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The Bedford gazette. [volume] (Bedford, Pa.) 1805-current, March 24, 1870, Image 1

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BY MEYERS & MENGEL.
dPttbtiatiottS.
JB7O. rFAM,v ' v 1870.
NEWSPAPER FOR EVERYBODY
"THE PATRIOT,"
A Daily anl Weekly Newspaper
GREAT INDUCEMENTS TO CLUBS,
o.lly D niiocratie Paper at the Capital.
THE WEEKLY 1 ATKIOT
s an eight page sheet, and contains ftrty-eight
Columns of reading matter, luits columns can
ue found tales sketches, cm resnoudence.
spuhes. agricultural facts and experience*,
rjteiuts iu -lotu-Stic economy, science and art.
1, oovery, travel, iu aidant*, anecdote?, historical
stficeues, state uess items, local occurrences.
fro ' t md do en j'tc news, noted evci ts, tele
grams from all parts of the world, commercial re
p >rts, ?ro'K an i general market quotations and a
gr iit v iriety ••f :jrreui mtacellauy, be-iuesedit
oritl 1.1 1 JO umunicated discuaaiona ot and crtti-
Cisus the p.st political eveutsof the limes
A 1 IJ I to enssd varied subjects will be mil and
fr J t i est >r. of congressional and legislative pro
"'''""WlH OF THE WEEKLY:
)is s py, •te ye ir, casb in advance $2 00
t ■ j c pv, six months, " " f V°
F>ir c >p,es, >ue year, '* " * - ,u
t' 11 J pte*. one year, " f* !' u
T J tty copies, one year," " 25 On
T uriy copies, one year, " " 00
Fifty J ipiei.one year, " " 8' Oo
On ban Ire,l copies, " " 135 00
.Fit,i CJC fillowiug premiums to persous getting
up ilars. Age its -on ling us cla'os will be paio the
fill > ring pr miuins in money :
To i iy person sending us a
Oluo o four for $7 50 cash $1 00
*• ten for $lB OU cash 200
" twenty for 35 00 cash 401
■' thirty torssl OOcash 6On
" fifty f.irsil 00 cash 10 Oil
11 one baa ice J torsl 35 00 ca5h...... 25 00
The cish to ucompauy every order. Agents
miyrettin unountof their premiums.
Y* i i i • man lev >te your leisure time to gett;ng
up slabs for theI'ATRIOT There is not a vil
la.} i or cowuihtpin which, with a little exertion.
■ i Hub any not be raised Here is an excellent
opp irtnoity to circulate a goo I weekly paper ?nd
in tke mo te/ by the operation. No such offers
ut -.C) o'er m i le before by the publisbeis of any
uewsp iper Send your order? as soon as possible.
THE \I MINING PATRIOT
is a firstl ISS daily newspaper, containing full
as<oci ited press repot ts special Wa.-bingtuu dis
p itches from our own correspondent "Delta,
the in >st niinpleteaud accurate market reports,
full accounts of the proceedings ofCongress and
L tgi data re, spicy ediiojial*. etc.. e-c.
TERMS OF THE DAILY :
■One copy, one year, by mail *' ®"
F vo copies, one year, by mail 32 (Ml
Ten copies.one year, by mail 6 y
L irger club? at the Ihbi named rates. P per?
tn ay b ) separately addressed. but must be taken
in one p wkage. The money must accompany the
order to insure attention. Address
B F. MEYERS 4 Co.,
dec2tf Harrisburg, Pa._
\TOW IS THE TIME TO SCB
JJ>( SOI E FOR THE
NEW YORK WEEKLY.
The People s Fayorite Journal.
The Most interesting Stories
Are always to be found in the
NEW YORK WEEKLY.
At present there are
SIX GREAT STORIES
running through ilseolumns; and at least
ONE STORY IS BEGUN EVERY MONTH.
New Subscribers are thus sure of having the
commencement of a new oouti uued story, no mat
ter when they subscribe for the
NEW YORK WEEKLY.
Etch number of the NEW YORK W EEKL\
contains Several Beautiful Illustrations, Double
the Autouutof Reeling Matter ot any paper oi
its class end the sketches. Short Stories, Poems,
etc., are'by the ablest writers of America and
Karope. The
NEW YORK WEEKLY
•d >es not confine its usefulness to amusement, but
p * isront quantity ot r*Ny Instructive
JH itter, iu the luoai ooudeiised f rui 1 h*
X. V. WEEKLY DEEARTMEXTS
Uav e attained a high reputatiou from their brev
ity. ex -elltiuee, auu correct nets
The Plea* int Paragraphs are made up of the
coueeu i rtteti wit *nd uuuior of untuy iiiiiids.
rif Kioto'etg-3 Box liOGuliuaj I o uaelul in
form iti.ui on ell mituuer of subjects.
Pie Xetci Item* give in the words the
<u r uDtio.e loiugs all over the world.
fie. (jrossip vV nti Correspondent* contains
Answers to tU'{ttirers upon ail imaginable sub
lets.
AN bWKIVALED LITERARY PAPER
IS TUB
NEW YORK WEEKLY.
Kick ii.ue contains from EtG.'lT to TEN
STOKIB-? ai.d sKE rCHES. and 11 iLF A DOZ
EN i* EM4. •? AUDITION to the SIX "^RfA 1 -
S ROHLE? AND TLE VARIED DEPARTMENTS.
THt: TIiKAIF TO SUBSCRIBER*.
One Year—ingle ropy Three Dulls rs.
• ' , u r copies ($2 oo oactij.-Ten Dollars.
*' Eigbteopics Tweuty Dollars.
