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The Western news. [volume] (Libby, Mont.) 1933-current, September 09, 1948, Image 2

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Western News
AND LIBBY TIMES
W. R. LITTELL,
Editor and Manager
Published every Thursday at Libby,
Mont., by Western Montana Pub
lishing Company, Inc.
Entered at the postoffice at Libby,
Mont., as second-class matter.
OFFICIAL PAPER FOR LINCOLN
COUNTY
A Woman Passes
Judgment on
Other Women
By Charles D. Rowe
A young woman once stepped
into my office when I was still pub
lishing a newspaper who was very
indignant. A baby had been left
by a careless mother in an auto
mobile across the street and the
infant had been voicing protests to
high heaven for a considerable time.
That was what caused the young
woman's indignation. Expressing
that indignation she remarked to
me, with anger and disgust in her
voice; "Some women shouldn't be
allowed to have babies."
That incident was recalled to my
mind when I read in the Sunday
papers Kathleen Norris' weekly
column. She told of having visited
certain homes for boys in her own
neighborhood where she found 700
care of institutions. A few of the
boys were orphans. Some were from
"broken homes" caused by divorce.
Many of them had been turned over
to the homes because the mothers
were too busy in other work or
simply didn't want their own off
spring. Kathleen Norris was shocked
beyond measure. She expressed
some of that shock in these words:
"What are these mothers and
fathers putting in the boys' places?
What domestic luxuries, movies,
comfortable quiet evenings and
dancing compensate for this injus
tice to their sons and this loss to
them? Are we American women so
unimaginative and so flaccid that
we cannot adjust our lives to make
room for our boys?
"What are we made of, we Ameri
can women, that we don't dare
sacrifice, plan, contrive and work
to keep our homes and our children
together?"
All of which called back the ex
pression of the young woman in my
office—"Some women shouldn't be
allowed to have babies.'' That, of
course, is a self-evident truth. One
sees proof of it in every community.
Children brought into the world
and then shamefully neglected by
unnatural mothers and fathers.
A great hue- and cry has been
raised against the proposal to ster
ilize the unfit. We have often won
dered if the habitual criminals and
the f mentally unfit should not be
sterilized for the protection of So
ciety. But how can you reach those
otherwise normal women who give
life to a child and then heartlessly
abandon it to an institution in order
that life for them n
easier?
Once again the nation has united
in celebration of Labor Day. In our
own commundy it resulted in an
enjoyable affair participated in by
nearly the
that is as it should be.
cooperation.
symbolic of the coming
there shall be industrial peace and
cooperation throughout the world
because of industrial justice
tween man and man.
entire population. And
This happy
we hope, is merely
time when
be- 1
A man even with only half
vision must see that there is a
mighty social revolution under wav
throughout the world. The ignorant
downtrodden
feelinc it T
iust
Asia are 1
•j in the
masses of
■y are stirr
rath and rising in a mi
throw off the cruel
to
that has
Kation
centuries.
sarr
felt throughout El
Ider fon'
being
A
elsewhere
sc< n in Great Britai
m America.
The wise stab
this revolution
man will recoy
an inevitable
and
s
I
r
f
•7
1
'mm
V
/
cx
rj
Head 77 Off Trouble This Winter...
//
• Bring your car in here today for a
complete motor reconditioning be
fore winter weather sets in! We'll
grind valves, replace worn parts and
tune your care to keep it rolling for
many more trouble-free miles.
For 24 Hour Wrecker Service Call 78
0205-W or 0140-J
©'MOTORS
LIBBY
po«
S, K. SMART & H. B. STORDOCK
Mineral Ave.
PHONE 78
desirable thing. Because in it one
sees the age-old struggle of the
human family to overthrow en
trenched greed and establish a
greater justice. And happy are we
in this favored land because here
much of that struggle is in the past.
Here labor finds its greatest degree
of freedom,
highest standard of living found
anywhere on this earth. Here there
is the greatest opportunity for the
boy and girl with ability and am
bition. Under our system of gov
ernment there has followed an exis
tence so excellent that we are the
envv of the entire world.
Here there is the
And labor, of course, has had a
mighty part in bringing these good
things to pass. Labor has helped
develop a continent. Labor has
moved forward through the years
and is still moving forward. As the
days and weeks and months pass,
it is acquiring greater power and
greater responsibilities. To justify
those responsibilities it must de
velop a leadership that is altogether
wise and far-seeing. Labor has to
day won for itself such tremendous
power that it is now confronted
with the test of whether or not it
can produce leaders of real states
manship caliber. Because today its
aims and policies can no longer be
judged .solely by whether or not
such policies and aims are good only
for those who labor. The higher
test today must be whether or nut
the measures it advocates are wise
for an entire nation. That is the
high position to which labor has
finally come. It has fought its way |
upward throughout the centuries j
until now it stands as part and par- j
cel of those who decide the policies
of a nation. No longer can labor 1
be content to struggle merely to j
improve the living conditions of a :
single class. Today it must plan for !
the welfare of all the people. And i
labor's demands must of necessity '
be judged by that supreme test. \
Can labor produce a leadership that I
will measure up to that test? The |
future of today s generation de - 1
pends to a great degree on how well j
that q uestion is answered.
