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The Louisiana Democrat. [volume] (Alexandria, La.) 1845-1918, June 01, 1870, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82003389/1870-06-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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jDWARFD As BIOSSAT3 )TIIE m ORLD IS GOCTER1 RED TOO 1/CITTJ T
VOLUME 25.} ALEXANDRIA, LA., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1870. NTr
THE DEMOCRAT" ispjblished Week
ly, at FIVE DOLLAs per annum, THREE
for six months, payable in advance No
Subscription taken for a less period than
Six Months. !
ADVBRTISEDdENT3 inserted at the
.rste of $1 50 PER SQUARE for the first
insertion and 75 CENTS for each subse
qaent one. Eight lines or less, consti
tate a square. The following are our
rates to yearly.Advertisers:
One( olumn. ............----- $300 00
'alf Column..................-------- 175 00
Thirdof Column................ 130 00
Foarth of Column ............... 100 00
Cards, (occupying space of eight
lines,orlese,) ................. 20 00
Obituary Notices, Marriages, Public
Meetings, Cards of Thanks, etc., to' be
pai0 for as advertisements.
~ Personal cards, when admissible
bargeddouble the usual advertisements.
man· cgipms am-m'
. NEW ORLEANS CARDS.
ESTABLISHED IN 1835
"And the flag of his country ho nailed to
the masc."-.-[Oid Song.
p,
p]
CASSIDY & MILLER, A
SAIL MAKERS,
100 Camp street, corner of Poydras,
NEW ORLEANS,
M ANUFACTURERS and Deakrs in
all descriptions of Canvas Work: p
such as Tents, of all sorts and sizes;
Camp stools, Beds, Hammocks, Tarpau
lins, Wagon covers, Canvas tents, Canvas
Hose, Mill Bandls. &c., &c.
Also keep constantly on hand a large
assortment of American, Foreign and Fan
cy Flags, Burgess, Jacks, Pennants, &c.
Pay strict attention to getting up, in sau
erier style and fiui~sh, every variety of
?lain, Silk or Fine Ornamental Banners,
for military or other companies.
S1 Orders from the country will meet
with prompt attinhion, at the lowest pus
sible rates. [oct 20-ly bd
1iB8AIN3 IN DRY OOODS AND FANCY
ARTICLES.
t_ h111ilip -tore
Near the French Market,
320 ROYAL ST., corner ST. PHILIP,
New Orleans.
-
EL A, OHIAPELLA,
DEALER IN
D BY° G-O ODS,
- Hats and Fancy Articles
at
.Aoptic. P-rice~aj 2
Feblf W4m pcu t
ER1Yr' r? c 1 SMtIT II,
SUCoSo80R8 TO
WHEELlR & FORSTALL,
MANUFACTURERS OF
COGPi, ~ '1 AlD SIIBET-IRON WORK
Always on hand and manufacturing, Cop
per Stills and Worms.
Ohininey., Breechings, Fire Beds, etc.,
built at short notice.
Plastation and Steamboat work promptly
attended to.
(Mechanics' Row,)
MAY~B4LE ST., CORNER OF GIROD,
Jlew Orleans.
oct 27-1y ee
LEATHER and FINDINGS STORE,
Io. 36 OLD LEVEE ST.,
New Orleans, La
rtINSECTION OF THE TRADE
and balyeya generally is specially in
vited to my complete and comprehensive
stock of everything pertaining to the
SHOE U1FACT URING LINE. I keep
eo'etantly on hand the best French and
Ameri''n calf-skins, moroccos, bindings,
topping~, "tc. Hemlock and Oak sole
leather, Engi,h Serges, Webs, Elastic
Gore, Biniag Ribb, , etc. 4[y arrange.
otentu in anrope and in this country ena
10l me to olor the greatest advantages to
86 Old Levee st.,
BDeWeeaindle jnd Cstomhbouse strs.
Ootto. Tr actor
-and-..
