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The Louisiana Democrat. [volume] (Alexandria, La.) 1845-1918, July 22, 1874, Image 1

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A. B3.RACI-AL) ' TEE WORLD IS GOVER~T7CE TOO MTTOF. " :(FtL.ERE
VOL. 29._ ALEXANDRIA, LA., WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 1874. NO5
_ ... . ". . . .m - I Im' Ii ll, I ,Ium I n 4 .. . l
Ie jemocvtrat.
TERtMSs
THE DEMOCRAT is published Week.
ly, at FOUR DOLLAItS per annum
Two DOLLARS AND IFrTY CENTS foi
six months, PAYABLE IN AD.
VANC E! No subscription taker.
for a less period thlan six mouths
ADVEitTISEMIIENTS inserted at the rate
of ON. DOLLAR per square for the
first insertion and FirFTY CENTS foi
each subsequent one.
E.rnT lines or less, (BREVIER) Consti
trte a square.
OnrruA lv Notices, Marriages, Publie
Meetings, Cards of Thanks, etc., t(
be paid for as advertisenments.
tSom PnasoALr Canis, when admisl
sible, charged double the usual adver
tisine rates.
ALEXANDRIA.
FERGUSON & S0HNACK,
(FORMERRY LEVIN & FERGUSON,:
r1
Watchmakers and Jewelers
SOLE AGENTS FOR
The Howe Sewing Mchi nes
May 28, 1873-tf.
JQNS IOSRHNTIAL
DEALER IN
DRY GOODS
AND
FAMILY GROCERIES!
E ardcware
0 re o.okery
Corner og Seoond and Murray Sts,
ALEX 4NDRITA,
IInfllDuIA. CBB nYYILU
RED RIVER
-and-
NEW ORLEANS LINi
-OF
United States Mail Coaches
A CONCORD COACH WILL LEAVE
Alexandria on TUESDAYS, THURS
DAYS and SATURDAYS, at 10 o'clock A
M., making close connections at Red Rivet
Landing with the magnificent steanieri
Katie, Frank Pargoud and Natche2
for New Orleans. Returning-will leavE
Red River Landing on SUNDAYS, WEI)
NESDAYS and FRIDAYS, on the arrival
of the above Packets from New Orleans
arriving at Alexandria 7 o'clock the neIx
morning.. B. H. PETERSON,
March 4th, Proprietor.
Moses RLosenthal
. DEALAR IN
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES
HOSIERY,
RARDW ARE, CUTLERY, ETC.
* FRONT ST.,
S4 8. 2INUBS' OLD STAND
ALEXANDRIA, LA.
J J, LEVIN
CONFECTIONEF
· C(UNDER TOWN BALL,)
ALEXANDRT)
Dr. A. COCKERILLE
PRAOTIOES HIS PROFESSIO~
-IN
OIFICP.:
Second St., Between Fish and Ellio
VIOK'S FLORAL GIUIDI
FOR /874.
TWO HUNDRED PAGES; FIfI
hundred engravrings and Col.,re'
Plate. Published Quarterly, at 25 crs
yvear. First number for 1874 just is
, . A German edition at thl lain
price. Address,
JAMES VrICK,
9 Rochorter, N. 1
MISCELLANEOUiR z .
-and
Grand Ecore Weekly Packet
FOR GRAND ECORE, MONTGOM1E
RY, ALEXANDRIA, PINE
VILLE, NORMAN'S,
BARBIN'S
and
/LL TI' Y" L./1INDIN'GS !
The Al Magnificent and Fast Run
ning Passenger Steamer
BART. ABLE:
DICK SINNOTT............MASTER
GEO. C. HAMILTON,..........Clerk
L EAVES NEW ORLEANS EVERY
Saturday at 5 P. M. Returning
leaves Grand Ecore every TUESDAY
evening, and Alexandria every WED
NESDAY at 12 M. For Freight or
Passage APPLY ON BOARD.
