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The Wilmington morning star. [volume] (Wilmington, N.C.) 1909-1990, December 07, 1947, SECTION A, Image 13

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WAA1 May Bypass
PGA For Tourney
0 DIRECTOR
RAPS SYSTEM
,TL-\\'TA, eDc. 6.—Ath
A . William A. Alex
>:L°; ■ Georgia Tech suggest
mat the National Col
ei’.' Athletic association
;e*13 .. , in on the “bowl
iefore another season
#t“ t participation by mem
te'arTi, to a few approved
'M'''1Sxa,- v- a man very close
ror.tr JJing powers of col
■’hV football and long-time
' the national rules
fiittee cased his argument
pc easing complaint of
®xn ,, h are invited to
:0 P?r . ' p. find all the tickets
50\VlS •
*LV, ..iimittees are con
ducting the. SameR with little
lideratien for the competing
con3 " Alexander told Sports
FA Danforth of the At
TJournal “Especially in
‘ roatter of tickets. Big busi
nessmen in the bowl cities buy
:,p all the G oice seats.
"Unless ' u know Joe or Mor
,-ou cannot get a seat. The
teams that make the game pos
m allowed a fraction of
S‘L thev might expect.Never
there enough for their stu
nts and faculty, not consid
alumni and friends.”
“It is just possible that the
National Athletic association will
extend its investigations into,
bov.: game' and inspect the'
meti'-od of distribution of gate j
receipts and tickets,” Alllexan-.
der added.
21 Came Schedule
Set For S. C. Cagers
COLUMBIA. S. C., Dec. 6 —
rrar.k Johnson's University of
South Carolina basketball quin
tet will play a gruelling 21-game i
schedule during the 1947-48 sea
ton which includes 15 Southern j
Conference feuds.
The Birds, semi-finalists in j
the Southern Conference tourna-1
ment held in Durham last year, |
will make their hardwood debut j
against the Newberry Indians
here on December 15.
By GIL SMITH
Star-News Sports Editor
Officials of the Wilmington
Athletic Association, Inc., were
this weekend awaiting an
answer from the Professional
Golfers’ Association relative to
available dates for a proposed
$10,000 golf tournament in Wil
mington next fall, and it was
| strongly indicated that a fai'ire
i on the part of PGA to reply
with speed would result in a
plan to stage a sectional tourna
ment here without the, golf as
sociation’s blessing if necr
essary.
Alan Marshall, president of
WAAI, last night was noncom
mittal on the possibility of slat
ing a sectional tournament, but
said that the letter sent PGA’s
tournament chairman, George
Schnieter last Tuesday would
probably be the last effort made
locally to get some action from
the pro golf group.
He said the idea of a sectional
tournament, possibly embrac
ing Virginia, Tennessee, North
and South Carolina and Georgia
had been talked by WAAI offi
cials at their last meeting, but
expressed the hope that Schnie
ter would answer the local re
quest favorably and make such
a move unnecessary.
With $12,500 pledged by WAAI
stockholders, the sectional tour
nament idea has merit if PGA
finds it impossible to grant Wil
mington dates for next fall. A
meeting of all stockholders will
probably be called to determine
if all who pledged financial
support will be willing to go
along with the idea.
For the past month WAAI has
had only favorable reports from
the PGA headquarters however.
One letter said Wilmington’s re
quest for tournament dates
would be given full considera
tion, and a phone conversation
between Ed Dudley, president
of the golfers, and one of WAAI
officials was reported to have
ended with verbal assurance by
Dudley that the Port City would
get a tournament in 1948,
Since then however, the Chi
cago offices of the pro golfing
association have been silent
concerning Wilmington’s bid for
a contest.
England is so short of cloth!
today that she is making men’s
ties from wartime RAF escape !
naps and papper collars.
KENTUCKY UPSETS
VILLANOVA, 24-14
CLEVELAND, O., Dec. 6 (U.R)
—The University of Kentucky
put power and deception into a
one-two punch that ripped Villa
inova college of Philadelphia for
| an upset 24 to 14 victory, in the
: First Annual Great' Lakes bowl
; today in Municipal stadium.
The meager crowd of 14,908,
S lost in the confines of the vast
Lakefronf bowl, saw a- bang-up
game by two colleges that
played as if it was the begin
|ning of the football season rath
er than the end.
Sparkling line play by the
Kentucky Wildcats, particularly
[the pivotal work of Jay Rhode
I rnyre of Ashland, Ky., All
Southeastern Conference center
|and tackle chores of Wash
iSerini of Tuckahoe, N. Y., gave
I the southerners a big edge over
I the favored Main Liners.
