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Saint Mary's beacon. [volume] (Leonard Town, Md.) 1867-1983, May 16, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82006687/1918-05-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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Terms for Transient Aclvcrtia^f
One square, op*-Insertion II OC
f ocb subsequent Insertion 5f
eiirlt 1 11 nes or less constitutes sq uan
A liberal deduction made for yeai
yadvertisements. Correspondence
solicited
I
Buy a $4.16
War Savings Stamp
The Government Buys it Back
from You January 1, 1923, for
$5.00
Buy it Outright for Cash. Or .buy it on the
Installment Plan: 25c down and 25c
whenever you feel like saving it.
HOW TO BUY IT ON THE INSTALLMENT PLAN
Go to any bank or postoiPce.
When you get inside, look for the slump window where they are selling
War Savings Stamps.
Pay 25c, and the man at the window will give you a U. S. Government
Thrift Stamp and a Thrift Card.
Paste your Thrift Stump on your Thrift ('aid.
When "you feel like saving another 25c buy another Thrift Stamp and
paste it on the same card.
When you have pasted sixteen of those Thrift Stamps on your Thrift
Card, take this card to any bank or post office; and give it to the man at
the Savings Stamp window
Also give him 12c.
The man will give you aW. S. 8.- a U. S. War Savings Stamp.
He will also give you a U. S. War Savings Certificate.
A War Savings Certificate is a pocket-size folder on which you can
paste 20 War Savings Stamps.
Paste your War Savings Stamp in your War Savings Certificate.
Take good care of it as it is worth 14.12.
On January Ist, 1923, the U. S. Government buys this War Saving,
Certificate from you, paying yon to for every stamp pasuwi on it.
Thus your War Savings Certificate has made you a profit of H.“<- on
each stump pasted on it.
This profit is -t per cent interest compounded quarterly.
It is a good profit and it is guaranteed to you by the U. S. Covet n
ment—the safest guarantee in the world
Bvery man, woman and child, in this hour of our country son d shooM
save money and buy as many War Savings Stamps us be can afford.
You can buy your second War Savings Stamp on the installment plan
just us you bought your first one.
Paste your second War Savings Stamp into your War Savings Certifi
cate.
Then you will have a complep- War Savings Certificate.
On January Ist, lU2J, the lj. S. Government will pay von ‘IOO for 110
complete War Havings Certificate.
Thus you have made a profit of JI7 60 on your War Su vlng - Cm Utica <
This profit is 4 per cent interest compounded quartei iy.
It Is a good profit and is fiuranteed to you by the f. H. Government
the strongest guarantee in the world.
HOW TO BUY IT FOR CASH.
If you do not wish to buy War Savings Stamp or ilm in 'a
plan as explained above, you simply pa,. ‘1 IJ at the v, ... •.-:: ,
Stamp window of any hank or post o'lu-
War Savings Stamps cost 34.12 du lug Jnn-..*
During February they will cost *1! t
After February they go up one cun more • icti month
So you see, the sooner you buy your slump- the more mo: . on • urn
on them.
If you should need your money .1 any tune, la -.- Vu
Certificate to any post oilier
The post office will give you n.i ,yo n- it.-.-;. m.. a. , ■ iat
the rale of aliout 9 tier cent.
If you do not wish to go to a post ofllcc o ,j. ,nk i ■ ~ , , -.,rd
“Send me one 25-cent Thrift Slum,- ('. <> I)
And write your name ami a.lil- '-s on the p t ai '
Address the postcard to *• Pit.- Post < filler
Next day your postman will tiring you a iW.ui Hint; Sc nail a
Thrift Card, C. O I).
START BUYING A IVAR SAYINGS STAMP
TOD A Y.
w. 3. S.
WAR SAVINGS STAMPS
Issued By The
U. P. GOVERNMENT.
■Qprtflbts (Bran&s (players
Kstahi.ihiikd 1842.
JHWf
“IT PAYS TO BUY THE BEST."
CHAS. M. STIEFF
1108 F St. N. W. f
WASHINGTON, D.C.
DIRECT BRANCH WAREHOUSE OE FACTORY.
Second-Hand Pianos at ail prices,
including some of our own make.
Slightly Used Player Pianos at Low Figures.
WRITE FOR CATAI/XSUE AND PRICES.
Tuning by Factory Experts. Telephone Main 29(10
J. C. CONLIFF, Manager
Help wanted
We have positions for capable men and women in our
various departments—Men’s and Boy’s Clothing, Hats.