DURING THE LOW
water seasotn, tihel Wl
BART. AIILE will be replaced by the
Al light draught
Steamer Sabine
R. HARDTNER,
BOOT
and
LEVIN'S ROW,
.'3fl.&' 8,,rs .,1 AL.BE MXr I.A 1
A LARGE
stock of Fine
Calf Skin and
Morocco a l
ways on hand. REPAIRING DONE
WITH NEATNESS and DISPATCH -
CHEAP FOR CASH.
The Crescent Spectacles
IMPROVE YOUR SIGHT.
THE CRESCENT SPECTA
cles hlw offered to the
Public are guaranteed super
lor to all others in tho market.
L'For clearness and distinctncss
of vision they are unrivaledh. Trsdear)
the total absence of pri ,atic e
colors and refractory rays always fonnd ii
Pebbles renders them especially desirable
Being ground with great care, they are
free from all imperfections and itnpirities
They are mounted in gold, silver, shell
rubber and steel frames and will last ttilan
I years without change. For sale only b1
oar Agents.
Ferguson & Schnock,
Jewelors and Opticians, are Sole Agen it
Alexandria, La.
PPNone genuine without the trade
mark stamped on every pair. Manufac
tured by
FELLOWS, HOLMES & 'LAPP
NEW YORK.
LOOK for TRADE MARK. No PED.
DLERS EMPLOYED.
WA.RPATH,
rWILL MAKE THIS
season at "Wellsawood"
- at $25 the season, payable the First oe
December next, and $.1 to the groom
Due bill for the season to accompanJ
the mare. Mares kept in fine grasi
pastures with water, under good fence.
free of charge. If desired, fed on grair
at $2 per week, payable when taker
away.
ERNEST ILARD)TINR,
-and
Shoe Maker
PINEVILLE, LA.
ALL WORK DONE NEAT ANI
DURABLE, AT REASONABLI
SRATES.
DRAINAGE PUMPS
PUMPS, SEPARATE, OR WITH EN
gLine, Boiler and EVERYTHING COa,
PLETE.
PUMP 100 to 100,000 gallons pe
minute.
PUMP sANDs, GRAVEL, M.UD AND GRIT
TY SUBSTANCES..
PUMPI' MORE WATER with same power
SPUMP MORE WAT ;-c:'ccOld!iug to cOSt
Are superior to any 'LUMP made.
Send for Circular of Andrew's Centri
ffugal Pumps and Machinery. In .usi
by the U. S. Government and all over
* the world.
WMB. D. ANDREWS &- BRO.,
S414 Water Street, New YQrI
SUBJSCRIBE FOR
THE DELMOCRIAT
___ ;oetioa,1.
THE BROKEN VOW.
BY C. T. THAYER.
Hark! the gay pDa:l is ringing,
The bridal is o'er,
And the hope which I fostered
IMay flourish no more.
See! see! all rejoicing
Together are gone,
And have left mei distracted
Heart-broken-alone!
Yet one there, the brightest,
Where all are so bright
Whose heart seems the lihtest,
Where all hearts are light;
Though her eye dances gaily,
Thongh smooth is her brow,
There's a barb in her bosom
A BROKEN Vow!
ln the pomp of her bridal
She thinks of me yet;
Tho' her lips have renounced me,
She cannot forget.
Yet think not I blame her
'Tis Fate is my foe;
May It grant her that comfort
reipts.
CHICKEN SALAD.-Boil or roast a
nice'fowl. When cold, cut off all the
heat, .and chop it a little, but not
very small; cut up a large bunch of
celery, and mix with the chicken.
- Boil four eggs hard, mash and mix
them with sweet oil, pepper, salt,
mustaid, and a gill of vinegar. Beat
this mixture very thoroughly togeth
er, and just before serving pour it
' over the chicken.
FRIA"'s OMELETTE.-Boil eight or
i nine apples to a pulp, stir in two
ounces ,of fresh butter, an d add
pounded sugar to taste. When cold
add an egg well beaten up. Then
butter a deep baking dish, and the
sides also. Thickly strew crumbs of
bread so as to stick all over the bot
tom and sides. Put in the mixture,
and strew bread crumbs plentifully
over the top. Put it into a moderate
oven, and when baked turn it out and
put sugar over it.