George B 1 a n d a, Young
wood, Pa., quarterback, was a
tower of strength for Kentucky
and put his team ahead with a
27-yard field goal near the end
of the first quarter. His stellar
play was more than matched by
i left half Bill Boiler of Beaver
| Falls, Pa., who tallied two
| touchdowns — both in the last
i period, and tossed a pass for
(the other one.
j Bob Pilodor of Philadelphia
| was outstanding for Villanova
but was stymied by the stout
Southern line.
Kentucky made it 10-0 early
in the third period when Boiler
j passed to Jim Howe, Ft. Thom
as, Ky., halfback, who scotted
129 yards to tally with an able
I assist by Bill Moseley’s key
block of the safety man.
| The last period was a free
'scoring one, with each team
racking up two touchdowns. Vil
jlanova almost scored in the last
| second of the third quarter, but
the referee ruled the period had
ended before the play started,
and set them back on the 10
yard line.
ECTC WINS THIRD
GOLDSBORO, Dec. 6—UP)—
Fast Carolina Teachers won their
third straight basketball game
tonight, defeating the Goldsboro
All-Stars, 44 to 33.
Fisherman Calls Cast As Partner Catches
37-Pound Rainbow For New World Record
By JACK ROTTIER
NEA Special Correspondent
COEUR D’ALENE, Ida. Dec.
6 —They’re juggling around the
world trout fishing record on
Idaho’s Panhandle, home of the
famous fighting Kamloops rain
bow.
Behind it all is a boast that
might compare with Babe Ruth
pointing to the distant Wrigley
Field bleachers and then swat
ting the ball into it in the 1932
"'.fid Series.
Before retired grocer Wes S.
Hamlet and hardware dealer
Anton Moen, both of Coeur
d'Alene, went to Lake Pend
Oreille just before the season
dosed, the latter wrote a busi
ness Jetter to Clinton Shepherd
jof Rathdrum, Ida.
Shepherd last May 1, opening
day set a new world record by
itaking an even W-pound Kam
loops rainbow from Lake Pend
Oreille.
1 Closing his letter, Moen
twitted Shepherd with: “Hamlet
and I are going to Pend Oreille
tomorrow and spoil your world
I record.”
! Much to Shepherd’s apparent
chagrin. Hamlet and Moen did
ijust that, subduing an even 37
; pound Kamloops a mile out of
.Garfield Bay, near Sandpoint,
after a 15-minute tussle, while
! trolling from behind an out
! board motor. The new record
! trout measured 40 1-2 inches in
I length, 28 in girth.
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them.
The whopper made one big
leap about 100 feet from the
boat, when Moen remarked:
“We’ll have the biggest fish in
the lake if we can land him.”
Two more short runs and the
record- wrecker was brought to
gaff.
Hamlet caught his prize on a
Montague rod,, fishing with *00
feet of Nylon 40-pound surface
test line. A Martin silver streak
lure tricked the daddy of ’enk
all.
For Hamlet, his 13th quest of
Kamloops at Lake Pend Oreille
was charmed. He drew blanks
on 12 previous sorties f o r big
ones. Moen has caught several
whoppers, his biggest being a
28 1-2-pounder last season.
Clinton Shepherd’s record fish
was sent to President Truman.
Hamlet’s was o f f i c ially
v/eighed in at Garfield Bay, and
excitement g r i p p ed Coeur
d’Alene as the big fish was
shown at Moen’s store before it
was taken to Sandpoint for an
other round of pictures.
Wes Hamlet won $500 in prizes
in a Sandpoint contest for catch
ing the largest trout at Pend
Oreille Lake this year.
That’s a big assignment, for
this is the fourth world record
trout taken from the big north
Idaho fresh water lake in three
years.
MEMBERS OF
AMERICAN LEGION
Herbert Costin, Jr., Post
No. 229 Report to Com
mander W. R. Smith,
Hampstead, N. C., at 2 p.
m., Wednesday, Dec. 10th.,
to accord military honors
for the late Private Her
bert Costin, Jr.
MtAtHTH CO- lot. A
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On Top In Southern Conference
CHARLIE JUSTICE (left), University of North Carolina back,
j and R. N. “Rube” McCray, head coach at William & Mary, dis
iplay awards presented to them by the Quarterback Club at Dur
| ham, N. C. Justice was named the most valuable player in the
Southern Conference this season, and McCray the most outstand
ing coach in t)ie conference. William & Mary won the conference
championship. (AP Photo).