Men’s, Women’s and Children’s Shoes, Military Goods,
Sporting Goods, Furnishing ,Goods. Will pay good
salaries to competent people.
APPLY TO MANAGER,
Saks & Company
Washington, D. C.
—"
, j
jteBHP M Mtt IBABIT I
mini ItettV Beaton.
VOL 79*

LEONARDTOWN, MD., THURSDAY, MAY 10. 1918
FOR RENT
Store building’ in Leonardtown; well
located on Main Street. Kent reason
able,, Apply /*
KINO & ABELL, a !
Leonardtown, MoT
EST. 1858. ;
Kestnodel’s Special Ouai-anteed
Razors, $2.00 ami $2.50.
Keamodol's Razor Strops, 11.00
(Genuine Horse Hide).
Kcsmodel’a Scissors in Cases. <3.50
and §3.50; 3 in case.
Manicure Sets for l.adies and Gentle
men, 13.00 to 110.00.
Caroessin Sets. <4.00 and up; in Fairs,
s’2 50 and up.
White Haudc Table Knives, $4.00 a
doz., or 6 knives and ft forks.
English Table Knives, 17.00 a dozen
(knives only.)
I’ocket Knives, 00c. and up; special
prices for school classes.
Satisfaction Guaranteed ,
Kesmodsi's Kutlery Shop i
116 Park Ave. Baltimore, Wd. ‘.
3-2-16-lv.
- — 1 *
WANTED—
Pulp Wood
5000 Cords Pine, Gum
Poplar and Sycamore
j Delivered on the Hivcr Bho f e of Sr.
M ary's 1 'u. 11 igliest ot*h price (laid
for same. Will advance money to
cut Woo l.
I LARGE OK SMALL QUA! "ITIES.
Also Want R. R. Ties &
Pine Lumber.
I Communicate with
Cm. C. Povorlcy Sc Bi o.
MECHANIC SVILLK, Ml).
2-15 If.
!
R. Duke Waihen. C tnd R. Fhunt
Night Phone Wtlbrooh St. Paul 6010 10
4 T 9
WATHEN & CO.
i
Vessel and Barge Owners,
".flip Brokers
N. W. COHN I. W
Mirltrl Place ami Pratt Slice)
BALTIMORE - v.,1
For Oiartei. Vessels and Barges o!
all sires. Insurance Ellechd Vessels
Bought and Sold, lug Boats lot
, Hire..
**

E. TRICE CO.
MKCI? AN ICS V ILLE, Ml).
Quality Stylo Priou j
Beat latest loweat *
-fWHKKi-
Buggies, Flour and Salt
bought in car lots; therefor.)
we offer a variety of buggies
to choose from at the lowest
prices.
The newest stylos In Ready to Weor
Clothing. Also agents for the Kog
llsh-Aracrlran and the Royal Tailors.
I ndiooW-.lohoson and Hely Shoes in
all styles. We buy right, are satisfied
with small profits and try to please
our customers.
■Special attention given to mail or
ders. Highest price paid for eggs.
GROCERIES. We will save you
money. Give us a call and fie con
vinced.
Flak Automobile Tires "deliv
ered by parcel post" to any part
of county.
Agents for Buffalo Paint
l-7-’ls~-y
*
Saint Wary's Academy
Leonardtown, Md„
, Conducted by the
SISTERS OF CHARITY,
OF NAZARETH, KT.
Boarding and dav School for Young
Ladles. Beautifully located on one of
the most picturesque heights of South
ern Maryland. Ideal environment
for study and recreation. Excellent
equipment, physical, moral and intor
lectunl ideals.
Courses include Academic, Interme
diate. Elementary and Commercial.
Special attention given to Music, Vo
calization and Elocution,
\ For prospectus apply to the
SISTER SUPERIOR
W. H. Moore & Co.
BDOCEBB AND
Commission Horcnauts
10S(8OirTII CHARLES ST.,
Daniel A. Darrocb
VIOLINIST
Oroheatr* for
Dane**, Entertainment*,
Wedding*, Reception*, etc.
Special attention -given to Southern
Maryland engJ^rement*.
Fhonea: Main 8474.
2618--17th St. N. W.,
Washington, U. C.
Oraville Plant Farm
Always on hand, ready fop delivery,
All Garden and Field Plant*
adapted to the season,
in large or small lots.
FaI.L Sraratt; Now is the time to
plant (or early Spring Cabbage. 100;-
•lt> Karlv Jersey WakcHeld Cabbage
flatus, 25c |>r lOti, *2 per 1000: Imme
diate delivery by parcel post, 30b per
100, Cash must accompany ordrr.