Those sen ling $2!) for a club ot Eight, all s nt
atouetiuic. will be entitled to a copy PKKK.
Gotters-up of clubs can afterward add aiugle
copies at $ 50 each
STREET 4 SMlTH,Proprietors,
nov2siu6. No. 55 Fulton Street. N Y.
'I-UIE WEEKLY SUN.
BALTIMORE
PESLI.-iIED EVERY o.tTI'RDAY MORNING,
11Y A. S. ABLE & (.0.,
FROM THE "'SPX IROX BCILDIXG,"
At tht S. E corn- rof Baltimur, and South sts.
Turns Cash. Advance:
For One Copy fur Six Month? or less f 1 00
For Oue Copy tor Oue Year 1 50
TIIE Wen&LY >L'S will rei cw its best efforts as
a first-cla.-e New? and Literary Journal Ev
ery improvement <>f modern j >urua'i*ui —by which
it is distinguished—will be maintained, and such
attention be given to tie several department? as
will in ure their continued interest.and whatever
iit'V be necessary to render tbeui more complete
will not be lost eight ot.
• Through no o her me lium can families and in
dividuals in the towns and village* and rural
districts of the country be at w ell supplied with
proper literature, and a full knowledge of the
>? trld'a whole news, from week to week.
MAKE VP CLUBS.
While the WEEKLY SUX is afforded at the low
rateotsl 50 per annum to single subscriber?, the
CU B rates are still lower, carrying tbe price j
do v n as low as one dollar per year whf re twenty
fiive copies or wore are takeu at one post office at
a time, vi* :
Club of Six Copies. One Year 5s 00
Club of Twelve Copies. Ore Year 15 00
Club os Fifteen C-pies.Oue Yesr 1 00
Club of Twentv Copies. One Year 22 00
Club of Twentv five Copies.One \ ear 25 till
Club of Thirty-five C >ptes. One Year 3o 0
Parties, then, should get up CLCBS in their
towns, villages and r eighborLoods, at.d thin se
cure the advantage of these very low rates. Any
postmaster or storekeeper in the e nnty may eas
ilv accomplish this among his acnuaintances, or
any active person, male or ft wale, do the same
The regular diffusion of the liphi and intelligence
which such a journal aflmds will be a moral aud
social advantage in any neigh boihood
To thoae parties getting upctubsl'or the Week
-1 y Sun. sent to one post i ffice, we will mail here
after to tbe address ot any one sending us
A Cut OF TWEOVE SUBSCRIBERS
An extra copy a' the Weekly Sun. gratis, forone
year ; for a
CLCB :>r TwEsrr SUBSCRIBERS
We will seud a copy of Tne Daily and Weekly
Sun for six months; for a
CLUB OF TWEXW-FIVE SI BSCRIBRRB
We will send a copy l the Daily Suu for one
year, and to the sender of a
CLUBOFTHIRTV RTVEOR MORE
We wilt wall both tbe L'aily and Weekly Sun for
one year.
GARDEN, FRUIT.
* HERB, TREE. SHRUB and EVERGREEN
SKBD.S with direction? for culture, prepaid by
mul The most complete and jit licioas assort
wnt in the country Ag*-nta wanted.
25 "forts of ether for $100; prepaid by mail.
Also Small Fruits, Plants, Bulbs, all the new
P itstaia. Ac., prepaid bv m? ; l 4 lbs. Eaiiv
itu.a Potat >. prepaid, for $1 00 Conover's
Co' oj,I Asoiragu* $3 prr 100; $25 per 1000,
preodl. ff ;w hr Cy fratrant cverblooniing Ja.
pin H ney?uekle. 50 etc. each, prepaid. True
C*;ic Cod Cranberry, for upland or lowland cul
ture, $1 00 p-r 100, prepaid, with directions.—
Prised Catalogue to any address, gratis; also
trade list. t*ed< on Commission.
B M. WATSON. Old Colony Nurserio? and
ftasl Warehouse, Plymouth. Man. Established
n 1*42 JanOmi,
TERMS OF PUBLICATION.
rH*BitDroHi>GAtTTKi publiahederery Thnrs
,ay morning by MEVBES 4 t $2.00 per
iinum, if paid strictly in advance , $2.50 il pud
ail months; $3.00 it not paio withinsix
months. Alt subscription accounts MUST be
etlted annually No pnper wilt be sent out o
he State nnleeu paid Tor IN ADVANCE, and all such
jltscriptions will invariably be discontinued ai
e expiration of tho time for which they are
aid.
AH ADVERTISEMENTS for a less term than
hree month* TEN CENTS per line for each In
ertion. Special notices one-balf additional All
isoluti-ns of Associations; communications of
mited or individual interest, and notices of mar
riages and deaths exceeding five liner, ten cents
per line. Editorial notices fifteen cents per line.
All legal Notices of every kind, and Orphans'
Court and Judicial Sales, are required by lam
be published in both papers published in this
dace.
All advertising due after first insertion.
A liberal discount is made to persons advertising
by the quarter, half y ear, or year, as follows :
3 months, fi months. 1 year.
•One square - - - $4 50 $ 6 Oii *JO 00
Two squares - - - 8 1)0 000 16 60
Three squares - - - 8 00 12 00 20 00
Quarter column • • 14 00 20 00 35 00
Half column - - - 18 00 25 00 45 00
One column - 30 00 45 00 80 00
♦One square to occupy one inch of space
JOB PRINTING, of every kind, done with
aeatness and dispatch. THE GAZETTE OEEICB has
just been refitted with a Power Press and new type,
and everything in the Printing line can be exocu
ted in the most artistic manner and at the lowest
rites —TERMS CASH
IjTAUIe tiers should be addressd to
MEYERS 4 MENGEL,
Publishers.
pisrelliiufouis.
jpilE INQUIRER
;BOOK STORE,
opposite the Mengel House,
BEDFORD,PA.
