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The Western news. [volume] (Libby, Mont.) 1933-current, April 17, 1947, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82006551/1947-04-17/ed-1/seq-4/

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Senator Ecton
Writes About Border
Patrol Difficulty ,
/
By Charles D. Rowe
A great amount of discussion has
been caused by that order coming
out from Washington to discharge
most if not all of the customs patrol
men along the U. S.-Canadian bor
der. Ne
ands of
been received by congressmen ob
jecting to the reducing of the border
oatrol and thereby, as it is feared,
throwing the border open to smug
gling.
This matter is of real interest to
Lincoln county people, since a num
ber of customs patrolmen have been
stationed at EUfeka for many years.
Regardless of what is the final
outcome of this attempted niov'
for economy by the congress, it is
interesting to r^ad what a Montana
senator has to say regarding the
pr oposal. In 'i letter to Ire writer
of this column Senator Zalcs N.
Ecton, says, in part:
"This reduction (in the approp
riation) according to the House
Committee was made in part at
least for the 'following reasons: 'the
Committee is informed that both
the immigration border patrol and
the customs border patrol operate
along the Canadian and Mexican
borders, and yet .ttiere is no cor
relation or cooperation in their ac
tivity.' " . • ■ '
"The Committee apparently felt
that by coordination instead of dup
lication between the two federal
departments involved, the number of
patrolmen employed by each depart
ment could be reduced .writh no im
pairment of service."
Senator Ecton said further.
"Due to the tremendous expense
of the war, together with many
olher federal activities instituted by
the Administra* ion during the past
years, there is now a detei mined
cflort on the part of fhe Republican
wspapers report that thous
telegrams and letters.have
members of the Congress as well as
some Democratic members o* the
Congress to make very material re
ductions wherever possible in ovdor
that the credit of this nation may
remain solvent. If this is not done,
no one will suffer more in the long
run than the American public.
"Naturally I do not want reduc
tions in appropriations for activities
or functions basic to,the welfare of
Montana. Nevertheless,! feel that
it is necessary to work for reduction
in federal expenditures where and
whenever it would be sound
economy to do so."
Many reports are to the effect
that there are increasing signs of
a dip in prices And the long-suf
fering public will welcome this news
—if it proves true.
The United States News, of Wash
ington. D. C., said in its April 4
issue:
"More cautious buying by con
sumers is widely reported. Spending
is not as free and easy as it tyas.
Night clubs are reporting this trend
in almost every city, and liquor
sales are declining. When pork
prices shot up .recently, housewives
backed away so rapidly that prices
came down in the face of scant
supplies.
"The expected Easter buying
spree failed to develop. Women who^
last year bought an entire spring
outfit were content this year with
a single garment or coat. Sales
were disappointing for hats, shoes,
purses, costume jewelry and expen
sive cosmetics."
Tfcie article goes on to say that
men's shirts are remaining on deal
ers' shelves at marked-up prices.
Men's suits are becoming more
plentiful. Furniture sales are run
ning into buyer resistance. Re
tailers are buying more cautiously
^ and in smaller amounts because of a
possible price drop.
Someone in Spokane recently took
a poll among that city's high school
students. They were asked a num
ber of questions. One conclusion
was that the young people felt they
would be able to do a better job
of running the world than their
parents had.
That was not a surprising con
- elusion. High school students gener
ally are of that opinion. In fact,
it's extremely difficult for parents
to give aforesaid students any advice
whatsoever. Because in the eyes of
so many, many high school young
sters, parents are just too hopelessly
old-fashioned, and know so little.
All of which is, in a way, amusing.
Youth is always going to remake
Uie world. I remember there was
a lot of claptrap
the end oi World War I. At
time there were many addlepated
thinkers who were preaching in
press and from platform that "youth
was going to save the world." And
it's pertinent to ask whether or not
the youth of that time haven't made
a pretty sorry mess of most every
thing today.
Never in the history of the na
tion has there been so much crime.
Never has there been such a juv
enile delinquency problem, and
juveniles of today are the children
of the youths of the World War I
period. Never have we had so many
divorces as at the present time.
Drunkenness among women is on
the increase and is the-highest in
the nation's history. And similar*
conditions are found all along the
line.
talked following
that
the
All of which doesn't mean that
we are necessarily going to perdi
tation, although some may think
with reason that we have made a
very good start in that direction.
. As a matter of fact evety genera
tion has its problems to meet And
every generation makes its mistakes.
