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The Western news. [volume] (Libby, Mont.) 1933-current, August 08, 1946, Image 4

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Erickson Leads by
Majority of 490
count
of votes cast by Montana electors
in the July 16 primary was corn-j
pleted by the state canvassing
board.
Results of the torrid battle
tween Burton K. Wheeler and Leif
Erickson for the democratic nomi
nation for U. S. Senator showed
Erickson polled 4,906 votes over
Wheeler. Total votes cast for Erick
son were 49,419 while Wheeler
ceived 44,513.
On the republican side of
senatorial nominee race, Zales
Ecton polled 22,731 votes to 11.
226 for R. E. Skeen.
official
Helena—(U.R)—An
Petroleum scientists, equipped
with a diving chamber and using
radar to plot positions, soon will
launch a search for oil in the rock|
and sand beneath the surface
2,000 square miles of water in
northwest Bahamas.
The exploration will be conducted
by Standard Oil Company (Baha
mas) Limited, a subsidiary
Standard Oil Company (New
sey), in the shallow waters north
of Grand Bahama Island. East
West Palm Beach, F lorida, and
separated from the mainland
the relatively deep water of
Florida straits, the site is in
section of the Atlantic Ocean where
the water in most places is less
than 20 feet deep.
Engineers will sink the diving
chamber at various points in the
area to map the ocean floor. The
diving chamber will house an opera
lor and a gravity meter, an in
strument that measures the pull
gravity, furnishes indications of the
type of rocks below the ocean bed,
and indirectly provides information
as to the presence of oil. If geo-1
physical reports are favorable, over-1
water rigs will be erected later
fer drilling tests
On the surface, the use of radar
will permit geophysicists to plot
the site of all tests with improved
accuracy. Radar targets 50 feet
high wiil be set up at strategic
points in the exploration
These targets, picked up on the
radar screen aboard the equipment
boat, will enable the navigator
determine his position,
The diving chamber to be used
is cylindrical in shape, six feet high
and weighs about two tons. It
equipped with various safety de
PETROLEUM SCIENTISTS
SEARCH FOR OIL
vices, including a safety hatch, and
a compressed air blower which can
be used to free the chamber if
becomes mired in mud. The opera
tor in the chamber is in constant
. , , .. ... , •
telephone communication with h.s
associates aboard s*np.
In the search for Possible reser
voirs of petroleum beneath the blue
waters of the Bahamas, the oil men
are using a vessel formerly opera
0 ted by the Canadian Navy m anti
submarine work. The 112-foot ship
the Stanba, is one of the first era
ever to be equipped with radar in
the search for oil. It is equippec
with a deep freeze unit that insures
a wide variety of foods and extra
fresh water, and it will receive sup
plies regularly from thé nearoy
camp,
The Stanba recently arrived at
Nassau with its cargo of mstru
ments and soon will shove off for
the first six weeks of mapping.
During the tests, the ship's party
of 20 men will remain on the water
for six weeks, and then return to
their neai by camp at West End Is
land in the Bahamas for rest.
EGG YOLK SHOULD BE
OF LIGHT INTENSITY
Standards for grading eggs place!of
emphasis upon yolk visibility Both
of white!
f the voik.
yolk color and firmm
determine the visibility
and separation of these two factors
by candling is difficult. It. therefore.
becomes desirable to produce eggs
with yolk color of light to medium
intensity.
Green feed, either fresh or dried,
and yellow corn are the major feeds
providing yolk color. About 50 to
60 per cent of yellow corn in the
ration, from 5 to 10 per cent of al
falfa in the mash, or 5 pounds of
green feed per 100 birds daily pro
vide adequate vitamin A for good
health in a poultry flock.
The of study
of egg yolk color as affected by cer
tain ingredients of common poultry
feeds conducted at the Kansas State
College is of interest.
1. —The color of the yolk may
deepen as much as 24 per cent in
one day. The greatest advance oc
curs during the first six days of
feeding after which the advance is
at a much slower rate.
2. —A well-balanced mash con
taining not over eight per cent al
falfa and 24 per cent yellow corn
gives a uniformly light golden yolk
when the birds are confined and
equal parts of white corn and wheat
were used as the scratch grain,
3. —Feeding alfalfa hay either in
the litter or in a wall hopper in
creases yolk color (as much as 4.54
units) and gives a wide variation
in the eggs from the same flock,
4. —Limited time (4:00 p. m. un
til dark) on green wheat range in
creased yolk color 2.3 units while
the same flock allowed wheat range
ad libitum increased the yolk color
4.52 units.
