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The Western news. [volume] (Libby, Mont.) 1933-current, January 29, 1948, Image 9

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82006551/1948-01-29/ed-1/seq-9/

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ANNUAL REPORT SUPERVISORS
TOBACCO VALLEY SOIL
CONSERVATION DISTRICT
supervisors of the Tobacco Valiev
Soil Conservation District is nre
pared to^funri°h coooerators and
landowners of the dürfet coonera
iir^cr Jo „ A , ? oopera '
mritee with a Üïv
of the iuf 0V !î 168
dLest n? ft. ntL 9 H a "V
digest if ^f^ure-plani and needs,
T u.. m iLin?! . îr if e 1
rnfKPrv.tfmn « ba . CCO ' a ey Soi j
on W M District W3S organized
14 ; 194 £ Wlth ai ?„ area of
. acres. During 194/ a pro
gram was earned out to extend
the district to include the rest of
LincoJn County A referendum was
held on June 14 and the inclusion
was approved by the state com
mitee on August 19 1947 At the
same time the Flathead district
was expanding its area and 158,752
acres in the southeast part of Lin
coin County were included with
the Flathead district so all of Lin
coin County is now in a district.
After the district was expanded
to include the remainder of the
county, an election of supervisors
was held to elect a supervisor to
replace Alfred Peltier whose term
expired. Lloyd Maize of Libby was
elected and he will represent the
western part of the district.
Educational Program
The fourth annual report of the
The educational program during
the year included community meet
mgs. a fair exhibit, an essay con
test, newspaper articles, talks at
«te high school and cooperation
at the 4-H Grange camps.
Community meetings were sched
uled for Eureka, Rexford and Trego
during the month of April. Movies,
slides and talks by Soil Conserva
tion Service personnel were in
eluded in the program.
A fair exhibit was erecied for the
Eureka fair on September 6.
An essay contest was scheduled
in cooperation with the Montana As
sociation of Soil Conservation Dis
trict Supervisors and prize money
for best essays in the high school
and in the grade schools was do
nated by the Pomona Grange.
Several programs on soil conser
vation were given at the high school
by the Work Unit Conservationist
and the District Conservationist of
the Soil Conservation Service.
A member of the Soil Conserva
tion Service was included on the
stall of the 4-H camp attended by
-j-H members from Lincoln County
ar,d a member of the supervisors of
'he district was included or. the
staff of the State Grange camp held
at Flathead Lak,e. Soil conserva
tion was included in both of these
camps.
Cooperation from "The Western
News" in publishing soil conserva
tion news items was very good and
approximately 30 news items were
published.
A series of meetings on soil con
servation were held in. Libby and
Troy, area with the Granges. Slides
and a movie, "Under Western
Skies," were shown.
New or Unusual Procedures
No new or unusual practices weie
carried out during the year. There
was a great deal of request for
equipment early in the spring. The
interest lagged during the summer
and early fall; however, late in f e
fall, there again was a great de
mand for the u:v of equipment in
land clearing and it is assume i that
this interest will carry over for
the early 1948 season.
Accomplishments
The expansion ol thc district was
carried out to include the remainder
of Lincoln County. The iollowmg
amounts of seed were received from
the Soil Conservation Service nur
sery: crested wheatgrass, 500 ibs.;
slender wheatgrass, 500 lbs., and
intermediate wheatgrass. JO lb,':.
The district received a grant of
a disc, a drill and a two-way plow
from the Soil Conservation Ser
vice.
establishment of a horse herd law i
in the Eureka area and a sufficient ]
number of signers have beer, ob
JUST
*
,
Phone
•A.
A:
185
*....
V
FOR
FUEL OIL
The cleanest, most convenient Fuel is Oil.
. . . You can derive the most heat for your
money. Deliveries are prompt. CALL US.
E. L KEMP
Prjgress is being made on
j taintd- The petitions are bei..;-, sub
Imitted to the county commissioners
for action.
