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The Western news. [volume] (Libby, Mont.) 1933-current, January 29, 1948, Image 2

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WESTERN NEWS I
AND LIBBY TIMES
W. R. LITTELL,
Editor and Manager
Published every Thursday at Libby,
Mont, by Western Montana Pub
lishing Company, Inc.
I
Entered at the postoffice at Libby, j
Mont, as second-class matter.
--nitrm
OFFICIAL PAPER FOR LINCOLN
COUNTY _■
.$2.50
..... 1.50
i
WATIONAUDITOmAl—
inyf'lJW ASSOCIATION'
Subscription Rates:
One year _
Six months
Noise-Makers in a Typical Town of
5,066 Population
325 vacuum cleaners,
70 fountain drink mixers
65 electric drills
50 home mixers
30 stationary motors of various
kinds
15 hand sanders
25 washing machines
25 Neon and flashing signs
35 electric shavers
30 electric sewing machines
10 cash registers
9 electric refrigerators
5 violet ray machines
5 dentist's drills
2 X-Ray machines
1 garage sparkplug & coil tester
1 flatiron with automatic heat
control j
10 miscellaneous interferences.
The above noise-makers were
actually found in one town, and
indicates generally what may be
expected for each 5,000 population. f
Among the ten listed as miscel
laneous. are some unusual thing'
to be dealt with later. The term
"noise-makers" refers to appliances
actually found to be making objec
tionnl noise —the list does not in
elude appliances of similar types
found to bo reasonably noise-free.—
Mye Technical Manual.
-—
1
While Libby is slightly smaller
than the town above mentioned,
very similar electrical conditions
___ _
are possible. As a matter of fact,
Unofficial rumor has it that the
"city dads" may be planning to do
something about it. Regardless of
whether or not this is the case, all
home owners who liave radios, are
vitally interested in improving lo
cal i
the use of radios here is greatly
hampered by electrical interference,
Unofficial rumor has it that the
Regardless of whether or not
one's own radio is troubled with
intereference or even whether one
has a radio, whenever efforts are
being made to run down and elim
inate ^electrical interference in the
neighborhood, all should cooperate
by welcoming a check up of their
ov n electrical appliances. It's fool
ish lo blame our mountains for all
our radio difficulties!
CHRISTMAS CARD
ON A PINE BOARD
Last week a carload of lumber
was shipped from the J Neils Lum
ber Company of Libby, Montana to
the King Lumber Company at Cass
Lake. > •
In the bottom of the car a board
was found, this it what it said:
"Hello you guys at Cass Lake! from
two old timers, Fred Carlson and
Lud Hogan. Say hello to Jack
Downes."
Old timers will remember Fred
Carlson. He is an uncle of the
Lindquist boys of Cass Lake, and
his wife was Delma Roy of Cass
Lake. He worked for Neils for
years here and Went west with the
company. Lud Hogan lived at
Grace Lake, and at one time tended
bar for Tedford's Buffet.—Cass Lake
(Minn.) Times. __
Try Western News Classifieds.
They work while you sleep.
t
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lli
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■ -1
WHAT TIME IS IT?
Have you ever paged through an
old calendar, after it has outlived
its usefulness on the kitchen wall?
Or have you ever looked at a
calendar still hanging in the base
ment, say, from 1944 or 1945? Sort
of useless, isn't it?
No, not quite! There's a sermon
in old calendars. They remind us
of the constant and relentless flight
of time. We're a lot closer to the
end than we were back in '44—
more than a thousand days closer!
God warns us: "It is appointed
unto men once to die, but after
this the judgment." Some day there
will be a calendar the final pages of
which will have to be torn off by
those whom we will leave behind.
We will be prepared for that day
only if we have made our
with God through a persona
living faith in Jesus Christ, the
world's only Savior. The time is
growing shorter every day. Are
YOU prepared to meet your God?
We invite you to let us help ydö
in your preparation through our
Christian ministry. — ST- JOHN
LUTHERAN CHURCH.
peace
1 and
a Futher Analysis
lOf Present-Day
Difficulties
By Charles D Rowe
Last week this column was de-
voted almost entirely to quotations
f rom the address delivered by Win
Wevrierrever of Fortine Master
S"thl[ Moïtona State Grange, be
tore the state convention of the
Grange, held in Bozeman December
3-6 His address was a thoughtful
analysis of the causes back of many
of our present troubles. One of
which is a "retreat from our re
sponsibilities" as citizens, said Mr.jof
Wcydemever. This week we again
devote this column to further
cerpts from the same able address,
We quote as follows:
E fleets of Taxation
In a free Society, such as the
framers of the Constitution sought
to establish in America, the only ac
ceptable purpose of taxes is to pro-1
'vide the revenue needed by
collectively to protect themselves
from economic or physical aggres
|sion and to provide for desirable.