Tbe proprietor take* pleasure in offering to the
public the I'oliow ing articles belonging to the
Book Business, at CITY* RETAIL PRICES :
MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS.
NOVELS.
BIBLES, HYMN BOOKS, &C.:
Large Family Bibles,
Small Bibles,
Medium Bibles,
Lutheran Hymn Books,
Metbodist Hymn Boot.s,
Smith's Dictionary of the Bible,
History of tbe Books of the Bible,
Pilgrim's Progress, 4c., 4c., 4c.
Episcopal Prayer looks,
Presbyterian Hymn Books,
SCHOOL BOOKS.
TOY BOOKS.
STATIONERY,
Congress, Legal,
Record, Foolsci p.
Letter, Congress Letter,
Sermon, Commercial Note,
Ladies' Gilt, Ladies' Octavo,
Mourning, French Note,
Bath Post, Damask Laid Note,
Cream Laid Note, Envelopes, Ac.
WALL PAPER.
Several Hundred Different Figures, the Largest
lot ever brought to Bedford county, for
sale at prices CHEAPER THAN
EVER SOLD iu Bedford.
BLANK BOOKS.
Day Books, Ledgers,
A-'Count Books, Cash Books,
Pocket Ledgers, Time Books,
Tuck Memorandums, Pass Books,
Money Books, Pocket Books,
Blank Judgment Notes, drafts, receipts, Ac
INKs AN L INKtsTAN Lb.
Barometer Inkstands,
Gutta Peicba,
Cocoa, and
Morocco Spring Pocket Inkstands,
Gins- and Ordinary Stands for Schools,
Flat Glass Ink Wells and Back,
Arnold's Writing Fluids,
Hover's Inks.
Carmine Inks. Purple Inks,
Charlton's Inks,
Eokolon for pasting, Ac
PENS AND PENCILS.
Gillot's, Cohen's,
Hollowbush A Carey's, Payson.
Dunton. aou Seribner'e Pens,
Clark's Indellible, Faker's lablet,
Cohen's Eagie.
Olfice, Faber's
Guttknechl's. Carpenter's Pencils
PERIODICALS.
Atlantic Mon hly,
Harper's Magazine,
Madame Detuorest's Mirror of Fashions.
Eleetic Magazine,
Godev's Lady's Book,
Galaxy.
Lady's Friend,
Ladies' Repository,
Our Young Folks,
Sick Nax.
Yankee Notions,
Budget of Fun,
Jolly Joker,
Phuuny Phellnw,
Lippincott's Magazine,
Riverside Magazine,
Waverly Magazine,
Ballou's Magazine,
Gardner's Monthly.
Harper's Weekly,
rank Leslie'! Illustrated,
Chimney Corner,
New York Ledger,
New York Weekly,
Harper's Bazar,
Every Saturday,
Living Age,
Putnam sMonthly Magazine,
Arthur's Rome Magazine,
Oliver Gptic's Boys and Girl's Magazine Ac.
Constantly on hand to accomodate those who want
to purchase living reading maltter.
<>nly a part of the vast number of articles per
taining to the Book end Statio:ery business,
which we are prer ared to sell cheaper than the
cheapest, are abo/eenumerated. Give us a call
We buy and sell for C ASH, and by this arrange
ment wesrpect to sell as cheap m goods ol this
class are sold anywhere
I inglS7o.
rriHEBEDFOJUH BANK,
X BLOODY RUN, PENN'A.
Accounts Solicited from Bonks, Barkers and
others. Interests aliowed 011 time deposits. Col
lections in >de on ail accessible points A general
banking business transacted. Stockholdeis indi
vidually liable for deposits.
STOCKHOLDERS:
J M. BELL, G. W. GAKRETSON. j
\V. PGR BISON, D. P. GH IN.
JOHN tCOIT. H U. FISHER,
THMAS FIS HER, J. H GLAZtKR,
VV ltiißßF,
—of Firet National Bank of Huntingdon, Pa.
S. L RL'SSELL, Bedford. Pa.
S NYCUH. Kays Hill. Pa.
J. M 8.-tKNUOLLAU, Bloody Run, Pa.
J B WILLIAMS.
J. W BARN-DOLLAR, " •
J DuBOIS, " "
feblMit. J Bi'BOlS,Cashier.
OPRINO AND SIMMER IMPOUIAIIO \T
o i to . IN
RIBBONS, MILLI.SERY AND STRAW
GOODS.
ARMSTONU, CATOR, & CO ,
Importers and Jobbers of
Bonnet, Trimming and Velvet Ribbons, Bon
net Silks. Satins snd Velvets, Blonds, Netts;
Crapes. Ruches, Flowers, Feathers, Ornaments,
Straw Bonnets snd Ladies' Hats, Trimmed and
Uotrimmed, Shaker Hoods, Ac.
23T and43o Baltimore Street,
BALTIMORE MD.
Offer the largeet Stock to be found ia this
Country, and nneqnaied ia ohoiee vsrioty and
cheapness, comprising tho latest Parisiaa nov
elties.
Orders solioited, and prompt attention given.
ftbMm)*
BEDFORD, PA. THURSDAY MORNING, MARCH 24,1870.