DEMOS VOTING PERCENTAGE
GOES UP IN PRIMARY
Helena—(U.R)—A higher percen
tage of democratic votes was cast
in the July 16 primary election than
in the past four primaries, accord
ing to the state canvassing board.
A check revealed 73 per cent of
the total vote, or 93,932 votes, were
democratic while 27 per cent of the
total vote, or 33, 957 votes, were
republican. A total of 127,889
votes were cast.
' "EQUIVELANT" DIPLOMAS
FOR EX-SERVICEMEN
! Helena—(U.R)—Ex-servicemen who)
have not graduated from high
school may now obtain an "equiva-,
i en t" diploma by passing a general
| education development test, accord
j n g
j superintendent of public instruction,
N.
Elizabeth
Ireland.
statt
to
CARTER OIL COMPANY
PROMOTES OFFICIALS
Election of Robert B. Curran and
Paul C. Shea, Carter officials. Bil
lings, Montana, as vice presidents
of The Carter Oil Company was
announced Monday. July 22. by
President O. C. Schorp following a
meeting of the Board of Directors.
Shea was also named a member of
the Board of Directors. Announce
ment of the election was made at
Billings Monday night by President
Schorp at a dinner attended by key
Carter representatives. Shea, who
'will be vice president in charge of
• manufacturing and will direct all
( refining operations, will transfer
b j s headquarters to Tulsa. Curran
of will continue as Northwest Division
Manager and
lings.*
Curran. 37. has been a director
since April. A native of Tulsa he
ot ' joint'd Carter in 1933 after gradua
Jer-jtion from the University of Okla
j noma with a degree in geology,
of i Shea. 41. will complete 20 years
j with the Jersey organization next
August 9. Born at Roxbury. Mass.,
in 1905 he finished high school at
a | Lynn, Mass., was graduated from
\ Northeastern University at Boston
; and took special work at Massachu
setts Institute of Technology.
began his oil career August 9, 1926.
———————
TO HALT ALL UNAUTHORIZED
j CONSTRUCTION IN STATE
, . , . .
[ he civilian production administr
tl0n - . . ,. . r
jjei°me G. Locke, state director of
^P A ' said compliance division of
Leers had been ordered into the
[ [ ie * d afteI ' a survey revealed work
^ a d st°PP^d on approximately half
; of (he 2.300 authorized veterans
h orrc J> under construction in Mon
; tana because of a critical shortage
area.:?/ vir - *, ua u * a °/ n materia ■
said between 40 nd 50 per cent
commercial construction was
.standing idle because the demand
was far 8 reater than Production.
i
| Mrtnf /'2j r | TnlfDC
*▼»'«1111. VJIII I UNCa
Golf Toiimey
will remain at Bil
He
Helena—(U.R)—A concerted drive
to halt all unauthorized construction
in the state has been announced by
j
)
i
I Helena—(U.R)—Montana's 16-year
old womens golf champion, Edean
.Anderson, invaded Utah territory
|to walk off with the fifth ann ual
Fred Tedesco golf tournament by
downi Mrs , w E Fellows, four
and three in th finals
The Montana golf wizard,
who w ' n h f r first state B champion
shi when she was 14 had utt]el
any
breezed through the last few holes
of match j then mopping her
forehead she remarked onlv that
she wag happv t0 have won tbe
tournament '
, n
Bt.si-sti.LUC o.> sttettrs
Walk In The Sun." Harry
ij r 0 w ni' s sensational best-seller
cornfcs t be scre en of the Kootenai
Theatre Sunday and Monday, Aug
ust u and 12 in Lewis Milestone's
eagerly-awaited film version star
r ;ng Dana Andrews.
Brown, who was in the army for
jovor foiir years, wrote "A Walk
In The Sun" while correspondent
On
for Yank magazine in London.
lits appearance, it was hailed as one
the most outstanding books to
come out ef the war,
Presented by 20th Century-Fox,
the screen drama features in its
cast Richard Conte. George Tyne,
John Ireland,
Richard Benedict.