North Carolina Soccer
Men Try For Olympics
ANNAPOLIS, Md., Dec. 6 —
Thirty-six soccer players
from colleges in Maryland, Vir
ginia and North Carolina collab
orated in almost two hours of
fast action on Lawrence field to
day in the first Southern
District tryout for United States
Olympic team berths.
Eight members of the Olym
pic team’s regional selection
committee watched the hooters
compete in five full periods for
an initial check on potential
timber for next year's interna
tional games at London.
E. Paul Patton of Philadel
phia, secretary-treasurer of the
Intercollegiate Soccer Football
association, said after the long
workout in chilly weather that
further sessions probably would
be held before an 18-man squad
is chosen to represent the South
ern district.
The collegians finally tabbed
will engage a squad of amateur
soccer players to determine the
district’s entry in subsequent
regional eliminations.
Committee members had
special praise for Hebron Coble
of High Point, N. C., college,
\ and Bill Linz of Loyola, both in
’side rights; Nick Kropfelder of
Loyola, center forward: Dick
j Cleveland of Maryland and
[Charlye Coulter of Navy, half
Ibacks; and A1 Schaufelberger of
[Navy, goalie.
WIN ON NEW SYSTEM
ATLANTA, Dec. 6 —(U.R)_T h e
Sidney Lanier High Poets of
Macon, Ga., today battled the
favored Brown High Rebels of
Atlanta to a 6 to 6 tie in the
semi-finals of the Georgia High
school football playoffs and won
the right to face Richmond
Academy of Augusta in the fi
nals because they penetrated
Brown’s 20 yard stripe twice
while the Rebels got inside the
Lanier 20 only once. It was the
first time the penetratoin sys
tem had been used to decide a
high school game in Georgia.
Star Injun Back Set
For New Year s Tilt
WILLIAMSBURG, Va., Dec.
6.—VP)—William and Mary’s foot
ball team will resume practice
Tuesday for its New Year’s Day
engagement with Arkansas in
the Dixie Bowl at Birmingham,
Ala., Coach R N. McCray said
today.
McCray said the drills would
continue until Dec. 19, when the
team will scatter for the Christ
mas holidays, reassembling in
Birmingham on Dec. 26. Ap
proximately 35 players are ex
pected to make the trip.
Included in the group will be
tailback Tommy Korczowski, the
Tribe’s spectacular breakaway
runner who was out most of the
1947 season with a broken ankle.
Korczowski is expected to be in
top shape for the New Year’s
Day game has been working out
for the past week under back
field mentor Eric Tipton.
Toledo Slugs Wildcats
In Glass Bowl Tilt
TOLEDO, O., Dec. 6. — (4>)—
New Hampshire’s eight-game
winning streak was wrecked on
the rocks of a rugged Toledo
Rocket team today, the willing
but outweighed Wildcats drop
ping a 20 to 14 verdict in the
Second Annual Glass Bowl con
test before a crowd of 13,500.
Tie invaders spotted the Roc
kets to a pair of first-half touch
downs on fine runs by Dick Hus
ton. a twinkle-toed Negro half
back, and then roared back with
two sensational scoring spurts
in the final half to throw a scare
into the twice-defeated Toledo-!
ans.
Huston counted in the first few
minutes from the nine-yard line,
after quarterback Lee Pete had j
tossed four passes good for 481
yards. He wheeled 26 yards
through the line for the next
one in the second period after
a 15-yard roughness penalty had
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By HARRY GRAYSON I
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK, Dec. 6 (NEA.) j
—Wesley Fesler wants it known
that he isn’t picking Michigan
to defeat Southern California in
the Pasadena Rose Bowl, Jan.
1, but admits that a Wolverine
victory wouldn’t surprise him.
j Coach Fesler is in a better po
sition than anyone else to judge.
His Ohio State squad was the
only one to tackle both sides,
was belted by Southern Califor
nia, 32-0, Oct. 11, and by Mich
igan, 21-0, Noy. 22.
Simple arithmetic would indi
cate Southern California is 11
points superior, but not to the
Ohio State All-America end of
1928 and ‘30.'
‘We fell behind early in the
: Southern California game, then
took costly chances that pre
sented the Trojans with scoring
opportunities they ordinarily
would not have had,” he says.
‘'Ohio State was at its peak
against Michigan, and the Wol
verines won on superior agility,
passing and speed.”
Fesler points out that the
types of play employed by Mich
igan and Southren California
are as different as night and
day.