VEAL OLIVES.-CUt some very thin
slices of veal rather tvide, but not
more than three or four inches long.,
lay a very thin slice of flt bacon on
each, then a layer of forcemeat, a lit
tle shalot sliced thin and fine as pos
sk ible, with pepper, salt and cayenne,
a roll them round and fasten each se
e curely with a small skewer, brush
g. them with egg and fry them a nice
brown. Boil a few mushrooms,
S pickled or fresh, with half a pint, or
as much as your olives will require,
D of brown gravy, pour it round them
garnish with egg balls.
STOMATO CATsUP.-Take half a peck
of tomatos, wash and slice them; put
them in your preserving kettle, and
let them stew gently until quite soft,
but do not stir them. Strain the
- juice through a sieve, and pour it
back into the kettle. Add twenty
four cloves, half an ounce of all
spice, half an ounce of mace, salt and
cayenne to your taste. Set it on the
a fire, and let it boil until reduced to
f half the original quanity. The next
day strain out the spice, and to every
pint of juice add a gill of vinegar, and
s bottle for use.
MAGDALEN CAKEs.-Take half a
pound of butter, and let it soften in
' steam; stir it with a wooden spoon
° for a good quarter of an hour, until
it is reduced to the consistency ol
n cream; incorporate with it then, one
by one, six eggs; add half a pound
of grated sugar, a little orange-flower,
or grated lemon-peel, and, after all.
mix with- it one pound of figur.
Work well your paste, so that you
can roll it out with a rolling-pin,
Make your cakes of any convenient
size, and arrange them upon iron oi
" tin plates, about half of the thickness
of your thumb; wash them with the
yolk of an egg, and bake them in -
very moderate heat, so that they may
remain in the oven half an hour.
VARIEOGATED JELLY,--One quart 01
Sclehr jelly, half a teaspoonful of pre
pared cochineal or red-currant juice.
- some blanc mange. Divide the jclly
Sinto two equal portions, and color ont
,with a very little prepared cochineal
leaving the other as it is of a pale
'aalble color. Wet a mold with coli
r- water, and pour in a litfle of the at
I- -er. Set the miold in ti:e ice, thai
rthe jelly may harden quickly, and
r so soon as it is firm, pour in carefully
- somte of the red. Set back upon th
ice to get ready for the amber, add
r. ing the two colors in this order unti
.you are ready for the base, whict
should be wider than the othem
e stripes, and. consist of the whit<
r blanc-mange,: Keep both jelly aiu
blanc-mangc near the fire until yot
have filled the mol-d-of course, thal
k uintended for the latest layers. Lel
all get very firm befoi'c you turn ii
', ourt,
Speech
OF
HIO N. G IZO. A. SHERIDA.
BEFORE TIHE
HQUSE OF REPRESENTATIVE
T n E two finest efforts, says t i
New Orleans Bulletin, which have r
cently been made in Congress are ti
speech of Senator Norwood, of Geo
gin, on the Civil Rights Bill, and th
of General George A. Shcridan, wl
was elected, by a majority of ov
10,000 votes, Congressman at Lar1
for Louisiana, but who was denib
his seat because it would have loc
cally resulted in ousting Mr. Kelloi
from his usurped position as Gover
or of Louisiana.
We deeply regret our inability
give Sheridan's graceful and maste
ly effort in full,' but must contel
ourselves by making such extrac
as will be most interesting to tl
general reader. Without the silver
a ringing tones of the orator's voic
t and his impassioned manner of d
) livery, the reader will of course mi
much of the beauty of an addre
s which would have done creditto Co
t, gross in its palmy days, when men
it brains and honor filled the sea
a- now occupied by mediocre and bigc
it ed demagogues.
o Mr. Kellogg, as nominee for Go
d ernor, had no record as a Republici
Id in the State. He had come to NE
,n Orleans as the appointee of Mr. Li
e coln as collector of customs. Scar(
of ly had the body of the great Pire
dent felt the chill of death befo
this man became the firm friend al
ly supporter of Andrew Johnson. I
to was a member of the Convention ca
ed at Philadelphia in the inters
of Mr. Johnson. He never return
in to his Republicanism until 18(
ot when the State went Republican.