I WHS cured of Deafness ami Catarrh
by a sin pie remedy, aad will send the receipt
tret. MRS. M. C LEGGETT, Hoboken. N. \
mar)ow4 ;
fJIJiK NEW ARTICLE OF FOOD.
For twenty five cents you can buy of your
Druggist or Grocer a package of Sea Moss
Fanue, mannfact uitd from purs Irish Moss or
Carrageen, which will make sixteen quarts of
Blanc Mange, and a like quantity of Pud
dings, Custards, Creams, Charlotte Russe, bfc.,
£(•. It is by far the cheapest, healthiest and
most delicious food in the world.
RAND SEA MO3S FARINE CO.,
53 Park Piacc, N. Y.
PLANTATION BITTER^
s. T.—lß6o—X.
Tht wonderful veget >bh restorative t the
sheet-anchor of the feeble- and debt 1/fated A*
a tome and cordial for the aged and languid y
it has no equal among s'omachics As a rem
edy for the nervous weakness to which women
an especially subject, it is superseding every
other stimulant, la all climates, tropical, tem
perate or frigid, it acts as o. specific in every
species of disorder wk eh and ermines the bodily
stre glh and breaks down the animal spirits.
For salt by all druggists mnrlOuiO.
IAA RM KILS, Their Sons ami others,
can make money rapidly, selling the NEW
li.LU-TKAI El> FARMERS' MANUAL, ed.ted
by Geo E WARING. Jr. Practical Farmer ar.d
Author, and late Ag'iculiural Engineer of N.
Y C> ntral Park. The best book for Farmers
ever issued—All need il belore planting. It is a
atuiid, ifbor saving, money making book -
Thousands ha ve bought it, and thousands more
want it 15th Edition ready Live Agents waul
ed Profits large A 11 HUBBARD, 400 Cites
npt St. Philadelphia. mar,lo4
rpllE GREAT MEDICAL DISCOV
ERY.
DR. WALKER S
; CALIFORNIA VINEGAR BITTERS.
Jlore than 500.000 persons bear testimony
to their Wonderful Curative Effects.
WHAT ARK THEY ? They ar% not a VILE
FANCY DRINK made <>f P""r Rum, Whiskey,
Pu,of spirits, and ret use Liquors, doctored, spic
ed and sweetened to please trie taste, called •■ 100- .
ios " "Appetizers." "Restorers " Ac., that lead
the tippler on to drunkenness and ruin but are a
true medicine utade from the native Roots and
her! sof California, fret from. nil Alcoholic itim
n! an Is The, are the GREAT RL.DOD PURI
FIER and LIFE GIVING PRINCIPLE, a per
fact Renovator aud luvtgorator of the System,
carrying off all poisonous matter, and restoring
the blood to a nealtby condition. No person can
take these Bitters according to directions, aud
remain In g jnwell.
slllO will bo given for an iaeurabie case, pro
vided ibe boues are not destr .yed by mineral p i-
Mins or other means, and Vital organs wasted be
yond the point of repair
For Inflammatory and Chronic Rheuml'tsm,
and Gout, l>y*p p* U- or Indigestion, Bilious,
htmilit.it, and Intermittent Fever*. Di.s
ruxt* of the Blood, Livers, Kidney, and Bl td
drr. these Bitters have been uv-t successful
ruch I'iseß.es are caused by Vtiiated Blood,
which is generally produced by derangement of
the Digestive Orgaus.
F"R FEMALE COMPLAINTS, whether in
Voutrg orold. msrried or single, at the dawn of
womanhood or the turn of life, these Tonic Bitters
have no tqual. Lw'-tv-nd for a circular
Tii KY ARE a GENTLE PUKGaTIVE AS
WELL AS A TONIC, possessing also, the pecuti
ar merit c~f *•" *"K as* powerful agent in relieving
Congestion, or to A rotation of the Liver, and all
ilie Visceral Organs ...
Clean.- the Vt.i"ted Blood whenever you find its
impurities bursting through the skin in Pimples.
Eruptions or Sores; cleanse it when you find
it obstructed and sluggish 111 the veius.
cleanse it when it ts foul, and your
leeltogs Will tell you when. Keep the blood
pure and the hea th of the system will follow
PIN, TAPE and other WORMS, lurking in the
system 01 s • many thousands, ere effectually de
stroyed and rt moved.
•n Bilious, Kemitient. and Intermittent Fevers,
these Bitters have no equal. For full directions
read carelully the circular around each bottle,
pritued in lour languages—English, German,
French and Spanish
J WALKER, Proprietor,
3d Commerce St.. N Y.
R H MCDONALD T co.,
Druggists, and General Agents Sin Fr.iueisc -
and Sasran ento, California, and 32 and 34 Com
merce St . N. Y
SOLD BY ALL DRUUOISTS A DEAL-
Elvn. marlom3.
i r|A HK MAGIC COMB will chanue
| any colored hair or beard to a permanent
I black or brown It contains potion. Anyone
can use it One sent by iua-1 fur sl. Address
MAGIC COMB CO , Springfield, Mass.
marlOinS.
rpn F. AMKIt IC A N FAMI LY
| J KNITTING MACHINE IS presented to the
public as the most Simple, Durable, and Com
pact and Cheap Knitting M ichine ever iuveuied.
PRICE ONLY 2.3 DOLLAR*.
This rnacl ine will run cither backward or for
ward wilb equal facility; makes the same itttsb
as by band, but far superior in every respect.