Merritt Dutton spent last week
in Missoula where he visited rela-1
lives and friends.
j V
; j|
A'
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.
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:#
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y
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Pirl
GOOD MAN OR GOD-MAN? |
It will do n<
that I
;ood to say
man and nothing R
either God or Heil
,h
s a
more. Jesus was
.vas not good.
A Man Who told the people of j I
from beneath; I j I
claimed that,
nor !
r.'is <
,r.i f
of God.
"V
day,
are
' Wh
He was entitled to a degree o
equal to that of "The Father:" and j
Who several hours before His death
still asserted His divine Sonship— !
such a Man could be only one of
two things: an imposter or the Son
The testimony of His contempor
aries, the witness of the Scriptures,
and the voice of history demonstrate
that, far more than being merely
)od man. Jesus Christ is the
GOD-MAN. the "God with us."
God-Man that
ubstitutionary death 1
s able to recon-1
and to wii
That i
rear the end o
••
It was
Christ. b\
earth
1 :
n
■very
I
that j
•lieve that Jesus is the |
God; and that, j
have
ST. JOHN I g
(Adv.) ; I
;, .ten.
he Son
>
;ht
'
110
n
ye
His
name. -
N CHURCH.
LUTHEF
AUTOS TRAVEL BILLIONS
OF MILES EACH YEAR
The increase in the popularity of
private motoring is one of the most
remarkable developments of modern
times. Assuming that there
1,300,000 motors cars and motor
cycles in use on the North Ameri
can continent in May 1934, the total
value at even $1,000.00 apiece—a
very reasonable estimate—would
have amounted to thirteen hundred
million dollars. If these 1,300,000
vehicles covered 5,000 miles a year,
or on the average say 100 miles a
week, it would work out that 6,
500,000,000 miles are covered in a
year by motorists, or about 70 times
the distance of the sun from the
earth.
Now these figures are accurate
for one country. The average auto
mobile consumes one gallon of gas
oline for every twenty miles of
travel so you can readily realize
the amount of gasoline that is used
in one year. This question is of
great concern to the oil companies
and as they search the world un
endingly for gasoline: the finest
automotive engineers are endeavor
ing to design engines that will run
on less gasoline or even a substitute
fuel.—CLACKS SERVICE. L. J.
Brown. Prom
were
( Adv.)
Mr. and Mrs, Earl Winfrey re
turned yesterday from Weiser. Ida.,
where they went last Friday. They
i ÿp'i £.
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DECORATING ADVICE
ovt*
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us ^
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visited at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Feid Peterson.
National Forest Timber For Sale
Scaled bids will be réceived by
the Forest Supervisor, Libby, Mon
tana, up to 4:00 p. m., October 11,
1948, for all lodgepole pine and
Douglas fir poles marked or desig
nated for cutting located on an area
embracing about 250 acres within
Section 10, T. 26 N„ R. 28 W„ M. P.
M., Elk Creek drainage, Kootenai
National Forest, Montana estimated
to be 3000 poles 30' and 35', 2000
poles 40 and 45' and 500 poles 50'
and over. No bid of less than $.01
per linear foot for 30 and 35' foot
poles, $.02 per linear foot for 40 and
45' poles and $.025 per linear foot
for poles 50' and over will be con
sidered. In addition to payments
for stumpage. purchaser will be re
quired to deposit into special funds
in the Treasury of the United States,
$.005 per linear foot for poles 30' and
over to cover costs of slash disposal.
$1000.00 must be deposited with
each bid to be applied on the pur
chase price, refunded, or retained in
part as liquidated daniages accord
ing to conditions of sale. The right
e'ec' any and all bids is re
served. Before bids are submitted,
full information concerning the tim
to
ber, the conditions of sale, and the
submission of bids should be obtain-1
ed from the District Ranger, Raven'
FREE DANCE
Saturday, September 11
-at
GOPHER INN
Fred Vignali Cr Orchestra
DONT FORGET ...
Rock Star & His Rythm Rascals
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
( Ranger Station, or the Forest Sup
ervisor, Libby, Montana
(2t - Sept, a - uctober 7)

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