. was well known that during his a
ministration of the Custom Hou
under Johnson, no soldier of t
Union could find a place within t
walls of the granite building. I
black man was found on the rol
3 save here and there, perhaps, one
cc whom was given the most menial el
s, ployment.
or It was known, too, that Mr. K
., logg had filled the Custom Hou
m with men elected to the first Legisi
ture of Louisiana, who had pledg
2k themselves to vote for him for Unit
ut States Senator in consideration.
ld the favor extended to them. The
P, of us who knew Mr. Kellogg w
found little in his record to give
it either faith in his political sagaci
y or confidence in his integrity. V
i1- had no faith in his veracity. Jud
Id ed by their record Ananias and i
l consort were shining examples
to truth compared to Kellogg. It is
trecord, I believe, that they falsifi
only upon one occasion. It is
id where upon record in Louisiana th
Mr. Kellogg ever told the truth,.
a fact he had no record before the p
in ple, whose suffrages he claimed, I
in veracity or fair dealing., He was li
il Sir Agrippa, "for profound and sol
of lying much renowned."
Id Again, there was no vital issue
stake. There was nothing to dri
II, out the full force and strength of t
r Republican party, consisting as
u did, nineteen-twentieths of it,
Sblack men. The old cry that if th
at did not vote the Republican ticl
or they would be re-enslaved had i,
Sits power. They knew full well tI
e the grand question of their liber
a had long ago been taken out from t
y jurisdiction of courts, where lawy<
plead and interplead out from t
HIalls of Congress, where statesm
e; ponder and debate, and argued ir
ly court where God was judge and S.
IC ging armies were the advocates.
They knew that forth from the t
id bunalof Omnipotence the decree I
t- gone that ini this broad land all m
at were free and equal, and they kn
d, that decree could not be reverse
y that it was fixed and firm as are t
d- hiill and mountains of the earth up
til their everlasting pillars.
er Taxation when the Republic
d party took control in Louisiana w
,u thirty-seven anda half cents on $11
at In 1872 it had risen to $2 15. T
et Legislature had granted giant monu
it olies. Day by day they had impos
new l urdelltlns upon commerce un
searcely .a vessel folded its sails i
the harbor of New Orleans, and de
olation, reigned stipretpe where of ol
N the busy hum and throb of commer
wire heard. Do you wonder that ti
people of that State groaned undi
these burdens? Do you wonder th
they combined for the overthrow +
a gove'nment that had brought upc
e them such disasters as these? I as
e- you, men of New England, I ask yo'
he men of the Middle States, and ye
r- men of the giant West, how lot
at would such a condition of things I
ho tolerated in the States from whic
rer you come? Would not the peep
rise in their might and grandeur ar
ge sweep it from existence sO Cbmplet
ed ly that its name would never be heaL
i- of again (or if heard of, only spokE
gg of with scorn and contempt) a pari
n- that should bring such misfortux
upon the people of your section 4
to the country?
er- * * *
nt Pinchback presents himself befo
ts this House with acertificate. Ace
ie tificate signed by whom? Signed t
himself as Acting Governor of Lo
y' isiana. How came he acting Go
e, ernor of Louisiana? By virtue of ti
e- impeachment of Governor Warmot
is. Who impeached Governor Warmotl
%5s The Legislature of Louisiana? N
)u- sir; but a Legislature created by tl
of injunction of a Federal court orga
its ized in accordance with the terms
ot- that injunction, in a building fille
with United States soldiers, with
whose portals no man. was permitti
to enter unless his. name was -foul
)V- in that injunction, or he was t
an well-known partisan and supporter
ew the usurpation. The Legislate
in- that impeached Governor Warmo
ce- and gave Pinchback power to sil
Si- himself as "Acting Governor of Lo
are isiana," derived none of its pow4
Ld none of its authority, from the pt
He ple of Louisiana. It sprang, fu
11- armed,, with all its deadly power I
est wrong, from the corrupt brain of
led United States Judge, who, fresh fro
68, his haunts of infamy and..shan:
It reeking with the stench and fumes
ad- midnight debauchery, with the ki:
us es of harlots yet warm on his li
he and the music of their wanton son
the lingering in his ears, sheltering hi!