Will knit 20,000 Slit-lies in one minute,
and do perfeot work, leaving every knot on the
inside tf the work It will knit a pair of -took
ing-(any size) in less than half an hour It will
knii Close or Open, Plain or Ribbed work, wilh
any kind ot coarse or fine woolen yarn or cotton,
silk or linen It will knit stockings with double
beel and toe drawers, bo"ds, sacks, smoking
eajw. couifor'S. purses muffs, fringe, afghaus,
nomas, uudersleeves, milieus skating caps, lamp
wicks, mats, cord, undershirts. Shawls, jackets,
cradle blankets, leggings, suspenders, wristers,
Mdies, rippitt. tufted work, and iu lact an cudless
•riety ot articles in every day use, as well as
J*- ornament.
* H 5 i\J 10 DOLLARS PER DAY
' ' made by sny one with the American
Can be Machine, knitting stockings, Ac , while
Knitting . 'u,rs Can even make more knitting
• xpcrioperi. which always commands a ready
fancy work. cb readily knit from twelve to
sale. A peigon things per day, the pr. fit oo
fifteen pairs ol St. ,^ an f, )r ;v cents per pair
.. '' "*> T wwl at c- " b ~Tty
FAItMEI- Canst. woo |
fitly cents per pound; * s *
made into yarn at a sma. ' k ". lU '"ls
■ t into socks, two or three . </'"• im pound may
be lealized. On receipt of $. 4 forward a
ma.Tiine as ordi red .
V\ c wish to procure active AG T every
section ot the United Slates and Cauad.'es, to
whom the most liberal inducem<' ,
fend AdlresS AMERICAN KNI UING MA
CHINE COMI'ANY. Boston Mass., ( M.
Mo. Jb24w4
INFORMATION in the "I
Journal." How Teachers, Students, keiir
vJ Clergymen, Energetic Young Men a ™
I dies can make $75 to $l5O per mouth duri '"e J be
bpring and Summer A copy free. Aend naane
: and address to -People's Journal, Philadel, thta,
| Pa. feb24i
HI N KL K Y KNITTING M. V
CHINE —FOR FAMILY USE—simple,-
uncap, reliable, Knits every thing. Agents wan
ted. Circular and sample stocking Iree. Ad
dress JUNKLEY KNITIING MACHINE CO.,
Bath. Me. or I7d Biuadway N Y.. 1e1)24ui3
Li —s)a) IN 3 1 DAY 8 .
lO j Made by one Agent, selling Sil
ver's Patent Elastic Broom. Over 50.000 u,w in
n.a Kecon.mended ly Hon. Horace Greely and
AmeiicHD Agrieuliuriat. tine oouuty reserved
f..r each Agent. C. A CLEGU A CO, 3d Cort
land! St., N. Y. or 12fi Wushmgtun St. Chicago,
111. ftb24w4
FA KM ERS' M UTU A L FIR E IN
SURANCE COMPANY. OF YORK, PA.
Th* bttt and mart reliable Company in the
State.
i
IJT'AII information given by
JOS E NOBLE. Agent,
feb 17iu3 WaTKBStPB, 1 A.
SPIDLE <t- MINNICH,
PAINTERS. HANGERS, Ao.
Th abore firm are prepared -o do all kinds of
PLAIN and FANCY PAINTING,
GRAINING, and everything in that line, in town
and country. Paper banging promptly (.tended
to
Shop on the corner of Pitt and Richard street*
opposite Hartley A Mettger's Hariward store.
oetSSyrl.
geilfciil ©axfttf
MY lII'NBASW* ktcn\ WIFE.
My husband came tenderly by my
side.
"Are you going this evening,
love?"
"Of course I am
I looked down complacently at my
of pink crap", (lew-dropped over
with crystal, and the trails of pitrk a
z deas that caught up its folds here and
there. A diamond bracelet encircled
the one white arm, and a little cross
blazed fitfully on inv throat. 1 had
never looked better, and I felt a sort of
girlish pritle as my eyes met the "airy
retiecti .11 in the mirror.
"Come, Gerald, make haste ! Why,
you haven't begun to dress yet !"
W here were my wifely instincts that
I did not see the haggard, drawn look
in his features—the fevered light in
his eyes?"
"I can't go to-night, Madeline—l am
not well enough."
"You are never 'well enough to o
b ige me, Gerald. lam tired of being
put off with such excuses."
He made no answer, hut dropped his
head in his hands, 011 the table before
him.
"Oh, come, Gerald," I urged petu '
lantly ; 'it is so awkward for me to go |
alone always."
lie shook his head listlessly.
"1 thought, perhaps, you would be !
willing to remain at home with me,
Madeline."
"Men are so selfish," I said, plain- j
lively; "and lam all dressed. Claudia i
took a half hour for my hair. I dare j
say you are determined uot to go."
No answer again.
"Well, if you choose to be sullen, I
can't help it," 1 said lightly, as Hunt
ed and went out of the room, adjusting
my boquet holder, the tube-rose and
heliotrope; seemed to distil incense at
at every motion.
Was 1 heartless and cruel ? Had I
ceased to love my husband? From
the bottom of my heart 1 believed that
I loved him truly and tenderly as ev
er a wife did*, hut I had been so spoiled
and petted all my brief selfish life, that j
the belter instincts were, so to
eotomed alive.
1 went to the party and had my fill
of adulation and homage, as usual.
The hours seemed to glide away,
shod with roses, and winged with uiu- !
sic and perfume; and it was not until
wearied with danci ig, 1 sought a mo
mentary refuge in the hutf-lighted tea- j
r mill, that 1 heard words awakening
me, as it were from a dream.
"Gerald Glen !"
I could not well be inastaken in the 1
name—it was scarcely common-place i
enough for that. They were talking
—two or three business-like-looking j
gentlemen—in th bail,without; and 1
could catch, now and then, a fugitive !
word or phrase.
