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The Western news. [volume] (Libby, Mont.) 1933-current, August 03, 1933, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82006551/1933-08-03/ed-1/seq-3/

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Uncovering a 5,000-Year-Old City in Egypt
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These ruins of an Egyptian city believed to be nearly ô.Oüü years old were discovered neai the fourth pyramid
and about an eighth of a mile from the sphinx. Dr. Selim Hassan of the University of Cairo and his party have brought
light hundreds of beautiful pottery vessels, the remains of old grain bins, and fireplaces. It is believed to be the
first discovery of a residential community of undent Egypt and It Is thought that the city was Inhabited by the priest*
who performed the rites at the nearby tombs.
to
Reclaiming the Pontine Marshes in Italy
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View of the new city of l.ittoria, Italy, built on land reclaimed frSm the Pontine marshes by Premier Mussolini's
plan. In the background Is the road which Joins Ltttoria to the Applan Way, running through reclaimed land now
cultivated, -:- : -.
Queen of National Cherry Festival
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Morelia Oldham, who was selected as queen of the national cherry festival
In Traverse City, Mich., center of the great cherry belt. Before the fete Morelia
went to Washington to present a box of cherries to President Roosevelt
Wins Crown and Meal Ticket for Life
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Norlne 11 of Prospect was crowned "dairy queen" at the meeting of the
Wisconsin Dairymen's association. She won the life time meal ticket and the
wreath of alfalfa because she Is the famed mother of a famous line of cowa,
und for 18 yeara she has averaged 387 pounds of butterfat, which, whether or
got you know your batterfat 1* some record.
ENVOY TO PORTUGAL
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Robert G. Caldwell of Houston,
Texas, has been named United State*
minister to Portugal by President
Roosevelt He was born on August 31,
1882, and Is a graduate of Princeton.
He Is an author and college professor.
WORLD RECORD MAKER
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Jack Lovelock of Oxford university,
England, who broke the world'« record
for the mile run at Princeton, winning
the event In 4 minutes 7.0 seconds.
The Prlnceton-Cornell team won the
meet from the Oxford-Cambridge team.
When Rom* Writhed
Pahsanlus—l hear that Nero was
torturing the Christians again last
night
Demeter—Someone ought to take
that fiddle away fro» hlm.-Boaton
Transcript *
The Penny
By ELOISE BENNETT
C by McClur* N«w>p»p«r Syndicat».
WNU 8«rvlc*. *
'V' OU may go home, now, Thomas."
* Laura McElroy settled her
small and aged body back comfortably
against the taupe reloura of her car,
surveying with satisfaction the assort
ment of small package* -by her side.
Between the thin, veined forefinger
and thumb of her left hand she held
a penny. After her eyes had wandered
appraisingly over the packages they
turned on the penny..
It was an Indian "head penny,
had come Into Mrs. McEliroy's posses
sion not two minutes before In the
change from the Jig-saw puzzle she
had bought It would do for the day's
gift to ten-year-old Bobby.
Every afternoon,
weather interfered, Thomas, the Mc
Elroy chauffeur for twenty years, took
Mrs. Anthony McElroy, senior, on a
shopping expedition from the house
where she lived with her son and her
grandson. On this expedition she did
such small errands as the varldus busy
members of the family needed. And
always, at the end of the trip, there
was one final errand, some knick
knack for Bobby, her great-grandson.
Thomas fidgeted slightly. "Quite
sure you're finished, Mrs. McElroy ?"
he questioned.
''Yes, thank you, Thomas. Oh—
you're thinking of Bobby! Yes, I've
an Indian head penny for him. He's
collecting coins, you know,"
Thomas chuckled,
stamps and cellophane and old pipe*
and—"
Mrs. McElroy went on;
specially Indian head pennies. He
wants to make a fortune with them.
He's heard they're worth more than
a cent now and he's trying to corner
the market so that when they go up
he can sell them."