Oomimissio1 MerChaBnts,
No. 39 Perdido st.,
Jan.19-m;. NEW ORLEANS
Ipholsterers' 51a terials
WALL PAPeR & CURTAI]N GOODS
N:6h. Camp street,
* 9tf-ly te NEW Ot18ANS
NEW ORLEANS CARDS.
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, I
OF
HARTFORD, CONN.
Assets, .............. . $6,000,000
E. FESSENDEN, ............President
J. F. BURNS ,................Secretary
THIS old antd reliable Company issues
every desirable form of Policy. All
Policies are non-forfeiting. It grants a
loan of 50 per cent. of the premiumn on all
tables, and pays 50 per cent. dividend an
nually on the same "No deduction of
notes from Policies." "It never litigated
a claim." Pays its losses promptly. Cash
rates, with dividends annually; also chil
dreus' endowments.
SOUTHERN BRANCH,
No. 112 Canal street, corner St. Charles, 3
NEW ORLEANS.
GEO. S. DARLING,
JoHN H. CARTER, Manager
General Agent.
REFERENCES :
Glendy Burke, Banker. T. T. A. Lyons,
Commission Merchaut, N. O. Richard D.
Sale, Shreveport Win. Beynon, Mansfield t
Gen. Edward Sparrow, Lake Providence. 1
Martin Rabalais, A voyelles Parish.
W ANTED.-Responsible Agents (to 1
whom liberal cmmissions will be t
paid) in every Parish in Louisiana. Ap
ply to the Manager, or address
P. O. BOX 2050, New Orleans.
Oot. 13, 1869-1y.
DAVID ZABLE. WM. DALTON
ZABLE & DALTON,
DEALERS IN
STOVES, GRATES, HOLLOW-WARE
-and--.
HO USE1JIl .NIjAq&J'G GO S18.4
Manufacturers of
ALL KINDS OF TIN AND JAPANED WARE.
Agents for the Great Philadelphia Cook
ing stove,
"THE TIMES."
11.5..........Poydras St.,..........115
Between Camp and Magazine sts,
NEW ORLEANS
Li" Agents for H. W. John's patent
Asbestos Roofilg, Roofing Felt. R-of
Coating, Preserrvaive Paint, Metallic
Paint acid Asbestos Cement.
Send for Circulars.
dec 1-Gm cr
TO INSURE LARGE CROPS
-USE
Stern's Raw Bone Super-phosphate
-and
FINE GROUND BONE,
The GREAT FERTILIZERS
LOUIS STERN & BROS.,
VEa nu a ot u rers,
OFFICE :
1 ........... Chartres Street.......... 1
New Orleans, La.
dec 1-iy md
C. J. HART B. B. HART
E. J. HART & CO.,
WHOLESALE -DEALERS, IMPORTERS
-AND
CO.srJfI8 8ION ." E W CH.d . YS,
GROCERIES AND DRUGS.
WE keep constantly on hand sugar,
coffee, teas, spices, liquors, segars.
tobacco, Provisfons and all descriptions of
Groceries, Drugs, Dye Stuffs, paints, oils,
varnishes, window glass and
PR tent Medc i1nea.
Nos. 73, 7, 1, 77 and 79 Tchoupitonlas st,
NEW ORLEANS.
oct27-1y cl
LANDRETH'S GARDEN SEED
-GROWN BY
DAVID LANDRETH & SON.
T HE attention of Merchants, Planters
and Gardeners is reqne.-ted to, one of
the largest and nost complete assirtment
of fresh and reliable seeds ever offered in
the South, and for sale in quantities to
suit purchasers. Garden Almanac and
Catalogue mailed free on application.
E. F. VIRGIN,
IDealer 1in seeds,
98 Gravier Street,
NEW ORLEANS
NEWTON RICHARDS,
No. 162 CUSTOMIHOUSE ST.,
Between Dauphine and Burgundy streete,
NEW ORLtANS.