'Tine, enterprising young fellow !"
—"Great pity '."—"Totally ruined ; so
Bi'ss and McMorken says !"—"Help
lessness and extravagance of his wile!"
All these vague fragments I heard;
! and t htn sc me one .-aid:
"And what is he going to do now !"
"What can he do? Poor fellow ! 1
I am sorry ; but he s tould have calcula
ted his income and expenses better."
"Or bis wife should. Oh, these wo
men! they lie at the bottom of all
man's troubl !"
And they laughed. Oh, how could
they ? 1 had yet to learn how easy it
is in this world, to bear other poople's
troubles.
I ro-e hurriedly up, with my heart
! heating tunnilUiously beneath the pink
azaleas, and went hack to the lighted
saloon. Mr. Albany Moore was wai
ting t< claim my hand for tlie next
dance,—Are you ill, Mrs. Glen? How
pale?"
"I—l am not very well. I wish you
would have my carriage called, Mr.
Moore."
For now I thought that home was
the proper place for me.
Hurried by some unaccountable im
pulse, I sprang out the moment the
' carriage wheels touched the curbstone,
and rushed up to my husband's room.
Tae d >or was locked, hut I could see a
light shining faintly under the thres
hold, I knocked wildly and persistent
ly.
"Gerald, dear Gerald ! for Heaven's
sake, let me in."
Something fell on the marble hearth
stone wifhi n making inetaiie click,
and my husband opened the door a lil
tle. I had never seen hii" h"'k so pale
before or so rigid, yet so detenu P l ®* 4,
"Who are you?" he demanded wt.'-l
iy
"Why can you not leave me in
peace? "
"It's I, Gerald—you Madeline—your
own little wife."
And I caught from his hand the pis
tol he was trying to conceal in his
breast—its mate lay on the marble
hearth, under the mantel jnd I flung
it nut of the window.
"Gerald, would you have left me?"
"I would have escaped!" he cried,
gtl.'l half delirious, to all appearances;
. j Vbt-d isg race-m isery-her reproach
ed i > v>uil have escaped them all!"
His he ft weary like a child, on
my should I drew hil " to H
sofa, and sto otbered him witii a thou
sand murira'M words-* thousand
mute ca esses! forbad it uot been
all my fault ?
Ami through . die long weeks of fever
that followed, I nursed him with un
wavering care at \d devotion. I had
but one thought, Oh® desire—to re
deem myself in his estimation, to
prove to him that * Was something
rr,on and higher th the mere but
terfly of fashion I had hitherto shown
myself.
Well, the March winds had howled
t nemstdves away in th ir mountain
fastnesses; the brilliant April rain*
drops were dried on hough and spray ;
and the apple blossoms were tossing
their fragrant billows of pinky bloom
in the deep blue air of latter May.
Where are we now?
It is iu a picturesque little village
not fat from New York, furnished ve
ry like a magnificent baby-house.?—
Gerald -at in a cushioned easy-chair
in the garden, just where he could
glance through the open window at
me. working busily with my needle.
"What an industrious fairy it is!"
he said smiling sadly.
"Well, you see I like it. It's a great
deal better than those sonatas on the
piano."
"Who would have thought you
would make so notable a housekeep
er ?"
I laughed gleelully—l had a childs
delight in being praised.
"Are you not going to Miss Dealany's
croquet party?" he pursued.
"No, what do I bare for croquet par
ties? I'm going to finish yonr shirts
and you'll read aloud to me."
"Madeline, I want you to answer me
one question."
"What is it?"
"What have you done with your
diamonds ?"
"I sold thern long ago; they paid
several heavy hills, besides settling
half a year's rent here."
"But, Madeline, you were so proud of
your diamonds*"
"I was once ; now they would he the
bitterest reproach my eyes could meet.
O, Gerald, had I been less vain and
thoughtless and extravagant—"
I checked myself, and a robhin, sing
ing in the perfumed depths of the ap
ple blossoms took up the dropped cur
rent of the sound.
"That's right littlp red-breast," said
my husband, half-joking, "talk her
d wn ! She has forgotten that our past
is dead and gone, and that we have
turned over a new page in our Book
of Existence."
"Madeline, do you know how I feel
sometimes, when I sit and look at
you ?"
"No."
"Well, I feel like a widower who
has married again."
My heart gave a little superstitious
jump.
"Like a widower who has married
again, Gerald!"
"Yes; I can remember my first wife
—a brilliant, thoughtless child, with
out any idea beyond tlie gratification
of present whims—a spoiled plaything!
Well, that little Madeline has van
ished away into the past somewhere;
she has gone away to return no more,
and in her stead I behold my second
wife—a thoughtful tender woman,
whose watchful love surrounds me like
an atmosphere, whose character grows
more noble and develops itself into
new depths and beauty everyday."
I was kneeling by his side now,
with myeheek upon his arm, and my
eyes looking into his.
"And which do you l ive best, Ger
ald—the first or second wile?"
"I think the trials and vicisitudes
through which we have passed are wel
come, indeed. They have brought me
as their harvest of fruits, the priceless
treasure of my second wife "
That was what Gerald answered me
—the sweetest words that ever fell up
on my ear.
I
I WOKIiED AS EARXF.D IT.
A ft*\v wwks ago, a gentleman living
in an Eastern town was called out of
iiis l>ed one morning by several vigor
ous raps upon his front-door. Hastily j
dressing himself, he responded to
the call, and found standing upon the
steps and uncouth, roughly-clad boy,
with an axe on his shoulder, who, has
tily thrusting his hand into his panta
loons pocket, drew out a small roll,
and handing it to Judge H , said :
"There's seventy-five dollars, which
I want you to put in the saving 's-hank
and hastily turned on his heel and
started away.