Sterling Holloway,
Herbert Kudley,
Norman Lloyd and Lloyd Bridges,
fire Gains on
THE NATION
The National» Board of Fire Un
derwriters reports an alarming in
crease in fire losses. During June,
for example, the nation's loss total
led more than $44.000,000, an in
crease of 29 per cent over June,
1945. And the total for the first
six months of this year reached
the record-breaking figures of $297,
306,000.
aggregate fire loss for any single
full year from 1933 throuh 1940. (
Another indication of the trend
is that, normally, fire losses show
substantial decline during the sum-:
mer months. This June the season-:
al decline was extremely small, the
loss being only 4 per cent under ;
that of May.
The responsibility for controlling
fires rests upon everyone who owns |
or rents property, everyone who
operates and works in a business, i
For fire prevention, so far as the.
average individual is - concerned, j
consists of easy, simple things. The
renewal of a worn electrical cord j
may prevent a disaster that would ;
destroy a home. . Proper storage of |
inflammable mateials may pre-1
vent a conflagation that would des
troy a factory. A simple repair to
a heating plant may prevent a blaze
that would destroy lives.
The figures -the National Board
has issued should be of concern to
us all. To put them in words, they
mean that we are losing the war
against fire. They mean that val
uable materials, many of them vir
tually irreplaceable at this time, are
being needlessly destroyed. They |
mean ruin and death and desolation. !
All our efforts are needed to re
verse this ominous trend.
This is greater than the
Mrs. Sheldon Thompson and
Bobby of Okinogan. Wn., are visit
ing at the home of Mrs. Thomp
son.
I
Seek Meat-Type Chickens
|
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!
j
* * -
V
Montana-grown chickens will be bigger In the future If E. R. Hal
brook, head of Poultry Department. Montana State College (left*, and
Fay Mueller. Burlington, Kansas breeder, have their way. The men are
inspecting painting of Chicken-of-Tomorrow, for which A&P Tea Com
pany offers S5.000 award in a three-year breeding contest. They are
pictured at recent International Baby Chick meeting in St. Louis, Mo.,
which was attended by over 6,000 p.
ymen.
FEUD IN !
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i TOO MUCH SENSE
i Those who forecast that the dem
lise of the OPA at the end of June
would result in immediate and un
i controlled inflation showed insuf
ficient faith in the wisdom of the
American people—and in the ef
ficiency of the production and dis
jtribution machines which serve:
them.
Prices, of course, rose in many
instances. This was due in a num
ber of cases to the elimination of
government subsidies—the consumer
simply started to pay all the costs
out of his pocket at the time of
purchase, instead of the govern
ment paying part of his living
In other cases, past
through taxes.
OPA prices had been toolow. and
increases were justified and ine\i
table. But in no instance did the
upward price spiral go on and on
i without end.
j
: resistance.
One reason for that is consumer
The average American
isn't a sucker. If prices for cer
tain commodities go too high, he
simply goes on without them orj
buys substitutes.
Another reason is
a slow but
[definite increase in supply in many
i basic lines. As more goods enter
the free market, the opportunities
for the black marketeer and chisler
diminish. They prosper only in an
economic of scarcity.
Discount
O
20
O
on
Baby
Buggies
and
Strollers
t ii
&
Y)
Strollers Were $12.95 - Now $9.35
ALSO KIDDIE KARS
JAQUETH & CHARNHOLM
. .
| A third reason is the very fine,
work done by distributors, led by j
the chain systems, in voluntarily;
controlling prices, in opposing
hoarding, and in keeping the largest |
possible stocks available at all
times. Retail merchandising is
amazingly free of profiteering j
greed.
Whatever the future of price con-j
trol, we should not depend on it |
to prevent dangerous inflation—it:
a lone cannot instill the desire to j
produce, save and reduce debt, j
which is essential to a sound econ*
omy and the only permanent cure;
tor inflation.
"It should be called 'parental
Hal-!
l
delinquency ."—Police
Chief
lowell. Elkins Park, Pa,, placing
blame for juvenile delinquency.
"Représentai ivc democracy is that
kind of government in which self-j
restraint is substituted for external;
H. W. Prcntis, Jr., in- !
restraint."
dustrialist, Lancaster, Pa.
Federal income taxes on indi
viduals. reflecting record-breaking
collections all along the line, in |
1945 totalled $19,885.275,248.86.
cr's available income in 1945 went
into payrolls.
96Uc of a Cleveland manufactur- !
Third Nat'l Trout
Derby, August 11
Livingston—(U.R)—The third an-,
nual national trout derby will get
j underway on the Yellowstone River,
Augst 11, in the first renewal of
the event since 1942.
D ., , , , T
Both former derby winners Lon
me Bryan of Big Timber, and Henry
Jondrow. are expected to take part.