Stone a red ]r[rblle
OR all bnilding, purposes, including
.IONUMENTS, GRAVB STONES, MARBLE
FLOOR TILE,
furb and Flag Stoo0 , etc. Hydraulic
Cement. Depot for sale of Richard.'
Cape Liie-a superior quality for all the
purposes of sugar plautews, Masons, etc.,
manufactared at his MaRBLE Quasus, Mo.
nov. 10, '69-1y cl3
TO PLANTERS, MERCHANTS & GAR
I pENtRSI
MAUPHY'B SEED STORE,
S No.76 GHAVIR StiaRiT,
NEW ORLEANS
DURE and Fresh Seeds of every des
.L cription, suitable for planting the
present seboo, at lowest pricese by the
8 dozen, rhnited or thousand. papers, or
bulk. Wtiitjd Philadelphia grown
Sseedse Send br Almanac.
W, -A. MAUPAY,
76 Gravier st. between Tcbosp itotgl and
8 MBzlegazinibts, - Ja(G4lft E
NEW ORLEAN S CARDS.
A
d ' '..- 3 '
f -
BUCK'S BRILLIANT
I MOST DURABLE 1
MOST ECONOMICAL!
LEAST COMPLICATED!
MOST EASILY MANAGED! V
HIlE BRILLIANT was awarded the
FISTr PREMIUM. after actual trial in
the field, at every St. Louis Fair since
1865.
After two days actual trial at the Mi
isiana State Fair, the Briliant was a li
ed the Gold Medal for baking the best
o bread with the least fuel in the shortest
e time. +
Use no other Buy no other ! c
Sole Agent,
No.49 CAMP STREET,
NIw OIRLEANS
-DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF-,
COOKING and Heating Stoves, Plain
and Japaned Tinivwre, Stamped Ware Ii
iriand H1ouse Furnishing Goods of every des
Scription.
Sept. 22, 1869-ly. S
t
S. L. JAMES..C. B. BUCKNELR..1OM BY'U1M
James, Buckner & Co.,
Co t4;t' n. actors
5 -and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
S MTANSFACTrInRS OF
i COTTON AND WOOLEN G,)ODS,
if - CO'"TON YARNS,
Boots, Shoes, B:trrels, liogheads and
Bricks,
NO. 140 GRAVIER BT,
3 Sept. 15-1y. NEW ORLEANS
J.S. IIOY. WM. J PATTISON. JAS. M. JAMISON
e JOSEPH- HOY & CO,,
Successors to
CARROLL, HOY & CO.,
Cotton]_ Factor"
-and
General Gommission Merchants,
No. 36 Perdido Street.
NEW ORLEANS.
Sept. 1 1, 189-1y.
FIRST CLASS. JOURNALS ONLY
J. Curtis Waldo,
ADVERTISING SOLICITOR,
IT ofice with.
J. Win. Davis, Real 'Estate Broker,
85 St. Charles st.,
iS (Masonic Hall.)
New Orleans
S Rrws~E To-M.'ssrz. Townend 8& Ly
man. mn Seml. Smith' &. :n.. & i." . \Walihe.
tr, R: L. M'NIoIT. LEE IIOWEI.I.
of R. L. McKNIGHT & CO.,
Wnole.ale Dealerr in Foreign and Do
mrnestic
,, Fruits, I1uts,Etc.
--and
GENERAL COMMiSSION MERCHANTS,
41 Front and 42 Fulton sts.
New Orleans, La.
S' Consienments of Produce solicited
Sand.ord'rs prumptly attended to:
dec 15-6m cuc
'7,. CARPET WAREH OUSE.