The Judge, slightly disconcerted at
the curious proceeding, scarcely knew
what to say, till at length, recovering
his wits, cried out after the boy:
"Stop ! come back here. How did
you come by this money?"
"I worked, ami earned it, sir. My
time was out last night, and I got my
money. I've got a job chopping
which I began on this morning, and I
thought I'd leave the money with you
as I went to work, and then it wouldn't
take up my time this evening when I
want to study."
"What is your name, my boy?"
asked the Judge.
"I wrote it on the paper that I wrap
•HMJ the money up in." shouted the lit
tle wo ~,' ^ he J )lls sedon to his
That boy's note for thousand dol
lars due ten years hence w7 >u ' 1 '
good as gold. If he has his health,
will be worth double that then. I
He is beginning it the right way.— j
T ie very day his time was cut for the
summer, he entered upon another jot,
ami immediately placed the money he
had worked for where that wotld work
for him ; and with an economy of time
which is more to he praised than his
wise forethought with regard to mon
ey, he could not endure to have a mo
ment devoted to any thing but his
books when the long evenings came.
Five years from to day, wi.h a good
education, with good habits, with a
few hundred dollars, which he has
earned by work, his chances for place
in the business and political world will
be far greater than those ot the spend
thrift boy, who, born with fortune, be
gins without knowing the worth of
money, and instead of going up, goes
down. —Hearth unci Home.
If you call to see a poor family do
not give them a prayer half an-hour
long, but send them a barrel of flour.
It will go further and do them more
good.
ritOl'ltl.KM OF A COlitlttED CITIZEN.
| From the Pater* JD Guardian |
Near Paterson there lives a colored
person named James Stewart, whom
the community by common consent,
have dubbed Commodore Stewart.—
He is a talented but eccentric in
dividual, and has a weakness
for chickens. On one occasion,
being found near a poultry yard
under suspicious circumstances, he was
interrogated rather stiarply by the
owner cf the premises, as follows ;
"Well, Jim, what are you doing
here?"
"Oh, nuffin, nuffiin; jess walking
round."
"What do you want with my chick
ens ?"
"Nuffin at all. I was only iookin'
at 'em, dey look so nice."
This answer was but conciliatory and
conclusive, and would have fieen satis
factory had it not Keen for Jim's hat.
This was a rather worn soft felt, a
good deal too large for its wearer's
head, and it seemed to have a motion
• ttirely unusual in hats, and manifest
ly due to some remarkable cause. It
seemed to contract and expand and
move of itself, and clearly without
Jim's volition. So the next inquiry
was:
"Well is the matter with your
hat?"
"My hat? Dat's an old hat. I'se
fond of dat hat."
"What, take it off and lets look at
it."
"Take (lis hat off? No, sah, I'd
ketch cold in my head, sartain. I al
ways keep my hat 011 when I'm out
o' doors."
And with that Jim was about beat
ing a hasty retreat, when, at his first
step, a low "kluk, kluk, kluk," was
heard coming only too clearly from
the region nf his head-gear. This WHS
fatal, and Jim was stopped and forced
to remove his hat, when a plump, half
grown chicken jumped out and ran
hastily away. The air'with which the
culprit gazed after it was a study for a
painter; it expressed to perfection
wonder and perplexity blended, but
not a trace of guilt. Slowly he spoke,
as though explaining the matter to
himself, and accounting for so remark
able an incident:
"Well, if dat ain't de funniest ting I
ebla-r did see. Why, dat ar chicken
mi st up de leg o' my pan
taloons."
PROVERBS OF A BACHELOR.—A rich i
man is never ugly in the eyes of a
giii.
A beautiful woman smiling bespeaks
a purse weeping.
Every uian would rather be hand
some than good.
A house full of daughters is a celler
cf sour beer.
A man of straw is worth a woman
of gold.
Alas father! another daughter is
borh unto you, (is a Spanish exclama
tion of condolence.)
A rich wife is a source of a quarrel.
It is an ill house when the hen is a
talking bird.
lie who marries ill is very long in
becoming widow ed.
A rich widow weeps with one eye
and laughs with the other.
Telegraph operators should be more
careful. A traveler sent a message to
have'horse' meet him at the depot,
but the stupid fellow wrote it 'hearse,'
and consequently, he was hospitably
welcomed on his arrival by a skeleton
wagon.
Eight kinds of kisses are mentioned
in the Scriptures : the kisses of saluta
tion, valediction, reconciliation, sub
jection, approbation, adoration, treach
ery ami affection. We have a decided
preference for the last kind.
The broken heart of a London cab
man's daughter, who sued a lover for
"breach of promise," was healed by a
twenty-shilling award of damages.
This was doc-cheap.
Garibaldi is writing a novel
•'of the blood and thunder" order, and
kills somebody on every other page of
it. This must he very good reading
for a nervous family.
A Canadian reporter announcing the
sudden death of a lady says: "Her
moments were brief after the King of
Terrors appeared." So we should
have supposed.
Bonner is donating cheap church
l>ells to Western congregations.—
Whenever they are rung, the chimes
lintinnabulate "S ibscribe for 'he New
York Ledy.r."
The English blondes certainly gave
one chaste exhibition in Chicago, and
that was when they were chased out ol
town by an officer armed with a war
rant. "
Almost every alternate paper we
take up claims for itself, the "largest
circulation in the United Statos."-
There must be a lie lying around oose
somewhere.
