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The Western news. [volume] (Libby, Mont.) 1933-current, July 08, 1948, Image 4

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The Weed
Was Dying
By
John Christopher
J OE COLIN looked at the blonde
J behind the counter as if he j
hadn't seen her for the last 21 years. |
And he hadn't. Almost to the day. i
come October 5.
Even after 21 1
years a guy can't forget the birth i
date of his daughter.
She looked the spitting reflection
of her mother, years back when
Martha and Joe had decided they
had made a mistake in marrying
"I each other.
• Minuit was too late then j
. because the kid
r IST (Oil was on its way,
and even Joe
knew it took a father and a mother
to give it the correct backing. But
If the old man hadn't had the same
correct backing, Joe had decided,
he was like a weed. He had to be
pulled out, to let the good seed
grow.
Joe had figured he was a weed,
and had pulled himself out.
It
3

" Evening, mister.' Can l help you?" Jot
looked up. A lump settled in his throat
His daughter was smiling at him with
stars i» her eyes.
Twenty-two years old! When he
had last seen her, she was a mere
trick of one, a curly-haired kid,
learning her first steps. Carrie, they
had named her. After nobody in
particular. Martha had just liked
___ «h *ui~e*
m 3 hi,
though. Wonder if Martha had done
something with Cohn .
"I used to live here years ago,"
Joe said, to start conversation.
"You did?" Her blue eyes met
his for a moment of sparkling in
terest. "Thought you'd come back
and see how things have changed'"
"Well, sort of." He stroked the
beard. "I used to know a lot of
people around here. What's your
name? I might know your old
man."
"Name's Lester," she told him,
"Carrie Lester."
L ester.
"Colin.
So Martha had ditched
"Lester," Joe mused.
"Heck, I knew your old man! What's
he doing now?"
"I don't know," she said. "Mother
thinks he's out in California."
"How about you?" he asked final
ly. "Got a husband—or maybe a
boy friend?"
Her face gave off warmth like
sunshine. "A boy friend," she said
brightly. "But it won't be 1cm* be
fore the 'Mr. and Mrs.' If you're
here in another 15 minutes, you'll
see him. He's coming after me."
»»
grinned. "I'll be here," he
said.
She brought in his meal. He just
finished it when the door opened
and a tall, young man in a brown
tweed suit swept into the room like
a stray, autumn leaf.
Her eyes brightened but politely
she asked Joe his name, and intro
duced him. The boy, she said, was
Harry Bradshaw.
"Years ago," she explained, "Mr.
Colin used to live here. We got
|
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m
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m
.
9
afy
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Suddenly Joe knew that the weed
was dying.
sort of acuqainted while he waited
for his food."
"So you kids are slated for the
long walk up the altar, eh?" Joe
remarked. .
'X'HE Bradford kid's face split in
a long smile.
"Look," Joe said, matter of fact
ly, "I got a few green-backs saved
up. I'd like tO ( give it to you two
for a wedding 'present. Two hun
dred dollars. Maybe you'd like to
buy something for the baby—when
it comes. Huh?"
"No thanks," Harry said. "We
certainly appreciate it, but we both
work. It wouldn't be right."
Joe drew out a checkbook. He
grinned good-naturedly. "I'll draw
up a check, anyway."
The two youngsters looked bewil
dered.
Go on," urged Joe. "Take it.
It's good. Don't worry about me."

She took it. "You — you're wonderful,"
the whispered, "And I can't understand
why. Thanks — a lot."
Joe smiled and walked out,
breathing in the cool, night air.
Funny thing, but now he realized
that something had changed in the
weed. And suddenly Joe knew that
after years of battling harsh winds,
snow, cold, and rain, the weed was
dying.
And Joe was the weed.
Belt at <d by WSV Feature«
THE WESTERN NEWS,
A SHORTAGE OF BUiLDIKô MATERIAL!
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THE KOOTENIA DAM
(Continued from Page One)
posed project leaves them in doubt
as feasibility of such a plan,
Af t er muc h d.scuss.on by the
iLn MvS
the J. Neils counsel and John Myers
of the Zonolite company on the rc
location of the Great Northern rail
road and the added expense in
I volved and uncertainty of the gov
ernment "shouldering" the re-estab
lishment of this route of transporta
tion. the Colonel advised that ac
cording to tentative plans. Libby
would not have to worry about be
rne left without railway transpor
tation.