I’ersonal lnsj>clion InviUHl end de
sired.
fbone Turner's Store.
JOS. M. REEDER,
Oravlila, Md.
fl-28-lv.
$250
REWARD
Wanted for Murder,
On Ncptemlm- 4* 1817, KHNKNI j
JOHNSON. .'oluri-l, killed Captain
Hlmer (', Messiik near June#'
Wharf. Si Mary's ('minty, Md.
Johnson is described as being
about 20 year* old; height about ft
ft., 4 itu 1 ,"-. I'i -'W ii kin. (It- '•
last seen iii Baltimore City Keiuem
ber o, liu t said to claim Norfolk,
Vs,, vs hi* home.
♦afto.yvi ill Is* paid for hi* arrest
and conviction.
By order iif the County (, mtnis -
sinners for Kt. Mary'* Counlv,
JOS I Go|JGI|, Clark.
8-1 Mf.
Farm J
Investments Wanted.;
Uc|ircePtipg investor* who
:irc especially interested In
the purchase rtf
river front farm*, and act
ing for several Trust Com
panies, I am prepared to
Loan on Improved Farm
Property In Southern Md.j
50 or f)0 ? U‘t OF irs VAI.UF j
R. B. B. CHEW. Jr.,
Attorney at Lew,
612 r St.. N. W„
WASHINGTON, O. C.
KHH-3ro.
SHI/* YOUR FRESH
Eggs
to me. Get too market price*
end prompt return*.
The Food Adintnislratlon has
problhitcil the !<* of live and
dressed pullets and hens from
Kelt 2.1 It. May I. 1818, unlrss kill
ed prior to Keif. It. .Don't ship
until embargo Is raised. Tills
does not apply to turkeys, ducks,
geese, rooster* and capon*.
Knud me your name and addres*,
that I may post you on market
conditions.
If you have anything to sell or ship,
write, wire, or telephone me.
E. MAURY POSEY
BSfc 1,. Ave. N. W.
WASHINGTON, 1). C.
U. s. OoVIOOtMEJVT Jjf’rNMK No,
(J-0W36.
References : The Continental Trust
Company and mercantile agencies
e-14-Um
6th ST. and PENNA. AVE. N. W
WASHINGTON, D, C.
gg-ac
THIS HOTEL ia in the
heart, of the husinesa section j
of Washington; the moat
j ideal place in the city to
stop. You will meet here
all of your Southern Mary
land friend*.
St. Mary’s County Head
quarters.
ATLANTIC HOTEL
6th St. and Fenna., Ave. N. W.
WASHINGTON. D. C.
12-18-M3
Take the Beacon
one year--$ 1.00
|
The American Red Cross
***a***aaa#aaaaaaa*aaaaaa *■* **********
r i
Out of the Trenches for a Breathing Space |
' *' ‘oj U Klugg.
“They Are Our Boys; Get
Ready, Everyone, for a Rush!”
Tbs tons train of freight cars wblnt, Inside it** building there were more py, sailllng women might h tired, nor
and grumbled it iru*e (o stop I* -r an spick aim .pan in white, were they tired then, even though *ll
lit* doorway o( a great tow building • | im, f„,,,, hcsming. handing om good day long they had been serving iraln
white capped ami gowned woman re i firne rooked- food over spotlem Pledl '- <r "" 1 of *"*
leaned a atm By sn.ite and. lutum* *■> ; . Homa of the ba talrlv ran m *' rl * ll ? thousand* of lhe in.
her voted earn eft mm Ih. I, lt, tins, I ,r * ,Z. >e. what did ih*l matter? Kor ibeae
, .wiled out. -Tbav r* sura: get r**d, f ' ,f U " ■ o, h a nil Into ih "* tmy* (y, a i rau.e at the end of a long
fat rush." lonterics of tsttha, throwing out their rtl(J , three beys are -aura."