John Onion is the suggestive name
of an editor. When he peels himself
and gets dow n heartily to his work, he
must bring water to the eyes of his
readers.
A parson was twitted with taking
too long a time over his white tie
while dressing. "It is my duty." he
ans.vered, "to attend most carefully to
my fold."
A lover wrote thus to his sweetheart:
"Delectable darling, you are so dulcet
that honey would blush in your pres
ence, and trecie stand appalled."
President Grant is anxious to h§ve
au early adjournment of Congress, in
order that he may spend next June "on
the Beach at Long Brauch."
VOL. 65.—WHOLE N0.3,360.
IIOCNE AMI FARM.
Fish and Muck Compost.—To [ire
pare fish enl muck compost, commence
with threeshovels of swamp muck,
and spread it on the ground in a circle,
if for a email heap of a few barrels of
fish pomace, or in a long heap for a
large quantity, then beat the fish fine
and scatter one shovelful over the
muck, and so continue alternately till
all is mixed leaving the heap cone
shaped. In a':out a week the heap
will begin to heat, and should be turn
ed and mixed, and commencing
at one side and making all the fine
with the back of the shovel. In a
week or ten days more, it should be
turned again. In three weeks it will
be fine and fit for use. It may oe kept
until wanted to lie used, hut will re
quire further turning if it continues to
heat. The muck should be damp when
mixed, or it will not heat sufficiently.
Peruvian guano and muck, or earth,
should be mixed in the pro|ortion of
six to one of guano. It does not heat,
but requires the same turning and
mixing as fish and muck. A handful
ofeither in the hill is about the quan
tity generally used, but of the fish
compost, more is required than of the
guano—as much as can be held in the
hand with the palm uppermost and
the fingers spread. If thrown inlo a
hole in a heap, it should he spread be
f ire being covered to avoid the danger
of destroying the seed, which never
should be planted directly upon it. —
American Agriculturist.
The Culture of the Tomato.—The seed
f>r an early crop of tomatoes may be
8 iwii about the middle of February
or the first of March. Great care
should be taken in saving seed from
the fruit which ripms earliest any sea
son. For family use the plants may
be started in a little box in a warm
riom, and for field culture in a hot
b>d or green-house. Do not be in too
great haste, in either case, to germin
ate the seed; but once started see that
the plants get no check from want of
air. When the plants are two or three
inches high they should be trans
planted into small pots, and fier
w irds into larger ones. They
s muld be transplanted at least twice
before being put into open ground,
and then not until ail appearance uf
frost is gone. Each time before trans
planting the plants should be well wa
tered, so that a ball of eartli may ad
here to and be removed with each
plant. In the open ground they
should not be less than four feet apart.
The soil should be kept friable, ami by
hoeing early and often prevent the
weeds from obtaining possession of the
soil. After the fruit has grown to any
size it is advisanle to prune, and in
that case do not be afraid to cut out all
suckers and non-bearing branches, and
to shorten those that wander. The
fruit may he kept clean and prevented
from premature decay by spreading
brush, salt, bay, or other such materi
al under the vines, or by training,—
None of these are, however, requisite
where the soil is light and dry, but it
i- true that when trained, the flavor of
the fruit thus grown is superior to th. t
ripened on the ground. For a late crop
theseedmay besownin theopen ground
in spring. When planted in tiiis plate
they will bear till the frost comes, and
1 inger if protected. Here are some
points which should be heeded in the
cultivation of this fruit:
1 Plants should be grown in warm,
light, rich soil, from the seeds of the
earliest ripened fruit of knowu good
quality.
2. They should be grown early.
3. During no time of their growth
should they suffer for want of warmth,
sunshine, fresh air, and a soil in prop*
j er mechanical and chemical condition
| for their healthy growth.
Taste in Dress.— A fashion writer in
I the Cincinnati Gazette , in her endeav
or to create better taste in dressing,
says:
I know a little creature, fair as the
spring morning, sweet and bornie, and
blithe, with golden tresses and great
blue eyes, with laughter in them that
can in a trice fill with enchanting tears
—a small woman of moods and fanta
sies, of all sweet imaginations and
many piquancies.
This little thing always dresses in
character. Sometimes sae wears an
(Jndine costume, a miracle of green
satin and white tulle, with strings of
pearls, and tiny pink shells twisted in
her lovely hair, and winding round
her pretty throat.
Sometimes she plays snowdrop In
her opera suit of thick white silk,
whose overskirt and quilted ja< ket
are trimmed with airy bands of swan's
down.
Sometimes she nestles among her
fl iwers like a dear little forget-me-not,
in her blue silk robe, whose dainty
scolloped ruffles cluster about her in
tend j r calyxy fashion.
And withal she is a bright, intelli
gent render of books and people, and
does not , by any means, spent! her life
in "thinking up" her cost union,
They are simply expressions of her
self, blossomings of iter own c '.arming
individuality, and she can no uiort
help devising and wearing her dainty
clothes than she can help breathing.
Taste is inherent, but it can also be
acquired. A little thought, a little
study of one's characteristics and
graces of expression, is ail that is nec
essary.
Notning is more absurd than the spec
tacle of a plump matron, conveying
herself about under the airy, fairy
beauties of the paniors and flounces of
romantic eighteen.
Equally ridiculous is the dressing of
eighteen In the heavy gray silk
that belongs, by right, to nuvtter-of
fact forty.
They disgust me.
Tasteful dress is a great sculptor.
Let us have more taste, and less-hap
hazard bedevilment of the gifts of na
ture ami the results of art .

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