“Michigan Uses the single
wing, depends primarily on its
speed, timing and deception for
offensive effectiveness,” he ex
plains.
“Southern California is a T
formation team, and the basis
of its success is quick opening
thrusts.’’
Fesler opines Michigan will
enjoy an edge in speed and ver
I satility of attack, but adds, cau
! tiously, that Ann Arbor has a
| scrap on his hands. He is posi
i tive that there will be nothing
; easy about it.
Notre Dame went to the
Southern California game for a
battle of T teams.
There again it was a battle of
i lines.
Once again on New Year’s
Day, Southern California’s
chances will hinge on whether
it has the superior defensive
line.
While the Irish did not have
an opportunity to prove it, Notre
Dame perhaps has a margin on
the Michigan line and more
overall speed. That goes even
with Terry Brennan and John
Panelli benched by knee in
juries. Frank Leahy has other
remarkable backs to take up
the slack.
There is a general cry for
younger football officials. The
college game could well use
some young fellows who can
move around. Too many of the
old boys are back year after ,
year. Eastern college officiating ■
was pretty bad this fall. j
The ridiculous rule prohibiting i
Lewis Rare 3-Sport
Star At High School
POLICE GAZETTE
TERMS WALCOTT
WORLD CHAMPION
NEW YORK, Dec. 6.—W—The
National Police Gazette, the ar
biter of boxing back in the days
of John L. Sullivan, announced
in a statement tonight it was
withdrawing recognition of Joe
Louis as world heavyweight
boxing champion and recogniz
ing Jersey Joe Walcott.
H. H. Roswell, publisher, said
a champiouship “Belonged to any
challenger when he demonstrat
ed decisive superiority.”
Walcott scored two knock
downs to none for Louis, He was
in better shape at the finish.
There is no logical reason Louis
should be continued in title
recognition.”
Roswell derided the decision,
calling it the “Worst and most
costly boner pulled in boxing.”
and he also characterized the
scoring system instituted by Vew
York boxing commission' Ed
die Eagan as “Eagan’s folly.”
“I am convinced Eagan should
resign,” Roswell said. “He has
faced one crisis afttr another—
the Graziano case, the Fox
La Motta fight—and has failed
each time to correct the abuses
and injustices done to the sport
public.”
Wolf pack Smashes
High Point By 78-42
HIGH POINT, Dec. 6 —M>)—
| Paced offensively by the 24-point
’shooting of center Harvath, the
N. C. State Cagers rolled over
an outmanned but fighting High
Point College basketball team,
78-42, here tonight.
The High Point five put up a
surprising defensive battle dur
ing the first half, trailing only
by nine points at intermission.
The Southern Conference
champs, however, got rolling in
| the second half to step ahead
easily.
| The lineups:
I N. C. STATE FG FT PF TP
McComas, _ 3 0 4 6
i Ranzino, F. _ 0 1 lx 1
i Dickey, F.. _ 3 6 2 12
Cartier, F _ 12 0 4
; Horvath, C _ 10 4 2 24
Stine, C ___ 13 0 5
! Sloan, G _ 2 12 5
Bartels, G _ 4 4 4 12,
Bubas, G_ 1 0 4 2:
Katkaveck, G _ 2 3 0 7 j
TOTAALS _ 27 24 19 78'
HIGH POINT FG FT PF TP!
Hammond, F, C_ 1 1 5 3 j
Kellam, F _ 0 0 0 O’
Sheets, F _ 5 3 5 131
I Allens, F_0 0 10
MMoran, C __ 10 5 2
I Surratt, C _ 0 0 0 0 j
I Henry, G _ 3 3 5 9I
! Cartwright, G __ 0 0 0 0
PPPrePston, G _ 0 12 1
Iscovitz, G _j_ 3 6 3 12
Mickey, G_ 1 0 1 21
TOTALS _14 14 27 42
Halftime score: N. C. State 33; High
Ran ino, Dickey, Cartier (2), Harvath
Point 24. Free throws missed: McComas,
(2), Sloan, Bartols (4i Sheets (2), Moran
(2), Henry, Cartwright, Preston (2)
Iscovitz (3).
ASKS OWN RESIGNATION
SEATTLLE, Dec. 6—W-Ralph
“Pest” Welch, whose University
of Washington football team won
only three games this season, has
asked tbut he be dropped from
consideration for reappointment
at the expiration of his present
contract as head football coach,
the University announced today
through Harve Cassill, director
of Athletics.
Optometry means literally, eye
measuring.