The loss of taxable pronerties was
explained by the engineer who
stated the go%'ernment will assume
what lost taxes there would be un
til future industry created by the
dam would again build up that in
come.
Former Lincoln Countv Att'y
Thomas Long made several nointed
remarks, not necessarily endorsing
or opoosing the plan. He expressed
the opinion that much of the argu
ments had taken on the appear
ance of "red Herring" and that Lib
byites must helo to make their own
future and not necessarily depend
on one man or one power to pull
them through to a bright future. He
following its loss of the main line
of the Great Northern some years
ago and how that citv demonstrated
that if peoole have the courage they
can overcome what might seem in
surmountable obstacles, and that
potential possibilities of the dam
should be considered.
During discussion Colonel Hew
itt exnlainod that a reoort of the
meeting will be sent to Washing
ton D. C. engineers, who will studv
the feasibility of both phvsical and
economic aspects, as well as the
opinion of the public. Further
opinions, favoring or in opposition
to the oroiect will be received bv
the U. S. Enginners Corps and care
fully co-ordinated with what data
has already been collected for fi
nal decisions.
MILLION DOLLAR BUILDING
(Continued from Page One)
recently completed by The J. Neils
Lumber Company down town on
Maine. Other remodeling also in
cludes apartments being made from
the Gale Weidner garage at 502
Montana Avenue.
Included in new business build
ings are the recenthl completed
Electric Store on- Third and Cali
fornia belonging to Ray Pival, the
new Dome Theatre, now open and
nearing completion, Tinker's Drive
In Cafe. The Suroise. the new build
ing south of The Dome Theatre,
being built by Mr. and Mrs. Rich
ard Brinton, and the building which
is being completed bv Mr. and Mrs.
Geringer on Mineral Avenue be
tween Fourth and Fifth. This fine
building now houses the staff of the
Kootenai Forest in spacious quar
ters on the second floor, and when
completed will be the new home
of the Geringer Hardware. A num
ber of other houses and business
buildings have been completed dur
ing the past 18 months.
Manv of the new buildings have
beautiful scenic outlooks, with sev
eral rare opportunities for instal
ling special "window framed"
views of mountain grandness.
Helena — (U.R) — The monetary
value of the State of Montana is in
creasing, according to State Auditor
John J. Holmes.
Net balance in all State funds on
June 1 was $49,355,583, compared
with $35,330,060 a year ago, he said.
TURNING AROUND
»
,
I 2
3
I
I
-,
Stops arc nusibered
and line shows path
of front of car.
ft
WRITES OF KOOTENAI
FLOOD IN 1894
(Continued from Page One)
ambara River to Santa Domingo
gold mine at 3000 feet.
Tljere a fine camp was establish
ed. native miners had good living
quarters, and there was gold,
enough for everybody. "Swiftwatèr
Bill" (whom Woods had known in
Alaska) offered $1,000,000 for the
property which was refused, and
$3,000.000 was taken out in two
years.
However, Clarence /and Swift
water made a trip down the river
in August, during low water, into
the Indian country, where natives
traded fish for tin cans.' The pic
tures indicated they w r ere a friend
ly people and longed for the good
things of life. Well, reader, if a
gourd were your best possession,
how would you like to have a tin
can?
Winter rains raise the Inambara
about 50 feet and each year that
swirling torrent brings down more
gold, leaving much of it above the
low water mark. That has been the
main source of Inca gold for genera
tions. Woods believes that 50 miles
of the river could be successfully
dredged.
Capital, transportation and thous
e needs, as
ands of young men
Woods sees it, for tha" 1 modem de
velopment qf that great land, where
his son is carrying oii operations.
Aircraft should play a dominant
part in the new look soon to be
given our neighbors to the south.
The Incas built roads connecting
Cuzco with Quito, 2000 miles — a
distance comparable to that from
El Paso to Portland, Ore.—one
mountain and the other along the I
ocean; also temples, observatories |
and huge forts with 800-ton stones I
placed in their walls. How were
they moved into position? Don't
ask me and don't ask construction
engineers. They don't know either.
T. L. M'CULLOUGH.
Riverside.