<|o*l bow ah* could tell they •rl''" nl11 ridden etofbea to be sterilised j u ynur hoy is In I‘ntnea yon may he
would he bard lo egpialn tor *•>** tbev rri|lit>ed 'he'r hoc tea bach' sore he has a song of p-al*e for Ih#
1 th# moment she tpoke boodre,l wr ju • bed by glow. tine women at work In the railway
Iba dtrtleal, grljm,t men woman I W><nt luiory It all waa food, tardea. .anteens of our own [led Ctw*. for at
ever new ram* fairly tunihiing out of j rhalra. things to read, gamra to play, kit) import am railway Junction Ihera
iba freight eara, A moment more .h*- paper for wetting, a barber almm a i ime of our lied Cross canteen* and
was welcoming Ibis rotiddy ratdde with j movie theater and good, elenn bedal at -wch canteen there are 18 women
i a laugh sod cheering worda j No one ru-r Uiought (tat I lit**, hap- real, irue American women,
SPEAKING OF MONEY
Just How the Goodfields—
The Stingiest Couple in Town-
Helped the Red Cross
Bv BOOTH TARKINGTON
Of the Vigilantes
"Speakmg of money." wild my sea i
faring friend of the Maine ntsl. we |
: need to have an old mini hen- mimed j
Uoodfisld When he *m young he
uaed (o elng In (he church choir Ihai
didn't coot nothin mid married mi*
of the Embers**, hul didn't b*e only
one child, sod It died, end Him be got
to be about sixty eight years old he'd
saved up and was hirin' oub bis room
ey at about as high a p cent, as soy
body. Mad* It all Just irndln and
bein’ careful what he epeiu. ■s’ure
(uir He wouldn't buy hlasclf a pair
of brltrbe* but once In clgut years,
end when hi* old slater that lived with
'em says one day she u hound to
see wbat the Inside the pitcher show ,
theater looked like Just once before
she died, why, old Unodtlrld and bis
wife tnys that win the linn alraw. and
they fixed up and had tier hauled off
to live on the County. Ills wife was
pud the same aa him, too.
"Well, along about the middle o'
the bard winter, three years ago.
Good field took alck. and his wife told [
the neighbor* they both thought II
wu • pretty good thing, condo on
him In the cold weather that way, tie i
cause fuel wa* an high and a person |
In bed don't need to use miy. They
wouldn't hear of railin' In doctor,
and (or two or three week* the neigh
bora and old friends, most of ero, was
•ore be was goln' to die, hut then
be begun to look on well there didn't
hardly teem to he mueh hope.
Old Ooodfleld Walks Ift.
“He got to goln out ami Khnmhlln’
around again, and for awhile there
waan't nobody noticed anything much
different. I reckon I wu the ttrat,
and II come about mighty queer It
ivaa like this: t was workin' In my
shack one night firclly late, tryln to
spell out what wna the matter with a
carburetor I'd brought up from my
boat, wliimi there colon a nip on the
door, and old Good Held w slks In. I
waa kind o’ surprised to sec him, hot I
didn't say nothin’ rept 'timid evenin','
and all of a sodden he any*. ‘f>o yoo
know how much money I’m worth?'
Steam and Hot Water fteatintf.*' Tin Roolmsr and Sf-outinir.
HO H ARO S. KIRBY
Licensed t>unitary Plumber and Gas Flttsr
, i
HOT AIK rUKNACES SCT AND HEP A tHED
I Order* Promptly Attended To.
Great Mills, St. Mary's County, Md.
3-22-17-1 v -.y, CV & P.'Phonk. . „ ...
lie said It )ust tike that—nuiliin'.
I before It—and 1 anld, 'For the Lord’* j
( ■“ike. Mr. (ioodfiehl, what's the mat j
i ter 1 llv looked kind of tunny to me. |
"Tw worth a hundred and twenty-1
(out ihounaiid threw hundred and sil
ly three dollar* ai.n till)one cent*,
lie soys
’’ Welt, by Orry I I says
"Well, air, tse begun to pant like!
be i) been riimdn' up a hill: he gui to
heasln Uk* u winded horse. then he
begun to cry and sob like a Woiiiau
Ibsi a all ezrlled when aome one's lu-i
dlel ‘Well, by Orry! I nays 'You
beitei set down and quid yourself, I
siiya 'Whafa the matter?
“ I got to .He,' lie says I been i
! - k,' be says. 'I been sick and I got
lu diet' i
"‘Well,' I says. 'we nit got to dte.
“He kep straight on cryln' and j
panlln and sohhlo'
" 'Ve*. he saya. 'hut 1 never kunwed :
I had to I f never knowed It before I.
was slek. I kind o thought l wouldn't
retdy haf to, when II conic rigid down ;
' to It, *•
, "'Were all fixed that way,' I saya. j
'We all got to have some sickness -,• j
I won't get over.