social, economic, or cultural advan
otherwise obtainable. All
Staxpayers is subject to constant re-,
[view and check by the citizens
[themselves, centralized taxation is
likely to become an instrument of
power in the hands of politicans
jand to escape from effective check
by the citizens themselves. When
[expenditures of the central govern
ment become too great, the result
ing economic ill effects of the neces-1
sary tax load of accumulating pub
lie debts may nullify the supposed
social and economic benefits pro-1
vided by these expenditures. The j
employment of labor and risk of
capital in business and industry are (
discouraged. Production of new J
wealth is curtailed. Purchasing i
power of the public is reduced. !
Heavy tax demand on the income ]
of citizens leaves a smaller per-[
[centage available for social services i
tages not
[History has demonstrated, however,
that while collection of taxes on a
local level, with the consent of the
at the state and county level, which j
in turn increases the demand for
federal aid of many kinds. "
_ Private
support of independent churches,
■^■■a^ÉjH^MHÉiÉMpurselves
mands for increased federal aid j
serve to accelerate a vicious circle
which gradually destroys the ca
pacity and the will of the people
to provide more directly for their
own needs, and which eventually
-
chanties, and educational institu
tions is lessened. Continued de
mands for
I
at
Mr
U
3
iu ?
n
NOW IS THE TIME...
To re-check and re-service your wheels and
tires and put them in tip-top shape for snow
and icy weather driving.
i
I
Standard Motors
MARCH OF DIMES
DANCE
Saturday, January 31st
I
AT
LINCOLN'S GOPHER INN
5-piece Orchestra With Vocalist
THE STAR DUSTERS
OF MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY
Dancing From 10 'til 2
Sponsored by
LIBBY LIONS CLUB
All proceeds go to the National
Foundation for Infantile Paralysis
ADMISSION: $1.00 Per Couple, Including Tax
THE WESTERN NEWS,
I leads to national socialism or dic
j tatorship.
Taxation is only one of the fields,
but a very important one, in which
we can fight the doctrines of Com
i munism by accepting personal and
! local responsibility for providing
i ourselves with the services for
j which taxes are imposed.
Moral Basis for Freedom
j Our Constitution, our
Rights, and our American way or
! life all are based upon the funda
mental moral principle that all men
are born free and arc entitled to
equal human rights I his pnn
ciple makes it clear than any gov
eminent should be established and
, should exist only to serve the needs
its citizens, and should at all
1 times be the servant rather than
ex-,the master of the people Most of
us have not fully realized that this
[moral principle imposes an obli
[galion upon the members of a gov
! erned Society to maintain perpetual
vigilance against the forces of pow
; er and control which at all times
threaten to make goveinment a
citizens|weapon of the minority rather than
a means of self regulation and self
; service by Society as a whole. In
1 the name of Public Welfare we have
already granted to a central gov
eminent powers and responsibilities
which should have been reserved
Bill of
{ statism.
Despite the changed conditions of
an atomic age and a shrinking
world, these moral principles of
freedom and equality are still
sound and are the only principles
which can lead to lasting peace and
the brotherhood of man. If in the
present Two World idealogical war
fare we are to lead the world to an
acceptance of these principles, we
must first establish them in our
own land. The responsibility for
this task rests primarily upon you
and me, upon the Grange and other
grass-roots organizations. For it is
a task which must begin in the
home and be extended through our
schools and churches and other
community services. If we are to
maintain a healthy free Society, we
ourselves and our
. _ _ D
to local and state governments. By
this retreat from our responsibility
have aided the advance of
we
must prepare
children for accepting the duties
and responsibilities of members of
a free Society, we must prepare
in stable
divorce courts; around the family
table, not around the gambling
table; in the Grange Hall, not the
roadhouse; in the local church, not;
the town tavern; in the local school,
not the city alleys.
If every American community
carefully a crop of moral
nurtures
responsibility and good citizenship,
our who! nation will be safe from
the weeds of Communism.
Inflation
Despite the conflicting charges of
resuonsibility for inflation, it is safe
to sav that a widespread rise in
Driers* establishes the fact that our,
monev isn't worth as much as it '
used to be. And it isn't worth as |
much because in relation to goods,
for which we wish to exchange it, I
the supply is too plentiful. Since j
1939 our supply of currency has in- j
creased 300 percent. Production :
has increased only 60 percent. The
natural result in a competitive mar- ;
ket has been cheap money or an |
increase in prices. !