.u M ° St of , the ,ß oals established
. the n annual work Plan for 1947 were
j , attained. Supervisors attemp
d t0 secur ?. applications from land
owners in the district who had not
made ^Plication. The series
community meeting were held dur
inK April - some of which were very
well attended and others had very
poor attendance. The demonstra
tions on lancl clearing and post treat
mg were not held. News items were
prepared by the Extension Service
and the Soil Conservation Service
and were published in ' The West
ern News" The goal of one per
week was not quit! reached, Ta?ks
were given to the hieh school in
Eureka and soil conservation was'
includedmthe S S
held at Bitterroot Lake. Education
was also carried out among the
civic clubs and Granges in the west
ern part of the county in connection
with the expansion of the district
to include the remainder of Lincoln
County. The goal of 30 farm plans
was riot reached: however, nearly
all of the applications which were
available from the old district were
serviced. The emphasis on farm
plans in the future will be in the
new part of the district. We were
unable to secure assistance in de
tine Creek Irrigation Project. It
is hoped that this service can bei
obtained during the coming year.
Meetings of the supervisors were
held regularly. Attendance by all
of the supervisors should be the
goal for next year.
Suggestions to Assisting Agencies
The District recommends that:
1. The Soil Conservation Service
and the Extension Service encour
age field fertilizer trials instead ofi
small field plots; that is, field
trials to consist of the application
of fertilizer on one-half of a field
of either grain or hay, leaving the
remainder unfertilized so that com-1
parative data may be obtained,
2 All agencies cooperate in get
ting the branch experiment station
located in western Montana.
3. The Soil Canservation Service
and the Extension Service cooperate
to continue and expand the educa-;
tional program and to carry out
youth groups,
4. In view of the increased in
terest in Christmas tree manage
ment and marketing and the ex
Jß&M
a more intensive program with
OUR
TIRES
have a
15 Month
Written
GUARANTEE
against everything but
Running Flat or
Collisions.
i
Pat's
Carter
Service
pansion of the district in western
Montana in which a great deal
woodland management «'ill be
needed, the Soil Conservation Ser
in vice retain the services of a farm
forestry specialist.
5. All agencies assist in «tab
lishmg a horse herd law in the
Eureka area.
of 6. All agencies cooperate to help
carry out the soil conservation
gram in Lincoln county.
7. The Soil Conservation Service
cooperate in conducting an intensive
studv to determine the feasibility
of the proposed Fortine Creek Ir
rigation Project.
0 ... ■ , ■ . ,j v
8. All agencies cooperate m study
inp the Christmas tree blight situa
develop,n S methods for
lts control.
9 ' The %veed control program
caSi^. j? t ' ncOUraged and
continued in 1948.
Conclusions ^
There is a great need for informa
tion on the kind and amounts of
I fertilizer which should ( be applied:
I cn various soil types in this dis
! trict Field trials in the past have
(been on a small plot basis and
*hose should be increased to in
elude an entire field, fertilizing one-.
hal * of the field and using the
other half as a check plot. It is
hoped that when the experiment
station is established in western
Montana additional assistance can
be obtained in fertilizer research
wor k in the area,
! More information is needed on,
| new and improved varieties which
! are adaptable to northwestern Mon
i tana. These are needed both for
I crop varieties and grass varieties,
i Much work needs to be done on ;
i proper range conservation in the
j TobaccoValley. The first thing nec-1
es ?ary is a horse herd law which
w '" prevent the grazing of grass
during the winter months. Horses I
congregate in the valley during the
I
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1
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Grocery Store
Groceries
Gasoline - Oil
Phone 20F1-4
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
PUT LOWERED PRICES
AHEAD OF OTHER THINGS
General Electric lowered prices because we wanted to
do our part to stop the present spiral of inflation.
General Electric lowered prices on electrical*appli
ances in greatest demand—because that is where low
ered prices on General Electric products will do the
most good and have the greatest effect.
General Electric lowered prices regardless of the fact
that G-E profits are not high—are not at present levels
high enough.
We did this because we know that in the long run
General Electric can prosper only as the people of this
country prosper. We believe that producing more goods
for more people at less coat is the soundest way of running
a business. And we feel that inflation in this country has
reaqhed a dangerous level—for the wage earner, for the
man with savings, and for industry alike.
Do jpo n know what inflation can do to yon?
As money buys less and leas, your savings lose their
buying power. Life insurance policies dwindle in value.