A BROUSSEAU & CO., TMPORTERS
to 19 CARTI-Ir:S ST.,
ad New OClleans,La.,
OFFER for 'saele at low price.--Carpet
Sing, English and Americ:u, of all
kinds. Floor Furniture and Enameled Oil
Cloths. MIatting, 5l0~ib llsChiina, 100pieces
Cocoa Window lrAdes, Tubhle, ad Piano
S Covers. Crumb .Clothe, Driage.t Linen
and Felt. Curtains, Lace, Reis, Worsted,
Damask, etd. Furniture Coveripg. Linen
and Cotton Stripes. Cornicee Bands, Pins
., etc. nu I6ly
8 Camp St., New Orleans,
E WATCHMAKER,
AND DEALBLS INt
lic Fine Watches, wevlry, Si: . are & Sectacles.
hALSO
c-. SAMPSON, s. a.. .aPsoi
S. (LateC C. . Sampson) "
E, Furniture and Chairs,
. .33 and 35 Royal st.,
S Sep. 29-1Y. (20) NEW ORLEA8S
the .
he IIV;ATE- BDOARDING.--Pleasant
or . and well ventilated Reurms, with
nor without--Board, can be" had at. No,
234 Canal Streit, Codruar of Frauklin,
SNew OrleansL,'a. Best ofrderences
given, Terms moderate.
WHO WILL CARE?
When we lay beneath the daisies,
Underne.lth the churchyard mould,
And the long grass o'er our faces . t
Lays its fingers damp and cold ;
Wihen we sleep froml cre and sorrow,
A nl the ills of early life-- ill
Sleep to knlow no sad to-morrow,
With its bitterness of strife--
Who will carel i
Who will come to weep above us, W
:LyingRoh! so white and~4till,
Unde:r.,vatlh the skies of summer,
When all nature's pulses thrill, ' ti
To a new life, glad and tender
Full of beauty, rich and sweet,
All the world is clad in splendor, c1
That the years shall e'er repeat,
Who will carel tc
Who will think of white hands lying F
On a still and sileunt breast,
Never more to know of sighing, tl
Ever more to know of rest? t
Who will care No one can telrlus,
But if rest and peace befall, hi
Wjil it matter if they miss Its,
Or if they miss us not at all:
Not at all ?
it
SUIED.
A WVrFE'S STORY.
Can a woman hinder fate? And bi
could I hinder or stop the tide of love a
which came into my heart for Allan
Starr? Did I not know the man as
well, better than those who warned a1
me against him ? If he was in the di
wrong, then so much the more need of
a love strong as death to set him right,
How could I throw down that which
had beein sent to crown my life and,
above all, how could I turn from him,
since every step but increased the dis h
tance which might lie between us foi
"all eternity "l
Once, junt-oince, he doubted me. He *
had heard that friends were trying to U
influence me against him, annd in the
heat of his nmad passion he came up to is
see me. Anger, intense auger, and
desperation were in his blaziig eyes
and the fiercest" reproach upon his a
haughty lips, as lie faced me, the first n
time he ever frowned upon me in all "
my life.
"So you have given me over, like the "
rest of them ? I thank you," lie said, 1h
in freezing tones.
"II What do you mean, Allan," I I
asked.. .:
"I mean that the one who dtar'e to hi
speak words which shall take you away
from me, must be brave enoughto face I
death itself; for I will-"
I sprang up alud covered his quiver- e
ing lips with both my hands.
"Don't say it, Allan," I cried. "I ti
am yours always. Oh, do keep back '
the wicked words !"
He caught me in his arms and burst e
into tears.
I believe I never saw a man break t
down-wholly before, and I never want "
.to again.' It was frightful to see my
handsome, brave lover so shaken withb
stormy sobs. But I knew then how .
well he loved me; ahl! I knew then. 1
When he was quiet, he made me go.
down upon my knees, and, with my
hand lifted towards heaven, swear that I
I would be his forever, in spite of all I
gimat the whole world might say. I
was glad enough to do it; afterwards, t
he added, with his hand elasping mine
and both raised, "As I do by thee, so
may Divine Justice do by' me hence
forth," though his terrible earnestness
made me shiver a little. I was thank- I
ful to feel that we trusted each other I
at last and were past all doubting for I
ever.