••Well, sir. he lei out u yell that Inst
about now in> halt The rest of you
1 ain't got a hundred and tlveuty four
I thousand three hundred anil sixty
ihre dollars and fifty-one cental' he
hollers. ‘And I got to die 1 * be says;
and he kep' on hind of ehoutin it. ‘I
got to die! I got to die! I got to
die! Ami then lie pllehes over before
I could cniih turn and fell down on s
couple o' busied lobs'ci Imps.
"Ole <’ap, Whitcomb, he woke up In
Ids shack next 'loot and pm on some
elo'ea. and come In look In scared to
death. Him and me picked Good
field up oil the traps end got him
home, half earryln' him, and him kind
of whimperin' and slobberin' rigid on
to when we left him doublet) up on a
rickety etinlr at his own bouse.
"Nevi day he was e round lust
aland the same us evei nod never i
said oo'h ii ahom and the!
week .if'.ci bm he -it Uwelul'j
4905
boat In for ■ debt, and 700 couldn't
1 old there wm anythin' the matter
with him. What I mean, you couldn't
told nothin' on him In daytime, but
after dark he'd go shamblin' all
around the tillage, and then when It
gut lute. If he see a light aomewherea,
he’d go In there and have a spell Just
tlie Mine he hud with me. beared
people with them spells, be did.
The Last of Ooodfleld'a Money
" 'lavii* alioiil Sepiemher his wife up
nod supprincd everybody, because she
went to all the expense of havin' the
<dd iimn declared Inaune and hauled
oil to the asylum, lie cut hla throat
with a piece of broken bottle up there,
and the funniest thing happened—they
found the old woman dead the aama
afternoon in their house here! The
court gave the eatnte to a trual com
pany, and I guess that was the end of
old dnodfkdd a hundred and twenty
four thousand three hundred and sla
ty three dollars and flfly-ona cents
•'Wed. air, yon know all that about
old Mr. and Mra. Uoodlleld made a
kind n( a sensation, as yon might call
It. nnd (here was quite a good deal of
Ihlnkln and talkin' about It here In
the village. There was some that
claimed they figgered out how It all
was meant to mean somethin'
■'Anyway, when the call come from
Halifax last December we aeol off
mighty near halt a carload of first
rule nothin' right In a few hours, and
there was (wo hundred and seventy
odd dollars susscrlbed Just In the vtl
(age, and you know there wasn't hard
ly any of 11a real sure we could see
the winter through ourselves.
'■Yea. I'll pul my name down for the
lied Cross, nnd Til shell out. I guess
you won't have much trouble glttln’
susscrlptloiis from the rest, either.
V. 0 got a good many hoys from here
over there now, and w# wouldn't like
to think of 'em shot nnd Inyln' out In
the Helds twistin’ around and nobody
10 tend 'em because ua at home hadn't
found out yet that It's a mistake to
think we’re still goln' to have our sav
in's right nice and with us when ws'rs
dead I*
• • .—1 .
Cliff Cave Dwellers,
Tht cliff dweller* knew nothing fl(
the w of metal*. Their knives were
made from the bone* of the deer, high*
1/ polished and Tory sharp. Their
household ntenaila constated of pottery
Jar* and casks made of fiber and oor
ered with a substance resembling mod*
era varnish. Although the earliest
cliff dweller* were prehistoric, cave
livers have existed in almost every
age of the world. The ancient Horltes
derived their name from their prac
tlce jfL living tg caverns and snbter-
JOB PRiNTiMGI
biLi. 'Rada lkttkh bus
STATEMENTS
ENVELOPES BUSINESS CAKU
HANDBILLS
INVITATIONS PHOGKAHS
CIRCULARS
POST BBS LEGAL BLANKS ETC
CITY PRICES
GROCERS HELP
IN SHO PLAN
SIGN PLEDGE TO CARRY OUT
FOOD ADMINISTRATION
PROGRAM.
POST CARDS IN STORES.
Explain New Wheat Ruling to
Thousands of Customers-—ln
sures Greater Food Saving.
Grocers of tha nation have accepted
enthusiastically tha 50-50 basis for tha
porchiiaa of wheal hour and are doing
their utmost (o explain the new regu
lation to the housewife. This ruling by
the U. 8. Food Administration requires
each purchaser of wheat Sour to buy
ona pound of cereal substitute, one
kind or assorted, for every pound of
wheat flour. It was necessary to re
strict the use of wheot flour In order
that the allies and our lighting forces
abroad might be assured of an ade
quate supply of wheat to meet their
vital needs. This supply must come
from our savings because we have al
ready sent our normal surplus
Wheat saving pledge cards were for
warded by the Food Administration to
■ll retail food merchants, and these
are being signed end posted In stores
throughout the country. This card
stales "We pledge ourselves loyally to
carry out the Food Administration pro
gram, In accordance with this order
we will not ee|l any wheat flour except
where the purchaser buys an equal
weight of one or mure of the following,
a greater use of which In the home
will save wheat;
"Cornmeal, corn flour, edible corn
•lurch, hominy, corn grits barley flour,
potato flour, sweet potato flour, soy
bean floor, feterlta flour and meals
rice, rice flour, oatmeal, rolled oats and
buckwheat flour."