Money saved to take your wife to the hospital won't pay
the bill when the t ime comes. Pay checks buy less and
leas. Retirement money won't pay for retirement.
This applies to the man who brings home a weekly
pay check, to the man with a little* savings in the bank
or a life insurance policy, and to companies that have
to build new plants and buy new machines to fill future
needs and provide future jobs.
Inflation is a sinister thing. It steals up on a country
and its economy in a gradually accelerating two-step
of prices and wages—each trying to get one step ahead
of the other—and there is no red line to show when the
danger point has been reached.
Inflation is like a fire. Once it gets well under way, it
can never be checked until everything is destroyed.
I
Self-restraint by industries and indmdMis
the best check
You as an individual can do most by buying less and
saving more—thus avoiding bidding up the prices for
scarce goods. Business and industry can do much by
lowering prices whenever and wherever possible—
voluntarily.
General Electric put lowered prices ahead of other
things because we believe it is a step towards licking
inflation.
•ri
.
We Must Destroy Inflation or It Will Destroy Us
ELECTRIC
GENERAL
m
winter and feed ».
aas been left from summer grazing
This is the fir<t step to be taken
j range improvement in the
There is a need for reseeding
.^ges and retiring low class agn
cultural land to pastures. There
also a need fur development of u
r ««ated
The e
pro-,oontima
j^ms .
tc be , s
:a the m-w
own

■ ^
on any grass that
area.
onal program must be
and
pastures.
1 m the old area to assist
completing the practices
iblished on their farms
area to educate the land
o the benefits to be de
n the district program
uld take a moi
rt in the educational pro
. ( the district;
iS t
r;\
Sum
activ
y
at 1
on I
present at each
meeting held with the
jianizatkms in the cour
Co
va: :
■We put ir. «1
Statg Sec. Marshall on Ger
man situation.
the Rusisans take
! out
Guaranteed
Radio Repairing
• Tubes
• Batteries
• Tube checking
Telescoping House
Aerials.
• Phonograph
Records & Albums
• Needles
Radios &
Radio-Phonographs
Bakers Radio
Service
ON HONOR ROLL
in'
"n and Marjory A. Hunter, both of
Libby: Ronald J Rice and Lido J
Vizzutti, Eureka, and William R.
Dolan. Troy, were among the 262
LINCOLN CO. STUDENTS
Misosula—Darrel R (Bill' Mar
, , . .a
students who earned place's on the
''ill quarter honor roll at the State
University. The honor roll in
cluded 140 veterans and 30 students
with straight "A" grades.
Martin, a navy veteran, is a jun
r in physical education and a 1942
äduate of Libby high school, and
iss Hunter. 1946 Libby graduate,
a sophomore in journalism. Ron
i
i
!■
M
-ml J. Rice was graduated from Lin
c In «. ounty high school in 1938,
obtained a university degree in
geology, served in the Marine corps
and is now taking advanced work
m journalism, and Vizzutti 1941
. . ~ ,
LincoJn County graduate, is an army
veteran and a freshman in liberal
Cold Weather Check-Ups
Preserve your Prestone and Permanent
Anti-Freeze by:
HAVING THE FOLLOWING CHECKED . . .
• HOSES
HEATER
BATTERY
• RADIATOR
• WATER PUMP
Good Motors Demand This Service
LIBBY
srMßTORS
52
Do«
ART BROCK
Across From Kootenai Theatre
PAGE KINK
TRUCKS COLLIDE
Dolan, who was graduated in
arts.
1946 from Troy high school, is a
sophomore in the school of phar
macy.
Considerable damage was done to
truck driven by Walter Johnson
when he collided with a loaded log
interesting,
ging truck driven by Seeley Bache,
Thursday of last week.
Pictures taken at the scene of
the collision about 25 miles south,
of Libby on Highway No. 2 were
MAKES HONOR ROLL
Raymond C Brace who is *.
sophomore at the Montana Stale
Normal College, Dillon, was amoac
the students who earned a place
on the autumn quarter honor roll,
The honor roll is comprised of the
, 10 P cr ccnt of students making the
highest scholastic rating during any
quarter , Mr . Bracy Ls thc son
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph O. Bracy, Troy.

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