We were married soon after, and our 1
life began together.. I knew wrell
enough what mine would be. I had
not.come to a path full of soft, fragrant 1
flowers. It was to be a fearful, if not
a lonig struggle-likely both; for, ei
ther I must turn the current of mny dar
ling's life, or' we should go down to
- g.ther. No earthly power could sepa
rate us.now. But I was strouig in the
great lovrI bore him and my heart
never once faltered.
For a mouth after our muurnage be
came home regular-his apparent oc
culptatioln was lead clerk in a well
known firmn; hbut I knew, oh-pity! that
his real emloymelnt was far enough
remnloved front anythling as honorable
as that; but then hlie began to return
later, until one, two, three and some
times four c,'cloek would strike with
out lbringing him.
I had resolved at first that I would
always remain hp until he came, think
ing that I might thus have more lold
upon hibn. My business was to save
hIim. Nothing w Ms too hard to be done
if I might buit reach that goal at last.
As I said, hlie began to return later
now, and tlhere grew to be a haggard
fok uipon his.face which it- was dread
ful to see, Bince I knew, only too well,
what brought it thlere. But I:-tried to
" be patient; .and whe.ver he. cane,
was carefal not t6 make the slightest
g allusion to thelateness of the hour. It
.would not do with lIim. We sat dowd
t to supper, for I phrsstedT"in having it
Sinvatiabl at:rhis ro~ib4 tfh9ugl I
' have tieehihel~ o aetli ry me a aiy:
a time -when be i1oked at -me steadB1
hatbs oitailFa. way of 'oog, be·~~ t~
tell tme his thoughts, and I pretended at
not to notice while F'attended to his ep
wants._ . m
It is an awful thing for a woman to
see the husband of her love goingdown fu
steadily, but surely, before her fright- m
ened eyes, and she powerless to save. tli
I hatl wondered once bowrmiserable, li,
illtreated wives, whose husbands were er
scarcely fit to live, could cling to them; in(
but thougl4 Allan was tender and kind ge
when with me, I could understand now,
by ¶ny own heart, how it was that they thl
bore everything rather than separa- pr
tion. . th
A 3year went by, and no visilble ba
change came; but the constant anxiety lhi
told upon my face. I wanted to keep
the signs back, but I could not.
Friends noticed it, and among them ht
the aunt who had taken my dead mo- st
ther's place. She had never liked my ro
husband; and the anniversary of our tl
martiage she came, in solemn state, to tl
"inquire into matters," as she tprmed of
it. tl
"You are looking pootly, my child," na
she said, opening the subject at offce. of
"Your marriage is, perhaps, unhappy?" w
"There could not be a kinder Ihus- th
band titan Allan," my face flushing in iS
a moment. "He has never spoken a ea
harsh word to me." _ h
"But something has worn you to a m
shadow," she uent on, ignoring my in- in
dignation; "and we all know that Mr. Im
Starr is not what he ought to be." ' at
That was more than ainy wife should to
hear tamely. I rose at once. li
"Such words must neither be ad- w
dressed to his wife, nor spoken under im
his rpof," I said, angrily. tl
"My honme is open to you, neverthe- at
less," site urged, with her keen eyes, bh
which I hated, because' I feared them, ea
uponnmy face. of
" My home is here, where my heart
is;" I retorted. "I desire no other,"
-and with that our interview closed. sa
Allan heard in some way that .my w
aunt had called; and he would not be te
satisfied until I had told him her exacjt si
words. .to
"Site is right,"/ be said, bhtterly. m
I" You. would be far better off under at
hier roof thitan under mine." n
I knew he did it only to try me, for in
he had not the ghost of a fear that 'I al
should choose my home away from to
him. , . t,
"I did not think it fit to tell her so," p
I replied. ct
" But you believed it! You believ- w
ed it, then 1" l
His breath seemed to stop with the b
intensity of his desire to read what n
was really in my heart, and ihe would is
have wormed the truth from me what- it
ever it had been. ti
"No, I did not believe it, Allan," I Il
responded, quietly, meeting and an- e
swering the questioning doubt which
for the moment had leaped into his
eyes. Whterever you are taking me to, w
your own soul tells you I am power- o
less, and must from choice follow." n
" You are a good, true angel," he f
said, with a strange tenderness upmn I
t his lips; but though I was certain he e
i loved me with a strong man's strength, o
he did not, alas I love m'e well enough
to leave the gambler's den which was a
e fast drawing him on to ruin.