Thomas, relieved, let the cat out
a bit and Mrs. McElroy turned the
penny over in her fingers and looked
at the date. An old one, 1866. She
closed her eyes.
She had been—let's see, ten years
old, In 1866. On a June day In that
year she had found a penny, too.
remembered that she and John Martin
had been walking home together from
school. How the city had changed
since then! There had been country
lanes where there were city pave
ments now. And where she had lived,
up near Fifty-ninth streets, there had
been a little pond that all the children
loved. Choked under cement, now, of
course, the springs and streams that
ii
It
unless extreme
And
Yes'm.
M Yes. And
She
fed It, She and John had
the shade at the side of the pond on
their way home.
"I wish we had some candy," John
had said.
"Would you divide?" she had asked.
"I'd give you more than half," John
had said.
"Would you, John? Oh, thank you.
Oh. look ! Some money I"
And there In the grass at their feet
she had spied a penny—bright and
new and shining. "Look, John. We'll
go buy some candy. You carry the
money."
So John had taken charge of their
'It's our special penny," he had
Til mark It for ours.'
find,
said.
then they had sat on the grass while
he scraped away with his knife at
the edge of the penny to mark it for
And
their own.
"It's brand new," he had said.
"Look—It has this year's date!"
He let her feel the ridge with her
finger nail, right In front of the tip
of the Indian's nose. ''Now let's go
buy some candy.'
"Laura,
John had bragged,
going to be rich some day when I grow
up. I'm going to have piles and piles
of money. And I'm going to marry
you and give you half of It. And
we'll have candy each day."
Tm
John Martin—well, he'd been right.
He'd laid the foundation of the great
fortune that his grandsons were work
ing so hard to hold together today.
She turned over the worn old coin in
her fingers. Her nail caught In a
worn ridge at Its edge. She opened
her eyes and looked, with a little
breathless start of Interest There It
was—the deep ridge, right at the point
of the Indian's nose, worn smooth and
even.
This was the same coin.
John hadn't forgotten. He had gone
West to win his wealth. He had asked
her to wait for him and she had half
promised. But then Anthony McElroy
—poor, then, too, though he did well
enough later on—had come along and
she had forgotten John and her half
promise. And when he had come back
from the West with a small fortune al
ready his, he had found her promised
to Tony.
But there was that coin In her hand,
a part of John's struggle. The very
same coin.
"Thomas," Mrs. McElroy said to the
'Perhaps you'd better not
chauffeur,
go home yet. Go back to Wlnshlps'
and I'll buy Bobby that new stamp
album he wants. I'll keep this old
penny.'
Coin Sell* for $2,080
Numismatists flocked to a rare coin
sale held In Paris at the Hotel Dfrouot
recently, where $ 2,080 was paid for a
tetradrachma struck at Amphlpolls
(Macedonia), and $660 went for a
silver decadrnchma struck at Syra
cuse. In 1878 , only $50 was paid for
the coin sold here for $ 2 , 080 . Other
rare coins sold for from $.'!60 to $ 244 ,
and the entire sale netted the auction
house a sum of 241,000 francs, or
$9,640.
urn
an<3U||[w
Hum
OBEDIENT
The doctor smilingly entered the
room where hla female patient was
reclining In a chair.
•'Ah," he murmured, "1 see you
are looking very much better today."
"Yes, doctor," the patient said, "I
have very carefully followed the In
structions on that bottle of medicine
you gave me."
''Let me see, now," said the doc
tor thoughtfully. 'What were they?"
''Keep the bottle well corked,"
came the reply.—Somerset (Eng.)
Standard.
Gone!
Tourist (having looked over his
toric castle, to butler)—We've made
a stupid mistake. I tipped his lord
ship Instead of you.
Butler—That's awkward. I'll never
get it now.—Wall Street Journal,
Can't Expect Muck
Passenger—la this train ever on
time?
"Sir," replied the guard, "wo never
worry about her being on time. We're
satisfied If she's always on the rail."
—Edmonton Bulletin,
Worldly Advico
Sorority Frosh—He Is all the world
to me. What would you advise me
to do?