No self behind the robes of his high -
1L, fice, dared, in violation of an: expre
to provision of the very law. und
im- which he claimed jurisdiction, to.
sue a decree creating a Legislatu
:el- for the people of Loutisiana; and ,i
yse yoking the unwilling bayonets of tl
ila- United States to save :it from the I
red ry. of an outraged and insult,
ted people.
of This, sir, was the Legislate
Dse which gave my competitor the rig
rell. and power to sign himself "Actit
us Governor of Louisiana," and certi
ity to his electIon to this body.
Ig Away with the cry that Loutsia:
his or the South is disloyal; it is the c
o of men who can only live by keepil
on it before the people. It is not fro
ied the hearts of men who fought reb,
no lion down that this cry comes, n
t from the men who at Gettysburg,
Sthe Wilderness, upon the hills
o- Vicksburg, the mountains of Ge
or gia, and the slopes of Mission [email protected]
rolled in resistless columns again
id the armies of the South, does th
cry of treason come. No demai
that punishment shall be meted o
at to the South comes from them.
their hearts no hate is found; bra
themselves, they yield willing tribo
to the valor of their old-time for
o Mourning for their dead, they respe
ey the South because they, too, mon
et the loss of gallant sons. Sir, this
not the spirit that animates the pe
at ple of this great North.
rty This spirit of hate that these m,
he breathe finds no resting-place amoi
rs the people of New England or tl
people of the Nortwest. This spil
en of hate and vengeance is not the si
a rit which aninated the brave m
r- and fair women of this great cit
who but a day ago,. on yonder sac,
Sheights of Arlington, lisd their tri
Sutes of respect and love to. valor, n
en asked whether the grave tW offt
ew ings beautified held witiltts i
; arms one who wore the Federal bI
he or one who died in gray. It is r
Sthe spirit of hate and vengeance th
pervades in this country; but it is
spirit of love and devotion and go0
an will and.goodwishes to the' sufferi
and struggling people of the Sout
o00
Thank God, only here and there
this broad land we find men who I
ed selfish ends and sordid purposes so
til to mislead the people of the North
in to the hopes and aspirations of 't
p~ eople, of the South. They are. m
pl1 who tforget that in presence of t
ce dead the eye of anger should lose !
he baleful fire, and fill with the arm a
er holy light of kindness. They s
at the men who forget that vengean
of should doff its casque of steel, to
on off its shoes of mnail, and tread wi
sk reverent footsteps and uncover
u, head beside the graves where bra
on men sleep. They are the men w
og forget that while it is possible
be crush the armies and bury the b"
ch ners of a people, it is not possible
)le entomb their memories. Memoi
nd sir, is a monarch who holds unbot
te" ded sway in enchanted, realms, a
rd when he waves his mighty war
en bolts and bars and all the contrive
ty ces of human ingenuity to stay I
ne progress are of no avail, At his 1
of hest, all that is grand or beautiful,
worth recalling in the history of
* people, marching with noiseless fo
re steps to music unheard of, mor
ar- ears, sweeps by his throne in gra
by procession,
u- * * * *
,v- Let it not be written, let it tiot
he down in history, that we strs
th. chains from the limnbs of four n
h? lions of black people only to bi
o. them upon the limbs of eight n
he lions of white people. I believe tl
Ln- the black race of this country shol
of have every right that we possess
ed But I do not believe they.should h:
in any more. Not for them, as I
ed been the case in Louisiana, shol
nd armies be invoked to destroy 1
;he sactity of the ballot and to silei
of the voice of the people. Not uin
ire the pretense that it is for their 4
rth vation should eight millions of ý
bg ple, in whose hearts to-day thr<
)n- the same blood that throbs in yo
er, and mine, he madeto pass under
eo- yoke aiid be smitten with thong
ill- all the law gives for their equal
for But their supremacy, if suprein
Sa they achieve, should be the resull
om their own efforts, not enforced'
ne, Federal bayonets. Armies if n
of be to sustain them in their rigl
ss- but no srhns to sanctify their wrol
ips and give them force of law.