THREE MONTANA QUINTS
CELEBRATE FIRST BIRTHDAY
Baker — (U.R) — Delores. Dorothy
and Dean Randash—the three sur
of the Randash quintuplets
vivors
born a year ago in a Miles City hos
pital, recently celebrated their first
birthday.
AUTOMOTIVE
REPAIR WORK OF
ALL KINDS
GUARANTEED
Our Equipment Is
ALL NEW
GIVE US A TRIAL
Coleman Auto Repair
1420 Minnesota Ave.
on Ü. S. Highway No. 2
î t
Scott Atwoter
Speeds of from
1 to 20 Miles
PER HOUR
7H H. P.
. . . The ideal all 'round
motor.
—We Trade—
Standard Motors
LIBBY, MONTANA
LIBBY. MONTANA
RANKIN FAVORS
ROAD EQUALITY AND
BETTER ROADS
j
1
j
■n, ... . ^ ...._I
1
is discriminated against by the
g0Vernment v,hen Jt comes
,,™ as , ... n „„„
J ,^LnntJn a « Sf«:
a f fcèn/ Ifn H alff
a percentage ° f Federal funds as the
8 eS 1 neigh '
"wfL S cifni'.M Mnntana
nn)^S 7 rJr an!) Npvarfa M ür
cpn¥ 5 f rn!t n, N pnn«tr,!nti^.
Utah 7 -î n.r rent AriaoM Tl ânH
Idahn  P rZ rent' If Nevada nnt=
un S? on 2 M 55 N in Federal
L g ^n! 4 n..tc vn ft no >
VederaV^nnev 3t
g %°T nl rm SI ± 3 e e n d F ^ er t a L m0 Eed
1 i oht fnr
te^ ^fnfiee ^ Lad mnnev s'
matidf nt.« ag f v f ill ftvhf^tn aef
maîivÆ' in
?* n ^ d °l la Z n.,T .m y a !
ctata h offc uf rn/pr™™/ a
?
lh, formula I s.y. Vat Monûôa
wLSÏadÂ-y"' Ali " na '
y mg an
I
I
STATE RAISES 42.1%
SECURITY BONDS
Security Loan Bond sales in Mon
tana so far reported total $5,998,000 j
or 42.1 per cent of the state quota, |
Arthur Nelson, state director for
Montana's U. S. Savings bonds di- j
vision, has reported.
Eight counties have now attained j
60 per cent or better of E Bond
quotas, while seven counties have
exceeded 60 per cent of total quotas,
!
STRYKER
Glen Berg, daughter Geneva and
son Gene, from Renton. Wash., are
visiting relatives and friends here
at present.
Mr. and Mrs. Orville Thompson
from Kalispell and Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Roedel celebrated their
double wedding anniversary Sun- 1
dav June 27 at the home of the '
latter here . Other guests from Kal
ispell were Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Case and children.
George Allen Jr., operator at the
depot in Valcour, and Mike Len
non from Eureka were fishing in
Bull Lake Tuesday evening and just
another case of bad luck, "No fish!"
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wilson were
brief callers in Eureka Tuesday
morning.
Mrs. Wilfred Deseve from Eureka
and daughter Helen from Spokane
stopped on their way Monday from
shopping in Kalispell and visited
with old neighbors and friends, Mr.
and Mrs. Shaw. Helen was a grad
uate in the class of '45 from the
Lincoln County High School in Eur
eka, finished her schooling in Spo
kane and at present has a position
as secretary. Her many friends sin
cerely wish her continued success
in her chosen work.
Roy and Clarence Swanson from
Trego were last weekend guests at
the .Thopias White home.
Ml 1 , and Mrs. Charley Ellis have I
ÏAVE HERE ON CM YOUR FOOl> HEED(""Aj^.
.1 f
gu
».
&
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
JULY 9TH AND 10TH
r
Grapefruit and Orange
SECTIONS - Old South .. No. 2
25c
./
»I»
u

I
PRUNE PLUMS
15c
r—
Choice—Red Spot
Tin
0 /*
TOMATO SOUP
29c
Heinz
3 for
SUNSHINE CRACKERS
2 Pounds .
49c
CHEESE
Pen Jell PECTIN
2 For ..
BISQUICK
1.10
23c
Tasty Loaf
2 Pounds
CLEANSER
Old Dutch .