It's utter claptrap to talk about one
generation making such terrible
mistakes and that the on-coming
generation is going to be so wise
that no such errors will be made.
Well, that just isn't in the cards.
We can expect to hear high school
students sajjjng they will run the
X..
CHANGES MADE IN
WAA PROGRAM
A conference of
War Assets Administration officials
here reported that changed con
ditions in surplus property supplies
and markets were the basis for
realignment in administration of
WAA, '
Zone administrator Paul G. Rut
ten, San Francisco, declared, ' We
are getting close to the bottom of
the barrel . . . this calls for simpli
fication of our organization to pro
tect the interests of the taxpayers."
Principal changes in the WAA
program are:
1. No War Assets offices will
be closed, but as regional inven
tories are sold out, such functions
as warehousing and other manage
ment details will be dropped grad
ually, with resultant decrease in
personnel.
2. Equitable distribution of re
maining inventories among the sev
eral western regions will be im
proved, making a wider selection
of merchandise available to Mon
tana buyers through WAA centers
in Helena, Missoula, Butte. Billings,
Sidney and Great Falls
3. Orders for any surplus prop
erty available in the nation will bo
taken at the local centers.
Helena—(U.R)
world better than did their parents,
That's natural for them to think
that way. But we don't expect to see
them do it. The youths of today
and tomorrow will still be humans
and humanity is prone to err.
LAWLOR TO DISCONTINUE
SERVICES TO LINCOLN CO.
Due to circumstances beyond con
trol, Earl V. Lawlor, Veterans Ad
ministration Contact Representative
will be required to discontinue
itinerant service to Lincoln and Lake
counties until further notice. Notice
will be sent when itinerant service
is resumed. /I*
C&R
FARM SERVICE
FEED and HAY
LIBBY, MONTANA
Peruna Chick Starting Mash which contains all the
needed foods for first six weeks feeding.
Also Checker tabs for sterilizing baby chick's drink
ing water.
Centennial Chick Starter and Scratch
J. A. Courtright and Stuart Risley
Phone 20F3 or 20-M or call at farm 1 mile South of City Limits
-PRICES CASH
new MEDICAL EXPENSE policy
Pays toward
• DOCTOR BILLS
Up to $150.00
• ADDITIONAL FEES
Up to $15.0«
• SURGEONS FEES
From $5.00 to $150.00 in Surgical cases instead of the
per treatment Medical Fees.
• MATERNITY CARE
Doctor bills up to $50.00 for maternity care after policy
has been in force 10 months. Hospitalization not required.
O COST
Special Family Combination Plan costs $3.00 a month.
J. R. MILLS
P. O. BOX 1131
North American Accident Insurance Company
PHONE 20F51
Save Tires,.. Save Money
with
Good Wheel Alignment
And Wheel Balance Service
Do You Know?
a
When a wheel is only H inch out
of alignment, the tire is dragged
travel. Rubber is scraped off! Tires
. sidewise 87 feet in every mile ot
> wear out fast - and cost you money!
• Avoid rapid and costly tire wear by regular in
spection for proper wheel alignment and wheel bal
It's important that the inspection be made
right! If out-of-line or out-of-balance conditions exist,
it's equally important that they be corrected promptly
and accurately, by factory-trained mechanics who
know how to do the job right . . .
ance.
PLAY SAFE!—HAVE WHEELS CHECKED FOR
ALIGNMENT AND BALANCE EVERY 90 DAYS
LIBBY ^'MOTORS
ART BROCK
Across From Kootenai Theatre
URAL ITEMS
a
Mr. and Mrs, Bud Dunwoodie and
daughters of Somers were week
end guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Graham,
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Fritsch drove
to Eureka Sunday.
Mrs. Hedge Hammons and Ray
were in Eureka Saturday.
The Card Club met with Mrs
O. T. Beagle Thursday. Mrs. C.
Kilpatrick was awarded both high
and traveling prizes, and Mrs. J,
Kilpatrick won consolation. A deli
cious lunch was served by the hos
tess at the close of the afternoon.
Mrs. C. G. Kilpatrick will entertain
the club next week.
Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Gregor
of Eureka visited at the Fritsch
home this week.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Isrealson drove
to Eureka Saturday evening.
Mr, and Mrs. Jerry Fritsch were
Libby shoppers Saturday.
Uraland Grange Day
Uraland Grangers met at the hall
at Warland Sunday, for a clean-up
and repair session. New windows
were installed, some
and one chimney bui
served a hearty meal at noon
twenty hungry workers.