By GENE WARREN
Star News Sports Writer
Injuries in football have kill
ed the hopes of many athletes
in other sports fields—such as
basketball, tennis, golf, hockey,
swimming, baseball. For that
reason certain players, who are
especially good at one sport but j
only fair at another,are not al-1
lowed to participate in all sports.
Take W. A. Brown, Toddy
Fennell, and Louis Collie for in
stance. They are all excellent
basketball and baseball players,
and have proven against scrub
opposition that they can handle
themselves pretty well on the
gridion. Fennell was first string
quarterback at Hemenway dur
ing his grammar schools veat;
Collie not only made the Tiles
ton grammar school club, but
also starred as a end on one of
the New Hanover High school
junior varsity teams; Brown,
handling the passing roles in
Saturday touch games, has ex
hibited the touch of an excellent
T-quarterback.
Yet Coach Leon Brogden
knows these boys are too small
for football. Brown weights
around 130 pounds, Fennell 155,
and Collie 140. Brogden’s slogan
is why risk boys who are essen
tial to his basketball and base
ball plans in football?
But there are three-letter men
who are risked by Borgden. The
most notable of the crew is Bob
Lewis, an alternate at left end
on the football team; a top
prospect for center in basket
ball; and the likely fellow' to
step into Dunk Futrelle’s shoes
at first base in baseball.
Lewis stands six feet, two and
one-half inches tall, and tips the
scales for the three sports at
size for the three big sports at
NHHS.
But a twist of fate—an arm
injury—may greatly hamper the
Brilliant athletic future for
Lewis. Against Rocky Mount in
October Lew'is’s right wing v.'as
battered in a pileup, and has not
been the same since. A hard
knot has arisen just above Bob’s
elbow a n d is affecting his
basketball playing to a slight de
gree. What it will do in baseball
is the big question mark for
Lew'is and Brogden.
Brogden has told Lewis that
he expects the injury to heal by
next summer. If so the tall
NHHS athlete may gain recog
nition enough to receive an ath
letic scholarship to his favorite
'school, the University of North
| Carolina.
BEARS COP WIN
HICKORY, Dec. 6—1#)—The
Lenoir-Rhyne Bears defeated the
Kannapolis YMCA basketball
team, 55 to 35, here tonight with
Bobby Brown pacing the scorers
with 16 points.
SPORTS
END YEAR UNBEATEN
TALLAHASSEE, Fla., Dec. 6—
(U.R)—Alabama State Teachers col
lege, one of the few undefeated
and untied foolball teams in the
nation, closed out its season to
night with a 7 to 0 win over
Florida State University, a team
that has never won a football
game.
Authorized
INDIAN
DEAC GAGERS SET
• FOR BUSY WEEK
WAKE FOREST, Dec, 6. —
Wake Forest’s basketball team
will be as busy as the prover
bial bee next week playing four
games in the space of only six
days.
The Demon Deacons will wind
up a four-day tour of Virginia
~DEACONS DEFEATED
WASHINGTON, Dec. 6.—
'■-Pi—George Washington t'ni
versity opened its Southern
Conference basketball cam
paign tonight with a 59 to
53 victory over Wake Forest.
and Maryland Monday night
when they face a reportedly
strong Quantico Marines quint.
They opened the trip by playing
Randolph-Macon at Ashland.
Va., Friday night. The second
game on the tour matched them
tonight against George Washing
ton's strong team.
After playing Quantico Ma
rines the team will returm here
Tuesday and Drepare for its
first home contest of the season
with Atlantic Christian College
on Wednesday night. On Thurs
day night Coach Murray Grea
son will take his proteges to
Fort Bragg for a newly-added
game with the 82nd Airborne Di
vision, on Saturday McCrary
Eagles came to Wake Forest for
a return contest writh the Dea
cons.
Undecided
About His Gift?
Come to TAYLOR'S for
GIFTS
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GIVING—
I Choose
Ian
officials of the professional
leagues from working both sides
of the street cost the college
game a lot of good men.
Lou Little suggests schools for
officials.
“Young men with athletic
ability and background, balance
and common sense should be
given an opportunity to learn
how to officate,” says Colum- I
bia’s veteran head man, who is
chairman of the Football Coach-1
es Rules Committee and former
president of the Coaches Asso
ciation.
“Let young officials learn by
watching the best men from the
sidelines.
“They should hold the lines
man’s stakes, not the brothers
in-law of officials who do it.” ,
Professor Little no doubt ,
would like to add that the young '
fellows should be told just what
officials to keep their eyes on.
They’d contract some mighty
bad habits watching some of
j them. ___ _____
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