unaware of the dyna
mite in the challenger’s fists.
Both men relaxed today ex
cept for the usual road work.
The temperature was 18 above
zero up here in the early morn
ing, and Louis’ jacket was cov
ered with frost when he came
in. The champion plans to box
four rounds tomorrow and to
wind it up with four more on
Wednesday. He will not motor
into New York City until just
before the weigh-in Friday
noon.
GULFSTREAM RACE
TRACK IS CLOSED
MIAMI, Fla., Dec. 1— <*) —
Florida’s prospective glittering
winter racing season opened on
a gloomy note today, when a
strike of horsemen demanding an
increase in minimun purses for
ced Gulfstream Park to announce
that there would be no racing to
morrow and the track wou re
main closed until an agreement is
reached.
The fued between horsemen and
Gulfstream’s management opened
Sunday when some. 200 horse
owners voted to demand that
minimum purses for the 40-day
meeting be upped from $2,000 to
$2,500 and minimum daily purses
—exclusive of stake events—be
not less than $22,000.
Today, after Gulfstream presi
dent James Donn announced that
the track rejected the demand, the
fued broke out into a bitter
name-calling affray in which
horsemen accused Donn of “long
history of unsatisfactory rela
tions” and Donn branding the ac
cusations as “absolutely false.”
You’ll Find The
-TOYS
You Want
At
CHAMPION
DISTRIBUTING CO.
118 Market St.
Wildcat Cage Slate
Lists Tough Quints
The New Hanover High School
Wildcat basketbal schedule, re
leased yesterday by Coach
Leon Brogden, reveals that
there is another tough year
ahead for the team, which last
year copped the Class AA state
title.
The Wildcats will undoubtedly
have to step up the pace of their
practice drills in order to be
ready for their first encounter
of the season, a game with the
Oak Grove Marines, December
15 in the New Hanover Gym.
After the first game, the Wild
cats will move out of town and
up to Virginia where they will
play Newport News and Granby
High School in Norfolk. The
Wildcat-Granby game should be
an interesting one as the Nor
folk cagers were the only high
school team to defeat the great
New Hanover team of last sea
son.
A tentative game with a team
composed of Alumni of the High
School has been arranged for
sometime during the week of
December 22. Playing for the
team will be John Tsantes, Billy
Mason, Johnny and Leonard Mc
Koy, all former cage stars at
the school.
Yesterday afternoon, Coach
Brogden announced that the
House of David Professionals,
who conquered the Wildcats, 49
46 last year, had notified him
that they would be unable to
play the game previously shed
uled for December 26.
Heading the list of conference
challengers who will be attempt
ing to take the state crown from
the New Hanover team is the
Durham High School Bulldogs,
coached by their ace mentor, Paul
Sykes. The Durham squad is re
ported to have every man back
from last year’s starting five,
and will be out to take back the
crown, which they held for
many years. Gene Brooks, first
string center for three years and
Pat Hunt, guard, the Bulldogs
counterpart for Weinie Brown,
will head the roster of conten
ders.
Rocky Mount, with A1 Mc
Cotter, the center who boasted
the best scoring average
the Wildcats in the 1
year, and Alvin Hook. ‘8”
cells in set shots, \ J . '*■
fighting for the crown
The Wildcats, with three
ers back from last y<- ■ 5,.an
five, should have a better r
average team, ano , '."8"
playing as hard a schedou'1’
could be arranged ;n ,h sJle '*
tion of the country. " ***•
The schedule:
Dec. 15—Oak Grove Marin
in Wilmington. ’ ^
19— Newport News in KP,V*.
News e"*>«
20— Granby High in N'nr( „
Jan. 6—Wilson in W:hon °k
—Rocky Mount in Wi|mmo.,
13—Durham in Durham g‘°B
20—Goldsboro in W;lmiri!,.,
23—Raleigh in dak,,- ?'M
2—Fayetteville in Wdminsm
30—Wilson in Wilmington
Feb. 3- Rocky Mourn B
Rocky Mount. *
6—Durham in Wilmington
13—Goldsboro in Goldsboro
17—Raleigh in Wilmington
27—Fayetteville in_Wilmingt0||
WILLISTON PLAYS'
KINSTON TONIGHT
The hard fighting Williston
Tigers will play the Adkins Ne
gro high school of Kinston to
night at the American Legion
Stadium at 8 o’clock in a con
test that will determnie the
Eastern conference Negro high
school championship.
The Tigers yesterday com
pleted final drills for the im
portant conference clash and
according to coach Robinson the
Williston gridders are in top
condition for the title scrap.
According to a ruling of the
North Carolina Negro high
s c h ool athletic association
executive committee, the Ra
leigh school has been declared
ineligible for championship hon
ors and this action leaves Wil
liston and Kinston undefeated in
games played by schools ap
proved by the committee.
