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Saint Mary's beacon. (Leonard Town, Md.) 1867-1983, June 27, 1918, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82006687/1918-06-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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I SAINT MARY’S BEACONj*
A. F. KIN.Q Bditor
L. F. ABELL Manager
I' ■
Entered at the Leonard town Poatoffice as second
oiaas matter under the Act ot May, 1898.
LEONARDTOWN. MD.. THURSDAY MORNING. JUNE 21. 1918.
Notice to Correspondents:
Our correspondents are requested to send in their
communications in time for current issue. We
are most anxious to publish all communications,
but copy must be in this office by 4 p. m. Tuesday.
It would be difficult to imagine a greater ca
lamity to St Mary’s than the destruction of the
railroad from Brandywine to Mechanicsville, and
we are glad that the people of the county have
realized this and have averted the danger that
threatened. The Government has accepted the
assurance of the Finance Committee of the new
company that they would be prepared to close
the deal on July 3, but there is still urgent need
ol additional stock subscriptions to provide funds
for the repair of the road and equipment so
that it can resume operation.
A meeting for this purpose will be held in
Leonardtown tomorrow (Friday) evening at
8:30 p. m. Among the speakers who will
present the railroad status to date and oudine
the plans for the future, will be Messrs. John
Mudd, J. Hampton Magruder, Rev. Father
Maguire and probably Hon. Sydney E. Mudd.
Every man and woman who has at heart the
welfare of the county and hopes to see a con
tinuance of our present prosperity should attend
this meeting.
The great majority of the farmers of St.
Mary’s who have been asked for their opinions
of the labor situation agree that no actual short
age exists, but that the whole trouble is caused
by who not keep regularly employed.
* Working two or or even five
is not a compliance wrUb ale i<iw. Six days of
work is required by the Compulsory Work
Act, and the man who persists in working less
than that is liable to registration as an idler.
There should be no compromise at this critical
period, and it is just as much the duty of every
citizen to report the loafers in his neighborhood
as it is incumbent on the police officials to en
force the law when violations are brought to
their attention. No man is justified in com
plaining of the scarcity of help when he fails in
nis own duty to report the idlers in his com
munity.
There is no means of escaping from the in
dividual duty of every man to co-operate for
the strict observance of this law. Every offer
of outside assistance to relieve the labor situation
has been met with the statement that there was
plenty of labor in the county if it would only
work. The writer can bear personal testimony
that this answer has been given lime and time
again by representative and responsible fanners
when State and government agents have come
here to make a survey of the county’s needs.
The extraordinary session of the Legislature
last year provided a means to compel the full
• employment of every able-bodied man in the
State. The matter is strictly up to the employ
ers to take advantage of this law and force a
“work or fight” slogan on the idling parasites
who are a constant drag and drain on the indus
try and resources of the county.
Send in the names of the loafers to the prop
er bureau, whose agents will make a special in
vestigation of each case. Every possible assur
ance has been made that prosecution will follow
when the evidence shows that the law has been
violated.
When the whole world is crying for food
and all industry is handicapped by lack of man
power, loafing is a crime and should be punish
\ ed as such. 'Report eveiy man who is not
regularly employed to Mr. George A. Mahone,
Maryland Compulsory Work Bureau, 401
Union Trust Building, Baltimore, or to Mr. E.
I. Plowden, Leonardtown. The name of the
Threshmen and Farmers
Must Co-operate.
Cooperation between farmer and
threehman no# and within the next
few weeks means several thousand
bushels of wheat saved in Maryland.
How to work together rs Already re
ceding the attention of threshmen
and of farmer’s clubs throughout
State.
Under no oironmetaneee should
bundles be put in tke bam or other
shelter when the straw is either
damp or wet, for that means mold
ing and a certain loss in tbrssbing.
As few setting* as possible of
threshing machines saves both labor
and wheat, the ecarcity of which
no one denied. Many threekmen
have already planned their routes so
doubling back will bs unnecessary
and the threshing will be completed
at each in one setting, two under
some conditions. This plan pre
vents large crews of men being idle
waiting for the machine to start.
■ Coal is saved because every time a
, threehmsn leaves the farm he fHis
[the engine’s bunkers.
Good fuel means plenty of power
, for difficult threshing and indirectly ’
saves many a bushel of wheat. The
1 most competent operator has seri
, out diflSculties to contend with in
maintaining steam with almost til
of the so-called thresher's coal. On
, numerous occasions last year tbresh
ling had to stop while the engine
operator got up more steam. Of
> course, the crew eae idle during
this time. Tbit wasted lime is bad
> enough, but to make matters worse,
the farmer is called upon to furnish
about twice at much coal, cOnse
l qnently it will pay every farmer
£ who buys coal for threshing to
[search until a good quality is obtain
ed. This problem can beat be solv
. ed by co-operation between fanner
and threshmen.