Another yeao went By, another year
of.anxious dread iud sorrow, and still
s another year was added to it, and all
that love could suggest or ingenuity
r invent had failed in accomplishing my
I rpose. I was forced to acknowledge
thisc, and the admission made me tream
r ble. Was I indeed, then, to go down
Swith this man to whom I was bound by
all the ties which can bind a human
Sheart to that of Qnothler, down to an
Sendless perdition V Or could I break
- lle cdrd and let him drift on alone ?
Drift on, out into the lonesoam, bouand
Sless sea which swallows up its victims
Sso pitilessly and leaves no sign I
, "No, no," I cried, with my hands
t clasped over miy horror stricken yes ;
to shuat out the pietite which nmy imag
e ination so widely portrayed.
T Th fourth year after our marriage-
1 four years seems like an eternity to
t travel such a road asI had been trav
1 eling-Allan came hIome at dusk; and
e while I wondered what had come over
a him to bring up the new and astonish
-ing extltation which I saw npoih his
- face, he led me into the library and
stepped before a painting of myself,
d 'which had beenr one ot my wedding
- presents troarlbir
" Four years ago that wias on exact
e likeness of my wife," he, saidc Shea
e has changed since then."
"But little, I trust," I answered.
r " She became my Trife freely;" he
d went on; "knowlig well that I was
I. what the world calls, truly enough, a
I, wicked ma L."
to " Always goed~tame,Isaid, tnhrough
,1 my tears, loaying wty ' tli .tutingiy tsi
t I his. ,
it 'fAways.h croel to yea, y lov e
siaenche thiooght aiore of hib own ohio,
seea pha than of ye3rpoarotners, 4sjsi.e
iIare.a titt tge # ll Vrhois ')ed sh
s annsia heav,; 4; 'S'o t ls. sa
~briv1 by qnme4~i
~ F~sr;w4Ir
ed and honest; and thii-is my Ne Ygar's
sa present to -you, best and trueat ofsto
men."
to I was sobbing in his arms, so thank- a
rn ful and happy, I thought heaven itself ýý
t- must have fallen to my- t. Our lit- o
'e. tie child, who is fast getting towards
e, ilis teens, would never believe his lath
re er had ever been other than te best of ap
a; men. as, indeed I hardly. wtinld 'my- t
d self! wi
w, I am thankful, every iaty of "my life, P
iy that I listened to my own heart's: 8'i
a- promptings, instead of the counsel of
those who meant, I know, to ,help me, for
Ic but who would-have ruined us Both of
ty had their wishes been fulfilled.: feo
- No Ow~ LIVES U.TO HIMSELF.-Goed ei
n has writteti upon every flower that wil
o- sweetens the air, on every breeze that val
y rocks the violet, on every rain drop
ur that moistens the sprig of moss, upon.
to tle-ocean that washes the white sand
ed of the shore, upon every penciled shell. thi
that sleeps in the caverns of the deep, ,
I" ye, upon the mighty sno itself,, "Done in
e. of you shall lives into yourself." And
were, we wise enough to understand
s- these works, we should find that there
in is nothing, from the cold stone in the
a earth to the meanest creature that
breathes, but in some way or another,
a ministers to the ltppiness of some liv- brI
i- ing thing. Is it not reasonable that cre
Lr. man, to whose pleasure the whole ere- aid
ation, from the crimson-tipped flower an
.ld to the shining 4tars Up in the spangled by
heaven, continually do miuister-man, tin
d- who has the power ofi causing deeper ph
icr misery or higher happiness tbqj any- ov
tling on earth-man, who can act like ter
e- unto God, if he will-is it not'reasona- ta.