ags *
m- For myself I ask nothing. Ispi
of. for Louisiana. I claim for her
Bes justice which is her birth-rig
ler Clothed in the garments of v
is- bending her queenly head in sorr
ire suffering such op iressiori as ne
i.before felhtb the lot of any State
,he the" Union; she yet maintains
fn faith in the Federal compact, her
ed lief in the justice of this great
fion. Weak and tottering as she
ite her hand would be among the firsi
sht seize the sword if war's alarm w
ng sounded in: the laind; if dan;
ify threaten, side by side, shoulder
shoulder, the men who live bene
* her tropic skies would march w
na the men of the North in defense
this nation's honor.
ug I ask such judgment at your hai
mas I am entitled toexpect, I ask
i- Rephblican votes because I have be
iota Republican. - I ask no Democra
in votes because I have affiliated w
of the Democracy. I simply ask 3
shall do the' people justice in 1
person of the representative tl
st have sent here.
CUnrous CONUNDRUM,-A, Biis
newspaper, as if aggravating con
ut drums enough had not been star
already, wants to know "Why~t
ve thirds ofthe hotel clerks are bali
te If this be the fact, of which we
es. notaure, it may be because the i
t ces of nature have been diver
- from the scalp to the cultivation
Ssupernatural cheek, Possibly th
o gentlemen sell their hair to. ra
money for the purchase of shirt-pi
Len Or the consignment of innocent a
wg ay-worn travelers to the sixtee
he story may subsequently breed
morse (though we doubt its) and
Smorse may, in turn, produce the 1
enliard-ball baldness. But it isn'
ty, problem with which,' in this weath
'ed
we care to grapple.
ib-..
or PooR FELLOW !- Wife of his bos
er- (directly he 'came home at nigh
cy "Charley, I've just got a letter fr
lue mother, You know .she was. A
lot only, ast week :(yes, you can see
iat the expression of his. face that
a hasn't forgotten that), and she i
o lost all her property by the fail
ng of the Splu]-p--a n d-and now
thb s'pose, Charley,,she'll have to co
in and stay with as all the time."
"Tr ThTT's So!--Bleised are the
k phan children, for they have no
as thers to spank them,
ihe W- , t f4 R**Ward'
ten -
he HOW HE AWANTED TO SPECULATE ON
itS THEGRAKT PARISH AFFAIR,-AGERS
ld SPOILS n 1S GAME.
are -
ice From the beginning of the Grant
Lke Parish case down to t he present
ith time, no one has made himself more
:ed odious and despicable than William
e Ward, a blood-thirsty niegro, who in
'ho his zeal to secure the conviction of
to the, prisoners on trial left nothing
undone which ingenuity could sug
to gest o r. l o w cunning invent. He
worked incessantly during the pen
a dency of the case, and what with in,
nd structing witnesses and manufactu
ud, ring evidence, he succeeded in influ.,
an- encing the verdict more or less. We
his have a word or two to say about this
be- scamp.
or During the session of the last Leg
ar islature, when the Radical heart was
yot- yet full of raticor at the Colfax af
tal fair, Ward, with ain eye to businless,
mad and in keeping with his past charac,
ter, determined to profit by the event.