More persons than ever before are
expected to contend for honors.
derby officials said.
Principal speaker at the sports
1 men's banquet will be Larry Smith,
i nationally known radio commenta
j tor, who will award a $1,000 check
1 to the sportsman bringing in the
I largest trout.
A SNEAK ATTACKER
SNAT: A word of vulgar poten
tialities and insulting insinuations.
A contraction of Sneak Attacker.—
Don't, oh don't, ever be a SNAT!
Every time I flaunt or break a
safety rule I am being a Snat, or
sneak attacker, because I am attack
ing without warning. 'Attacking
someone, maybe a stranger, maybe
one of my own loved ones. Doesn't
that make it worse? Not an enemy,
but one of my own loved ones.
I make a left turn without proper
signal and the truck behind me
I crashes into my car, injuring—per
| haps killing—members of my fam
j ily. I have pulled a sneak attack
1 on my own flesh and blood. All
through life I have given a daugh
ter protection and provided com
j forts for her but, today. I staged
a sneak attack on her and killed
her child. That shrivels something
in her heart and spirit. She can
not love a Snat. And how about
the truck driver? It wasn't his fault,
but a Snat involved him in the
death of a child. All through life
his soul will carry that scar. A
kindly soul seared and scarred by
a Snat.
I scuttle across the street in the
middle of the block,
me step from the curb because I
ooze between two parked
Sneak attack! Traffic
brakes and twists and turns in fran
tic effort to save—a Snat. Well, it
is a successful sneak attack. I am
hit. The support and protection my
dependents have the right to expect
from me is suddenly withdrawn.
Three cars collide in their efforts to
avoid me.
age, but never mind that.
an injured back, a lacerated face,
a broken nose. Three
people tortured. Really—a Snat of
the first slime.
I jump a light. One of these
minute and second saving snats. I
invade a peaceful and safe terri
tory. I catch women and children
off guard. It is not
No one sees
cars.—
slams on
There is material dam
There is
innocent
a courageous
EVER HAVE A
FEATHERED RIDE?
Try Our
SHOCK ABSORBER
SERVICE
Are you still getting new car smoothness from your
shock absorbers? If not- perhaps they're short of
fluid. Let our experts tell you. The fluid in shock
absorbers should be checked regularly. Have yours
checked today ....
LIBBY
« 5 ?°°
MOTORS
0 «"
ART BROCK
Across From Kootenai Theatre
South Libby Purity Store
BABY FOODS
23c
Gerber's - 3 Cans
FARINA
34c
5 Pound Bags
GROUND CHOCOLATE
32c
Guittard' 1 Pound Cans
ALUMINUM FOILRAPP
6Sc
4
25 Feet
DIAPER PANTY
135
With 50 Diaper Pads Included
/
j attack. It is not an even break.
! It is a sneak by a Snat.
I toss my goggles aside. I do
j not fasten my safety belt, I climb
: a weakened or broken ladder. I
; pull a light cord with wet hands.
What a versatile Snat
,. p
* 001 ! "®P a -
wa ? he - . . . _ _ ,
, How not to be a Snat. Its easy,
stop thinking about myself.
»top dwelling upon my own im
portance Stop! Think of others
Think of the man behind think
of my fami j y think of the stan ger
who is trusting me. Think of the
other fellow and give him that
ute or se cond of time I do not need
and will never miss.
Stop! Don't be a Snat!
mm
PERSONAL
Mrs. Ed Smith and Miss Ruth
Grusli visited in Sylvanite Sunday.
Clarence Larson left Friday to
spend several days in Spokane.
Glen Thom flew to Spokane
and back Friday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. Evan Yaple spent
Sunday visiting friends in Kalispell.
Tom Brindley, who has been
visiting for the past month in Mis
soula, returned home last Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Dick Griffith and
Mr. and Mrs. Klas Johansson spent
Sunday at Warland.
Mrs. Catherine Halsey spent a
few days in Spokane last week
business.
"We don't know when the next
war will come, but we must be pre
pared."—Lt. Gen Jimmy Doolittle.
There are 55,114.143 people in
the United States who have
pleted eight or more years of school
ing.
on
com
3
Experience
. . . In repairing and selling
watches for the past thirty
years, has taught us what to
sell; and judgment in our
guarantees.
. . . If we tell you it is a good
watch, you may be sure it
will prove good.
, . . ASK ANYBODY!
Buckingham
Jewelry Store
In the Odd Fellow Building

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