Coach Robinson said last
night that a special section of
Legion Stadium will be reserved
for white patrons.
IBBAA APPOINTS
10 COMMISSIONERS
SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Dec. 1—<*)
—Appointment of commissioners
in 10 states to direct operation of
Independent Basketball Associa
tion of America tournamen was
announced today by Lowe M.
Davis, National Commissioner.
At the same time Davis also
announced the date for the second
annual N- tional tournament had
been set for February 29 to
March 6 in Springfield Stover,
Mo., will defend the title it won I
last spring in a 28 team bracket
representing 10 states.
State commissioners and the
sites of the state tournaments as
announced by Davis include:
Wade Yates, Asheboro, N. C.
Davis said regional qualifica
tion tournaments will be set up
for each state. Already North
Carolina has six regionals assign
ed to Fallston, Franklinville,
MountHblly, Boone, Lumberton
»7id Lei and.
AMERICAN LEGION
DEFEATS RESERVES
IN TOUCH LEAGUE
The American Legion touch
football team defeated the Naval
Reserves squad, 7 to 0, in a City
league game at Robert Strange
playground last night.
The Legionnaires scored when
E. T. Auld tossed a ’ong aerial to
Charles Jones who crossed the
goal line. Walter Powell passed
to Brian Mullinix for the extra
point.
Tonight at 7:30 o’clock the
Veterans of Foreign Wars will
play the Spofford Spinners. Wed
nesday night the Fat Boys will
tangle with the Naval Reserves
and Thursday night the American
Legion team plays the Fa Boys.
f fMJfiWSyLVssy
IIKM N
THIS 1111-J
College Cagers Open
Season Here Dec. 11
The Wilmington College Sea
hawks basketball team will play
their first game of the season
Thursday, December 11, with
the Louisburg cagers, Mickey
Katkaveck, college coach, said
yesterday.
The local college aggregation
was accepted into the North Car
olina Junior College Athletic as
sociation at a recent meeting
has received the list of Eastern
Conference clubs the locals will
play this season.
The list includes Louis
burg, Pseiffer, Wingate, Oak
Ridge, Presbyterian, Camp
bell and Edwards Military In
stitute.
According to Coach Katkaveck,
the fast break and the man-to
man defensive system will be
the Wilmington system this sea
son. The college quint will be
DRYPOND GRIDDERS
PLAY ST. MARY”S
AT STRANGE TODAY
The Drypond Tigers of the City
Cadet tackle football league will
play St. Mary’s Gales this after
noon at Robert Strange park at
3:30 o’clock.
The winner of this afternoon’s
contest will play the Pembroke
Cubs next Tuesday night at 7:30
o’clock under the lights at Robert
Strange.
/-COLDS-,
I Per Quick, Soothing Belief
i DEMAND A and O 1
I_Money Back Guarantee |
an average team in height, each
eager standing around 5 ft. u lr
Carl Mason at 6 ft 2 1-2 m
the tallest experienced plave;- oa
the squad. He handled the regu
lar center duties for the NHH$
1945 hard wood aggrega.ion
a team which boasted Billy Ma.
son, Jim Croom Louis Col'n
Johnny McKoy, and Toddv Fen
nell. McKoy worked as a second
stringer behind Carl. The btg
180-pound pivot man has no
played much basketball since
then, however, and is one of the
chief basketeers to who Kathi
veck is devoting attention.
MEW!
Preferred vs’
BY MILLIONS FORCHIITO
SO PURE, SO FAST, I Easy to take. I
SO DEPENDABLE
OA T— _ __1. aweetenedto
StJOSeptl chlMstaaU
ASPIRIN iOtablatatoi I
35c- TrJ 111
SEE OUR STOCK OF BEAUTIFUL
LADIES FALL CLOTHING
Berger's Dept. Store
709 North Fourth SL Dial 9647
TYPEWRITERS
NEW — RECONDITIONED — ALL MAKES
NEW PORTABLES
NEW R. C. ALLEN CASH REGISTERS
ELECTRIC & HAND MODELS
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
TYPEWRITER INSPECTION CO.
E. N. SMALL, Manager
216 Princess St. D‘aI 5093
ALL AMERICAN LEGION
MEMBERS ARE INVITED
— TO AN —
ON THE HOUSE
OYSTER SUPPER
(Slag)
6:30 P.M. Wednesday
DEC. 3
American Legion Home 3rd & < -l|JI k _
jtMUd "tout, ,iy
IWWJhV* <IM ■«! A f
MMMUUiiH annum
«
BLENDED WHISKY
*180. *490
■ PINT ^ */I QUART
THE STRAIGHT WHISKIES IX THIS PRODUCT
ARE FOUR TEARS OR MORE OLD
•TH* STRAIGHT WHISKY• 7VA% GRAIN NEUTRAL SPIRIT*
M PROOF
COBBS DISTILLING CORPORATION
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
t

xml | txt