• Preparedness in threshing mean
f no cause for delay after the thresh
ing outfit is in position, Weler
* and kindling for the engine must b
available. Pitchforks and sacks, in
fact, everything nepsesary should
be on hand. loborers most be
] ready to work. Having everything
ready in advance will save much
time and wheal.
Correct feeding ia of the utmost I
importance and is frequently over
* looked. It meant regular feeding
S heads first of bundles which are
evenly distributed on the carrier.
. Always beads first, never crosswise
J nor butts first. Threshing machines
are built to bundle grain only in
* this way. Any other method mesne
grain. Men who refuse tu feed
properly should be assigned other
work to do, for the wheat is wanted
in tke bag, not in the stack. Neith
er chickens nor animals of any kind
can successfully get wheat out of
the sack. It ia sacked or it ia lost,
therefore it is almost impossible to
over emphasise correct feeding of
the throwing machines.
f New Advertisements 1
X wx. —ihjr. *•iaSia -m-j. jw,v ’■uj. W.S, -wmj. "WA JL
For Sale
Corn, 910 per barrel.
Haled Hay-new crop Alfalfa and
Clover.
J -B. ABELL,
Baytlde Farm,
Clements, Md.
ft-n-it
Red Gross Dance
At
ST. JOSEPHS HALL
Monday, July 1
CITY MUSIC
Kffre* hmen t *
Fireworks-
Firecrackers!
With their usual vim and
enthusiasm, the Fourth
District will entertain with
patriotic songs, patriotic
sketches and martial music
8:30 P. I. July 4.
Chaptico Hall
Notice to Creditors.
Orphans' Court of at Mery ■ County, Ust
Juno 11. lift.
ORUBRRU BY TUB COURT, Thnt Wo.
Uoverall boker. Administrator of Robert T.
Unroll, let# of Bt. Merv's county, deceased,
give tbs notice required by lew to the do
ooeood’s creditors to exhibit their claims,
end that these ms be published ones e week
for Ms successive weeks la the at. Mery’s
Bseoon.
Btsi. Cowes,
Raetstsr ofWUIe,
True copy. Tost: Bear. Combs,
Resistor of WUlsfor Ht. Uerv'sOonnty.
In pursuance of tbs above order, 1 hereby
,lvenotice that 1 bevsobtelnsrt from the Or
phans' Court of at. Mery’s county, Md., lot
fare of Administration on the person el estate
ROBERT T. BURCH,
late of said county, deceased, ah persons
having claims s telnet the said dsrreesd ere
hereby notlOsd to exhibit the same with tbs
proper vouchers attached thereto, to the sub
scriber aa or eaters the nth day of Dec..
HUB, they will otherwise tar law ha excluded
Bent aujmw
meka Immediate per merit to the subscriber
w- usVkusi 1 roves
I’ In These Strenuous Days I
A sound banking connection it of vital importance
to tbs basinets man. *• Hs*
The First Nations! Beak offer* the farmers and 1 J,!
basinet* men of this county its service* in the H
most person si way, and gladly places its complete
facilities at the command of customers.
You will find it an advantage to carry vonr sc- Hip
count with the First National.
■■
4 4 Per Cent Interest Paid in our Savings
Department, j Capital h 50,000.00;
Surplus tat,000,00; Resources ...
♦a To, 000. 00.
First National Bank of St. Mary’s H
THE BANK OB SERVICE |||
I tOMABDTOWR. MD. ’Hff
*
m hhh|
Where Spend the Fourth?
Why Not Enjoy the Fifteenth
Grand Annual 4th of July Picnic
To Be Held at
BENEDICT?
(Benefit of St. Prtncia de Sales).
There will he Washington Music and
Dancing Afternoon ana Evening, lieniden
Other Attraction You will Enjoy.
Our Dinner and Supper are well Worth
the 7Ac. Special Prices for Children.
Don’t forget, you are to spend
the Fourth at Benedict,
on the Patuxent I
! **.
-r- - mi,- ■ n--, -————^——■—■———a————a
Sapolio doing its work. Scouring
forULSMarine Corps recruits.
i,v.
SERVICE UNDER THIS EMBLEM
|bills|
I The Packer’s Bill 9
9 for Live Stock 9
Ph ufl c
iy For the first si* month* of our operations
I under the Food Administration, ending
April 30, 1918. Swift A Company paid for |h -
livestock -TSsa.’SK.OOO $323300,000 I \
For the ume
period in 19171338300300 $210300300
B Increase In
Weight 16V4% 220300300
Increase ~ , i 0
in coat 54% V . - $113,400,000
H |H
M $ e j mm
H v.c'lj - - HH
II The Consumer’s I
ft Bill fair Meat 9
fio a ’ H
n| >vg j ** ■ ■>■ •
must necessarily have increased
correspondingly, as Live Stock
prices and meat prices fluctuate
together.