Been There—See a little more of
the world, my dear.—Montreal Ga
zette.
Would Prove Heredity
Wife—That mean thing called
mother a cat Pd like to scratch her
eyes out.
Hub—Don't try It. my dear; she'd
have too good a comeback.—Boston
Evening Transcript.
Curious
"What would happen If this elevator
should drop to the bottom?" asked
th: nervous passenger as they drew
near the top of Ihe skyscraper.
"Gosh," exclaimed the elevator girl,
turning pale at the very Idea,
lose my Job!"
I'd
CROSS-WORD PUZZLE
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13
18
17
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23
2.7
If 20
27
26
24
29
30
29
34
36
55*
33
32
31
40
39
38
37
43
41
41
47
46
44 4ST
50
49
49
52
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Horizontal.
1—Splendor
I— Caprice
•—Reward for services
WO—Morning
11—Motor car erganlsatlon (Ini
tials)
II—Heavy coat
11—Tendona
17—Fsslers
II— Burden
II—Southern state (abbr.)
1]—Sense of responsibility
14—Register showing rank
servies
M—One who easts malignant
glances
II_Alasi
3» —Exclamation (poetic)
10— Ridge of sand peculiar to
Sweden
11— Cudgels
14—To convince
17—Scent
$g—Worthless O
40— Extremely smell particle
41— What youngsters delight to
hear but adults dread (two
words)
44—Girl's pet name
46—To disjoin
48—Affirmative
41—Sky bins
40— Mournful
41— To look pleased
St—Bends out
of
\
i
ENTHUSIASTIC
It was a wretched play. Lon* be
fore the Interval the audience began
to boo and hiss. Bat there waa one
man who clapped hla hands rigor
ously.
"I say,"- said the man next to him,
"you've got a nerve to applaud thla
shocking play. What can you see
In itr
The man smiled.
"It's not the play I'm applauding,"
he replied heartily, "It's the hissing."
—London Answers.
Onch!
Spinster—Why don't you get mar
ried, Mr. Oldbach?
Oldbach—Why
marry a woman
when I can buy a parrot for $5?
Spinster—Yes, that shows once
more how the men have the ad
We can't buy
vantage of us women,
any kind of a bear for less than $200.
—Pathfinder Magazine.
Soaked Him
"I suppose at the efficiency ex
pert's wedding you didn't do anything
so wasteful as throwing rice."
"Oh, yes we did; but as a conces
sion to his teaching we had the rice
done up in cotton bags, each missile
weighing two pounds,"
POETIC EDITOR
&
j n itam
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T
Poet—How do you like my poem
on spring?
Editor—It's like spring Itself.
Poet—How's that?
Editor—Very fine—In spots.
Maybe on WLS
A board was testing the mentality
of a negro,
"Do you ever hear voices without
being able to tell who is speaking or
where the sound comes from?"
"Yessuh," answered the negro.
"And when does this occur?"
"Over the radio."
Almost Human
"An old fowl was recently dlscov
ered to hav e two hearts."—News
Item.
Sounds like the bridge partner 1
had last week.—Smith's Weekly.
Vertical.
1—Snakvllk* ft«h
I—Embroidered girdle
I—Benediction
4—Flery-tempered peraoa
I—Treaeurer
I— West Indian plant
7—Emperor
I—to steer a ship wildly
»— Rase
11—Fall fiower
14—Woman who leaves a will
14— Indispensable
II—Man's ntoknam*
10— Hover
15— Backward (prefix)
11— One of our moet valuable orgaaa
j7—Goddess of the morning (Greek)
H —Spoils of war
II—a mysticism among Mohaas»
medans
II—Involuntary convulsion through
nose
14— Attract
15— Extrems
31—To bury
II— Mlddlewestsrn state (abbr.)
41—Old English gold coin
41—A city of anolsnt Paleetl*»
44—Matters (Latin)
47—Wheat state (abbr.)

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