SOIL CONSERVATION WILL
SPONSOR NEWSPAPER
CONTEST
Bozeman—(U.R)—M. P. Hansmeier
extension soil conservations! ; at
Montana State College, has an
nounced a soil conservation news
paper contest sponsored by the Mon
tana Association of Soil Conser
vation district supervisors. The
contest, open to all weekly news
papers, offers $525 in U. S. Savings
bonds to the winner. The com
i peting newspapers must publish one
| edition in which soil conservation
and its relation to local and na
painting done.
It. The laiics
*
l tional welfare is featured.
MACKS* AND FAMOS PLATND
WITH M8U SYMPHONIC BAND
Missoula—James Maurer, Libby,
and Martin Parris, Troy, played
with the State University Sym
phonic Band in concert Sunday,
closing the- annual state solo and
small ensemble music festival
the campus over the weekend.
Maurer, a 1946 graduate of Libby
high school, is a freshman, and
Farris, an army veteran and 1943
graduate of Troy high school, is
social science major.
Farris also was elected president
of Sigma Phi Epsilon, social frater
nity on the campus, during the
week.
R.
to
Heredity means that if your
grandfather didn't have any child
ren, then your father probably
wouldn't have had any either and
neither would you have had any,
probably.
Welding!
Now is the time to think
of your farm equipment
for Spring Work . . . .
HARTLE'S
WELDING & MACHINE
SHOP
HIGHEST PRICES
Year 'round
for
CREAM and EGGS
COMMERCIAL
CREAMERY CO.
"Serving since 1908"
S 159 Cedar Spokane, Wn.
There's Gold in Them
JfKM
• That Buttery richness in all
our baked goods come from
one source; pure, nutritious
ingredients! Enjoy these taste
tempters today!
Libby Bakery
mm I
M
I
•■»I
I
- \
If You Plan To Build
If you plan to build this season, you should have your plans ready now and be
arranging to secure your building materials. If your present comfortable home
needs repairs, do not delay arranging to have the work done. The time to
repair the house and other buildings is naw as soon as they need the repairs . . .
Though building materials are easier to obtain than during the past few years,
a government permit is still needed, This company will be pleased to help you
make out your application for the permit and to check your, building plans.
J. Neils Lumber Company's Retail Department deals in Piaster, Cement, Ma
sonry Cement, Brick, Flue Liner, Sewer Pipe, Cedar Shingles, Composition
Shingles, Rolled Roofing, Building Papers, Zonolite and Glass wool Insulation,
Heatilator Fireplaces, Sash, Doors, Frames and built-in Ironing Çoard cabinets.
BRUCE FLOOR FINISHES - OLYMPIC SHAKES FOR SIDE WALLS
; \
J. NEILS LUMBER CO.
V
SHRINK COUNCIL'
APK1L NH
m
IA
Helena— (U J9 —Special trains of
nearly 100 cars have been ordered
for the Northwest Shrine Council
here April 26, according to E E
X
a
Enjoy
I ■ ■
FRIED OYSTERS — KIMBERLY STEAKS
and BREADED VEAL
Try Oùr 50c Lunch Can Specials
THE MONTANA CAFE
(Sis Green's)
We have an exclusive new method of repairing tires
using INFRA-RAYS—a Rubber Welding method that
does such a fine job that I want to tell you about it.
The Rubber Welding machine makes safe, permanent
tire repairs never before possible . . .
the WHOLE SECRET is TAPERED HEAT which
protects the tire area around the break while "weld
ing" the repair to the tire ; . . and MECHANICAL
PRESSURE which molds new rubber into a balanced .
strong, light repair. Let me show it to you the next
time you're around this way. •
0, K. RUBBER WELDERS
J
Bill and Carl Heise
Next Door to Libby Motors
Phone 234
SIGNS
I >
& y I
k
of all kinds
Interior and outside
painting.
I 1
Til
r
We will be glad to give
estimates on any paint
ing job . . .
Hf
t
*4
NO JOB TOO LARGE OR tfOÖ SMALL
PAL Paintet" LdCldire
*
General Contract Painting
LIBBY, MONTANA
PHONE 20-F-50
BRsworth, transportation
Hé said special trains
chairman
will conae
from Calgary, Missoula,, Portland,
Seattle, Spokane and Tacoma
Another will bring the Black
Horse Patrol from Hillings, he re
vealed. 8 •

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