When the producer gets high
prices for his live stock, the con
sumer’s meat bill must neces
sarily be larger.
Year Book at Interesting end
instructive Nets sent on request
Address Swift ft Company,
Union Stock Yards, Chicago, Oftnois
H Swift & Company, U.S.A. I
Attend the Railroad Meeting in I
1 ~~— I. 93 LI
FOURTH OF JULY
RIVER SPRINGS
PATRIOTIC PROGRAM BY
National Council of Defense
At 2 P. M.
CHORUSES ORATIONS
Patriotic Drama
“Cry of the Belgian Children"
BY RIVER SPRINGS SCHOOL
Free Oyster Scald at 3 P. M.
Dinner and Supper Served
CITY MUSIC AND BALL
Notice to Taxpayers!
My Lest Visit for the Purpose of
Celleetlng 1016 and 1017 Tease
I will lie at the following plaoos on
Urn dsya and dales mentioned Mow:
Monday, June 24, Uillvllle, V a. in.
to II a. m.
Monday, Juno 24, Median tea villa, I
p. n. to 4 p, ra,
Tuesday, June 25, Jarboesville, 9 a.
m. in 12 m.
Wednesday, June SB, ChspUco, 10 a.
m. to 12 a.
Wtdoetdav, June 20, MDeatown, I
p. a. to I p. m
Thursday, June 21, St. Inlgoo., W a. I
at. to It m
Friday, June 28, Valley Use, * ,J.
to 12 a. v
Friday, June2B, fit. George’* iked,
LJO p. a. Is 4 p. a.
LAWRENCE P WILLI A Ml,
1 - . OsunC .Teaser ear
SHIP \IK YOU It
Live Poultry
Oat tsp market prises
•M prompt returns.
MV LONG EXPERIENCE ENABLES
ME TO OBTAIN HIGH PRICES
FOR GOOD STOCK.
Heod me your name and address,
that I may post you on market
condition.
E. MAURY POSEY
936 La. Ave. M. W.
WASHINGTON, 1). C.
U. 8. UOTUtSKUNT UCKNHK NO.
04)1536.
References The Continental Trust
Company and mercantile agencies.
6-14-Sa
WANTED
Female nurae or attendant for a
sanitarium for nrrvout and Mental
diseases Salary 324.00 a month with
board and laundry. Address,
8 LORO,
6-Mlt. Stamford, Conn.
I “JT Sc (Emnjmmj w tr
I /mi' Keep Kool Clothes
~**y are true to their
.(1 Ssffo name; and true to the
I'N V/ ,A n Saks r eputation for
WSk 'IV \< M i[\\^ tailoring excellence.
l n Keep Kool Clothes you can be comfort-
I -^TT\Nj| able and at the same time properly dressed for
IfV \\ business and the more formal occasions of sum-
Iftgl
3V and conservative styles—accurately tailored
| —insuring permanent shapeliness.
I Keep Kool Clothes . . $13.50 and sls I
I Mohair * sls to $25 I
Silk •■••••••••••• S2O and $25
II Special— Whitt * Flannel Trousers—Cuff Bottoms
SPRING AND SUMMER OPENING
M. LEVIN, MORGANZA, MU.
I have the most up 10-date Spring and Summer
stock that I have ever carrlsd.
The follow are only a few of the bargains I am
offering thalwlM buver - \
■ lmT’• Cool Cloth Pinchbeck Hull*, lingular (Viop 19.00, now 16.25
Bojr*' Blue and Gray Checked Mull*, “ •• 4.50, " 3.2 S
Men's Black Oxford Shoe*, '• •• 3.26, “ 2.25
Men’* Baibriggan Shirt* nod Drawer*. “ '• 60c “ 39c
Large Line Ladies' 'hoes. Oxfords ard Pomps,
Small Site*, from 11. 2 ft to $9.25
Special—Automobile Tires
Quaker Tire*, 5.000 Mile Guarantee, 25 Per Cent off Itegular Price.
30*3 1-2, Non Hktd. List IVice *27.00, Hale Price, *20.25
30*3 “ *• •• 21.45, “ " 16.10 *
30*3 1-2 Plain *• “ '24.30, " “ 18.28
30*3 “ “ “ 19.45, “ •• 14.60
The above give- *n idea of the exceptional values
I am offering, but I am celling my entire stock at
lowest possible prices. A visit to my store will
supply your needs and save vou money.
Don’t buy your "Fruit Jars until 1 quote my prices,
M. Levin
MORGANZA, MD._

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