,s, ble that he 'should live for the noble cl
n, end of living, not.for. himself, but for l i
others? .
urt t
SSHAKE OFF tHME ORgiLD.--Ff Ia the
dl. season of health we strive to shake the
ny World off, it will. 4liqg to us most no
be- tenaciously; but when,, in the hour .of 09
Lct sickness. and trial, and death, we strive o
to cling to it, it will invariably Bhboke of
ly. qs off. As the separation must come
ter sooner or later, un}ess we cast it off
now, it will spurn as hereafter.- 'Most
for men, ttheir cost, wait for the latter it
.ýI alternative; but those who adopt the
mi- former, find, to their shaprise and' joy, ,
that they have removed from their
n," path one of the chiefobstacles and dial
culties ot dying. No one ever traveled to
iv- with alacrity to Heaven with the world
lying heavily on his heart; the incum- b
be brance once laid aside, and the Jour
tat ne'y through the valley of the'shadow at
ll is one of comparativg ease. The toll- .ti
at- ing pilgrims in'the world need but lit- to
tie baggsng for their journey; and the al
I less they have the better when they
in- cross the river. g1
ich t
his THE Taus MAN.-He is a trae mans
to, who will never swerv6 from the path t
er- of duty to gain aworld of wealth or a
name of gldty; who respects alike, the t
he feelings of the #lch and the poor, the
on honorable rnd fthi hnmble; who is a
he careful nor to speak ah unkinad word, si
rth, or use a harsh expression to his ser- M
gh vant or his lord. Wherever you -may tI
mns meet him, he is the same kind, accom- t1
modating, aodbtrnsive 'individial.- ti
ear In him are'the elements of true' ad $l
till uindefiled ,eligion. lie never -takes a
all ste thht the laws of God condemn, nor p
itiy utters a word intentionally to pain the 1 tl
my earof heart or man. Be like him;
dge then you will prepared to live or 4ie, .
uit- and bath in living and dying,yon serve
wn the Lord. . ' t
by ---'-i'--- 1
a For R KInDs r R DiaDEts.--ole
an ridge tells is of foui kindp of reades .
oak The ftist ,like th~e oar-saI -- their
ne? reading like the sand, ruitlxig in agd
nd- then running oat, andnOat Teaving al
ine vestige behind. The econid like the
sponge, which imbibes everythieg, on- .
ads ly to return i in .the amine eatp, or
ies; perhaps dirtier. Tihe third, Jike ajel- t
tyg- is-bag, allows the pure.to pass .pway,
and retains only the drege and the re:
e- fuse. The fourth, like the slaves in
to the mines of Goleonda, eastipg..asde
aV, all that is worthless, and keeping only .
and the diamonds,and the.gems. We_
ver should see to it that we arelike the'
ih- latter class, gathering richeast from alu'
his w"c'read, .
.a TaRES PLEtsUzES.--The ODnlplea.
f, ures that, noe'er lbTy are the. of tihe
Lng mind. They are increased ,b it
tiac , improved'b *.et.ie d
Bite strengthened by en syni t.
never stitea ow p4 btia % ,
were, from an-;atersa' fotaita n of
'he rinhtand sparkling water. fimtcean
noe etkhnge the, nor eoiialo
was their ifinitev$dlety. .. < ,- . ,
:, a .
M. eajnine p.y..y,,s as
agh white rabber, i
y inutdM intI toySis3
Irr a~tbid
't~e
11004½ -- ~
aeb
Uis~fsI ~ad : sr _.