Home confusion has resulted no tha
part of tha consumer In construing
this "80-flO" ruling to mean that an
equal amount In value of substitutes
must he purchased with wheal flour.
This la a mistaken Ides The ruling
slates that the consumer to purchasing
floor shall "buy at the same lime an
equal weight of other cereals."
One exception to this ruling Is con
cerning graham flour sad whole wheal
flour, which may bo sold at Ihe ratio
of throe pounds to flv* pounds of
wheal flour. Thta provision Is made
because approximately 25 per cent,
more of the wheat berry Is used In the
manufacture of these flours than stand
ard wheat flour. —v__
Another exception te that concern
ing mixed flours containing lean than
50 per cent, of wheat flour, which may
he sold without substitutes Hrtsllers
however, are forbidden to sell mixed
flours containing more than BO per
cent, of wheat flour to any person un
leas the amount of wheat flour substi
tutes sold la sufficient to make the to
tal amount of substitutes. Including
those mixed In flours, equal to the to
fnl amount In wheat flour In the mixed
flour. For Instance, If any mixed flour
Is purchased containing HO per cent,
wheal flour and 40 per cent, substi
tutes It la necessary that an additional
.’ll per cent of substitutes tie pur
chased This brings It to Ihe basis of
one pound of substitutes for each
pound of wheat flour.
A special exemption may be grunted /
upon application In the rase of special
ly prepared Infanta' and Invalids’ food
containing flour where Ihe necessity la
•liown
Home misunderstanding seems lo ox
-Ist on Ihe part of consumers In sssum-
Ing that with the purchase of wheal
flour one mttsl confine the additional
in |>er cent, purchase to one of the
substitutes This Is not the ense. On*
may select from the entire range of
substitutes n sufficient amount of each
to bring the total weight of all substi
tutes equal to the weight of the wheal
flour purchased. For Instance, If a
pun-hate of 24 pounds of wheal flout
Is made a range of aiihstltnfes may be
selected ns follows;
Cornmeal. 8 pounds; com grits, 4
pounds: rice, 4 ponnda; buckwheat, J
pounds; corn starch, 1 pound ; hominy,
2 pounds; rolled oats, 3 pounds.
These substitutes msy be used In
Ihe following manner;
Cornmeal, 8 I*ollollß. —Corn bread, no
flour; corn muffins or spoon bread,
one-fourth flour or one-thlrrt rice oz
one-ihlrd hominy; 20 per cent, substi
tutes in whole brand
Cor/f* Hlarch, 1 Found.—Thickening
gravy, making custard, one-third sub
stitute In cake.
Corn Orlta, 4 Pounds.—Fried Ilk*
mush, used with meal In making com
bread.
(tolled Oats, 3 Pounds. —One-fourth
to one-third substitutes In bread, one
half substitute In muffins; breakfast
porridge, use freely; oatmeal cookies,
oatmeal soup.
Buckwheat Flour. 2 Pounds.—One
fourth substitute In bread, buckwheat
enkea
Hominy. 2 Pounda.—Boiled for din
ner. baked for dinner, with cheeas
aauce.
Rice, 4 Ponnda.—One-fourth auhan
tnfe In wheat bread, one-third substi
tute In com bread, boiled for dinner (a
bread cut), as a breakfast food, to
thicken soups, rlca pudding Instead of
coke or pie, rice hatter cakes.
Several grocers have stated lhat
tbelr customers who strictly observe
Ihe tl wbeatless meals each week And
It necessary to buy substitutes In ad
dition to those ordered under tha 8080
BO plan.
, Ingenuity, energy; In a word, what*
1 soever of strength the man had la
1 him will lie written In the work ho'
' does. —Carlyle,
Milking Excited Him.
Henry, aged six, who had Jnst been
in the barn watching hi* unde milk
the cows, went In the house Ailed with
exdtament and sat down to eet hie
Later when mother asked
he didn't drink hla coffee, ho
replied, “Oh, mother, I forgot to mUk

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