* He thought thastthe negrbes of the
go Legislattuie would readily pass any
aick ppropriation for the relief of those
nil- self-exiled patriots from Grant Par
ind ish, and accordingly, after cogitating
nil- some time, he hit: upon tee planta
hat tion dodge, which loyal citizens so.
uld frequently carried out just. qter the
war. He therefore set aboutt aking
ae up his:inventory of losses.poccasioned
has by the mob,. as he calls it,.to iris
'ad herds of sttock, warehouses of cotton,,.
the household furniture, etc., ,qn made a
ace pretty good job of it.:
Lder This inventor.y he put in the form
ele- of an affidavit and got .severpl vera
eo, cious (?) witnesses ,:teo attesti it s
obs truth, and thus ,armed, hte presented
urs himself as the injured cherub at the
the door of the Hglqe. The followi4gts
his tale of woeain his own choice style
ity. of spelling:
STATE OF LOUtSIANA,
acy Parish of Orleans.
t of Personally came and appeared before
by me W. L. Evans, 24 Justice of the
dPeace in and for the Parish of Orleans-
Leed William Ward being duley swlit ace.
hts, cording to law doth depose, and.say,
that he is a, sitian of the Parish of
ngs Grant and thxat on the 8th day of April
A D 1873 an armed mob invaded thie
Town ofColtfax and that the said mgb
did take & carry away the followlag
eak property belongingto the said William
Ward 'To-witt' .
(3) Three mules t2) ''wo hiorses' and
ght. the said ;William Walrd was growing
roe, C9gp 0in said Parish he. cultivated (20)
acres in cotton (10) Ten Acres ,in corn
'OW, all 'of which was a loss to him also plani
'mer tation supplies to the' amount r ($900)
;nine hundred dollars,also Household
in furniture also (1) one Wheeler'and Wii&
her son Sewing machine .aamounting to
($400) Four hundred dollars also (18)
be- Eighteen Bales Cotton at'15° per pound
na ($14560; one Thousand Four Hundl'ed
and Fifty dollars Horses,, nd mules
is, ($50) Seven Hundiied ah'd Ffty dollars
t to amounting In the aggregate to thesaum
ore of ($3600) Three thousand Six:hundred
Dollars.
ger (Signed) WILuAM WARD
to worn to and subscribed to before me
this 26th day of January 1874 W. L.
ath Evans Second Justice Peace.
rith We the undersigned witnesses testify
under oath that the foregoing statemenmt
of of William Ward is true andecorrect in
each pa,'tieular.
d (Signed) E. H. FLowmas ,
W. S.. Chtioux,
:no SACK THOMAS,
e VALcoUa JoaCsoO
his
stic Taox X Jonn so.
rith rimark.
Sworh anld subscribed before me this
you 26th day of January 1874.
the W. L. EVANS,
Second Justice Peace Parish Orleans La,
hey This ax didn't grind worth a cent,
and then he with. renewed ardor set
ton about it in another way. ,He offered
n-to slhare with certain parties the
4bed amount of his appropriation, if he
wo as successful, but probably he did
, not come down heavy enough for the
Smembers, for dissatisfied with his
for- past success, he thought he would
ted try Vigers, Bill Vigers, clerk, whom
ofwe believe the Bulletin has made the
ee public acquainted with before, One
ise day, with pangs'of patriotic anguish
ins, racking his heart, and with tears of
and humility standing in his eyes, he
nth. wrote. the followihg billet doux to
re- Vigers, hoping to push on hJi little
re- game:
bil- I want this amonf to carry it thi'tf ht
totail 30 hundred Dol, I will leye 15
t Shundred."
hier, is persuader was writtehi dii a.
tori ski of note paper :and sent to
Vigers. Wdird's lacky star Was not
in the ascendant that day fibr Vigere
It): could'nt see it, and poor Ward :*a
om the tegislature' adjourn without get
re ing his $3600,
by In, the realms ofi is vivid, Xx
henation he pictures, wanderingF'n e
SloLt stars, 18 bales of co;ton, 3 iue
ure 2 horses and 20 acres. of 9 and
S sighs that "dis nigger isn'tapp
me any more."-[1N. O. Bulletin "
Bia H Asitncr cpEFs, - ThoEOld
or- fashioned handkerchiefs, big enougI
me- for any ~sort of nose, are coming intl
fashion anain,

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