Wink at small 1ijudeant*i hau
avenge them. If;d t6le
bee, you tinow &6*i th I4
of one enemy yod: mio n ita m.
_Scrcws wdhlens bjegt to a are
apt to worlk lools i so}s }tatd
the screw h`tleM
with tlhfiok if .
put o') ih ia
andb
forms of4+ais~fe,ý % ~ ¶~
Of ansggwi w ,06
few silool t
whole in bucket, let I stand one dey
etposed to the San. vie mai bScop
will then revealsoatlesstim numberiadud
various forms of lifb ... ,
RAISED 1A7PSEL~jdt of
5i*eet milk, one heaping tesspteI .ot
butter, threeu eggs, at tableapobafal of
thick brewer's yeast, one qa.o i ur
and another teacqpful of .wsta, tlk z
in which is dissolved a qaeat e
teaspoonful of soda. et.i:
very light, andl toen
wales . Serve tot, wi4 b'Bitt
sugar.
ToAst AND Casaes>3U .O SllB t
bread half an inch t ick; pare b -the
crust, and toastit kveryuightlyoebae -
side. Cut a aieseofabisesattrkste f
an inch thick, not so big as' ie i"ied
by half an -jachk- nd veslMl tdes 'F
the mind, lay it sar the -tauti l t<b ad
phlic'on a fat tit plate, sad piutei "
oven ten minutes or so. 1li# gear.
ter ofa tepoobhMti of salt a4n *~i
tard sprinkle of pepperg tirl ifatothe
cheese, qnd you w aill haveri`i g.
luncheon.i
When a cement:ita sto aas i al
temporary purpose, aitfor lnutian -in'
ma4sqg the erkfor .toppwfot e
perfectly air and vipot tigbt,. t: 1l .
not do to .eaplpy - Wdbld Wr
camea very .basd, a :the a gbthr
oil and lead cpomps wud ois4g ,
other kinda,"sew* a W asE :mrt 1st,
which are wawfoedd, by many aleba hl t
vapors.. The b .et 0naenti.
ues is red lesi,tr flek:ly .
tsharage, mixed, with. Oýauiak Z1
nine. ThiN hardena eVNI, huf
when required cafs svd
TREATxZNT O C ,.r
tare delivere at
reace, he hsaye ia
saubject: "My
been to take ot) grg 4(
and ihe ground big,j
tion the second crop will e
the frat. This I pflow u
about one half the seed, will
fIllowl pingispring1 swvhe %4 :
ground and.go c l.lsethis
good cryp. Whepatbtsrual~
d again the cloter seed is
to the surface, and r
better 'stocked' watks4lpiitt
a the seed 4I ba*wn.:' - ;
a LTQUED iL ktX GIL
a pint of boling n m
s, helve, and bol
- aolyed. Ainotherl -t
9 the best glue in It g
- that being done, _ w
- stirring, }B oae
d Keep well cbrke,'ih :y =
a 9ther1-A useful ;gle sp
r pers together Aonly
e the tongue, is tia I9d .'
; Ive 1 poundof glan or
B water, s nd alf a pofan ri. broaw`- i .
5 5e5!, and bpiltlmarmrpthe M6abeja
to cake.: 1y pouwhin I ao~ spe.as~
bedomessolid.wts. e .
5* NEuRitaiG-8b8thtide ehite We
it pabise, af the i~Pi;~b-O a ar~;
ui1els Isr WIMnA
me camphor water, tob~estea -
Dr sereidakIrUM'atst.&t*sC
1. utes, s a th ln nain We rt
once. Htlf a edhlbt* d
'' have asi et tried time reseeip
le ted. In .
'y anberpi
,* lrate habcsut g,.
ull sal-ammoul. IA w 1
liev bea Jsi e li
a takew
ay
rtn- Gbtsjwotild 4
ber
.3I*

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