This increase in currency did not !
happen without cause. The change.
began when Congress retreated from
its Constitutional duty of regulating
the issuance and value of money (
and granted power to the Presi- I
dent to control foreign exchange, in- ■
vest oublie funds in private bank
stock, confiscate all gold, issue 3,
billion dollars of fiat money, re
pudiate the gold redemption clause
in all government obligations, and !
fix the value of the dollar at 59
percent of its former gold content, t
During the depression years and
the World, War, the government
chose to finance its programs large- 1
ly by borowing rather than by the
levying of heavy taxes. A large j
share of the borrowing was donei
from banks, which process increased
the amount of pocketbook and
checkbook money in circulation from
36 billions in June of 1939 to 110.2
billion in April this year. The effect
of this increased supply has been
partly offset by an increase in pro
duction of goods and services, so
that instead of being worth one
third as much in 1939, our dollar
_
I ..... ...
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j *

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FOR
V
*
*
*
Competent and
Sound Insurance
Protection
*
*
»
*
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»
*
<■
*
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Always See, Phone or Call
, *
| ♦
]
| J
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TED KESSEL
*

509 Mineval Ave - Phone 196W *
"All Forms of Insurance"
»
*
DICKINSON'S
"The Music Center"
134 1st Avenue W.
Kalispeli, Mont.
'1 '
o ^
• !
Ml
«V
«I 11
*1«
J
oo*
HO**
o'°
» »
■a
'SSS
VEGETABLE SOUP
CAMPBELL—2 FOR
CHICKEN-NOODLE SOUP
CAMPBELL—2 FOR
CRACKERS
SNOWFLAKE— 2 LBS.
CRACKERS
KRISPY—2 POUNDS
PYEQUICK
12 OUNCE
CAKE FLOUR
SWANSDOWN—2V, LBS.
CAKE FLOUR
R & W—2?4 POUNDS
CUT BEANS
R & W—2s .
GARDEN PEAS
R & W—303s*—2 FOR
GOLDEN CREAM CORN
R & W—2s—2 FOR
EE CREAM OF WHEAT
= 28 OUNCE
H MOTHER S OATS
= LARGE
H WHEATHEARTS
28 OUNCE
= ZOOM
EE 16 OUNCE
n COFFEE
|= R & W—POUND
H COFFEE
R & W—2 POUNDS
ÜÊ TOMATO JUICE
YAKIMA FARMER—46-OZ ....
HI MAYONNAISE
R & W—PINTS
= SALAD DRESSING
SÜNSPÜN— PINTS .
♦ 29c
25c
31c
46c
49c
28c
49c
22c
42c
50c
39c
97c
35c J
25c I
23c
45c
35c I
35c
43c I
Chocolate Flavored Syrup.... 5c
Sifers-Closeout Special-20-oz.
Kootenai Mercantile Company
Grocery Department
MmiiiiiiiiiiniiinminniHmiiitiiniiiHHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin»iiiiiiiiiintnmmimitmiiiiii iii iiii it ii iiiniminii ii t )| Hlftm ^
today has about half its previous
value.
It thus becomes apparent that
lower living costs will result only
by.. lessening the gap between in
creased currency and increased
This can be accomplished
goods. oo ;
not by denunciation of busmes. ,
men or gram exchanges or policical ;
opponents, by increased wages and j
shorter hours, but by greater pro
duction per wage or cost unit,
Food Prices
Food producers of the nation are
currently being flamed for the high
cost of food on the American mar
kel. It is difficult to see why far
niers, selling in an open market
are to blame f'>r supply-demand
relationships resulting from the fact
that Americans are eating twelve
percent more food per capita than
before the war, and that we are
trying to supply food for ail the
hungry world. In contrast with the
restrictive practices of Industry and
Labor, Agriculture 1 as vastly in
creased production of food pro
III
i;t I!
III
i
li
mm
%
I
We Can Give You a Cozy Bedroom
Exchange for Your Attic
in
Have you ever thought of turning
that useless attic into a spare bed
room for one of the kids or an over
night guest? We're prepared to fur
nish you with superior materials
right now!
A GOOD STOCK OF
WALLBOARD ON HAND
J. NEILS LUMBER CO.
ducts in spite of many handicaps.
(Continued from Page Two)
■ Sand
and Gravel
State Tested
Excavating & ditch dig
ging of all kinds.
PROMPT SERVICE
hagerty &
BLACKWELL
Phone 173-J or 72-W

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