29c
45c
3 for
Package
s
s
BOLYARD'S BETTER MEATS
I
t
I
Boston Butts
Carstens .
Luncheon Loaves
Armours Star
Birds Eye Frozen Foods
Frankfurters
Armours Star
Polish Sousoge
Armours .
- Pies - Ice Cream
61c
55c
Pound
Pound
55c
45c
Pound
Pound
BOLYARD'S GROCERY AND MARKET
■■ 1 »
Phone 105
Free
Delivery
It Pays
To
Compare
n
ST
U*]»
FINCH QLALIT'T AT LOUtH PR1CLS IROM COAST TO C O A S I
I
purchased a cabin in Warland closer
to their work and will move there
in the near future.
Patsy Berg from Devon is visiting
her aunt . Mrs. Thomas White, and
f am j] y this week.
Mr. and Mrs. Bud Nordtome are
the proud parents of a baby daugh
ter *><>rn July 2 at the Kalispell
General hospital. The baby's name
is Doris Ann
Mr. and Mrs. Don Baer and daugh
ter Bett Y Jo from Helena and Mr.
and Mrs - Kenn Y Toble from Ogden,
Utah, were ovcr-theFourth guests
at °- K - Iversons.
The county grader did excellent
work on the road Thursday. Many
thanks.
Mr - and Mrs - William Kirby from
Seattle are visiting Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Wilson and renewing old ac
Quaintance with Mr. and Mrs. Shaw.
Mr - and Mrs - Charley Ellis are
moving to Warland this week and
Mr. and Mrs. Art Martin will move
in the Ellis house later.
Grandma Calvert from Great
" d a/Ä , Jr r ' e0and ^ ^
Mr. an( j Mrs Lawrence Berg and
children from Devon enjoyed the
Fourth with relatives and friends
here and at Eureka.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Case and
Mr. and Mrs. Orville
children,
Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey
{Roedel, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Thomp
son and children and Mr. and Mrs.
ispell, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Roedel
and son and Mr. and Mrs. Billie
Roedel from Great Falls, Leslie Till
man and girl friend and Leslie's
brother Jackie from Columbia Falls
were guests at the Harry Roedel
home over the Föurth.
Art Webster and children from Kal
Rail Quiz
LUU
u i j u u i j u u
When were United States mails
first carried by rail?
First known instance was in 1831,
westward from Charleston, S. D., fol
lowed in 1832 by such transportation
between Baltimore and Frederick,
Md
Y
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•*
PIANOS
DICKINSON'S
55
The Music Center
134 1st Ave. W. • Kalispell
* 4 . .
Thursday, July 8, 1948
[ Friday evening
| car. They wil
friends in Minnesota, Wisconsin and
Mooseheart, Ill., on their way to
meet their son Raymond, his wife
and baby, who left Regnesburg.
Germany, July 6. and will arrive in
Hamilton. New York. July 15.
Hene Teske accompanied Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Carlson as far as Lari
more, N. D., where she will visit
relatives.
Carl A. Johnson of Culver City,
Calif., has been here visiting his
sister. Mrs. J. Starry, leaving Wed
nesday. July 7.
Circle A will meet in the church
parlors for a potluck picnic and
social hour Friday, July 16, at 2:30
P- m. All members please come.—
Ruth Austin, Acting Secretary,
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Kimpel of
Hingham, came Wednesday of last
week to visit till Monday at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Mit
chell. The Kimpels are Mrs. Mit
chell's parents.
Ti Ar i hUr E ' TST
^ thTÆÂfr dÄ
ter, Mrs. Robt. Lyon, in Seattle.
Mr and Mrs George F. Chris
tensen of Spokane are visiting at
the home
mother, Mrs. Rosella Burke.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Carlson left
for a trip east by
1 visit relatives and
of Mrs. Christensen's
Miss Elsie Elgas, assistant photo
grapher at the Parker Studio, moved
Libby this week from Big Tim
to
ber.
If you say it with . . .
FLOWERS
prove it with , . .
DIAMONDS
%
We have a very pleasant
surprise for you!
Watch for our advertis
ing every week to fol
low.
BUCKINGHAM
Jewelry Store
The store of better diamonds.

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