OCR Interpretation


Lewiston teller. [volume] (Lewiston, North Idaho) 1878-1900, October 18, 1888, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82007023/1888-10-18/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

lt/11 • ' IP E
TERMS IN ADVANCE.
romwE 13,
____________DEVOTED TO THE BEST INTERESTS NORTHERNIDAHO AND SURROUNDIN'; COUNTRY.
LEWISTON IDAHO TEHIUTOHV. TÏIU ilSDAY,OCTOBER 18, 1888^
•3 PER YEAR.
MMBË3V».
B
CR
3
w
* I
55 as 'Z, 55 ü; fc5
ÖÖÖOÖÖ
Sc w tr ?r ts ta
<<<<-;<
»
jlfe:: .
<5 / tffe v. ■
g fi ■ : - .
* #' ■' ^ • ■'".
2 / -
' > •■ • :CvCli
■ , -SH^.
- .' -:'-.,»4
- • ."• '--«y-pV
• •'.• ''c '.,17"
'Y
:> ' t <2^ . J
rr ^i
j
QC
P
! sc ts ss ?c w
BKHSRK
*
s
THE LE'iilSTON TELLER
Publisliect Every Thursday evening
—BY —
A. LELAND & SON,
Terms of Sabsciiptioü, al Coin
SiHOLP.Coi'r per Ye An ....................
" M fc?ix Months..............
" ** Two Months.............
Single Nmraber................................
PiepajiacDt in t*ll cases demanded,
per* discontinued when time of subscription
das expired.
ALONZO LELAND. CHAS. P. LELAND,
..$3 00
.. 2 00
.. 1 00
.. 10
All p*
WLacvm of Adrertielns Reduced, kn Colo
Oce Square (1 inch in column) 1 insertion $1 50
E*oh additional insertion.................. 50
Two Squares one insertion..................... 2 00
Each additional insertion................... 1 00
Three Squares one insertion..............*••• 3 00
Each additional insertion................ . 1 00
l* 0 ur Squires one insertion................... i:
Each additional insertion................... 1 5u
Tearly, half yearly and quarterly advertis
ements more than four squares inserted
by special contract.
Professional and Artisans' Cards of one
square or less, per quarter.................. 3 00
ffetioes in local oolumn (except voluntary)
per line..........................................
But aene for less than.......................... 1 00
Beeiety advertisements and resolutions per
liaeeaoh insertion ....................... . 10
Lsial Advertising tin tea« la Cola :
Summons, Sheriff's Sales and all other le
gal notices per ineh first insertion..... ..$1 50
Bach subsequent insertion ................ 50
All transient advertisements and notices
prepayment demanded, ail others paya
ble quarterly.
SPOKANE! PALOUSE
Railr o ad,
Stages will leave Lewiston
EVERY MORNING
At 6 o'clock, for
UNIONTOWN, and COLTON,
Connecting with the S. k P. Railroad
for Pullman, Pulouse City, Garfieid,
Belmont and Spokane; and on Tues
day, Thursday and Saturday tor Colfax
RETURNING—Will Inn Colfax op Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, and Coltoa aid
Vo ion town, daily, oo tha arrival of train
from Spokane. Leaves Lewiston, daily, at
4, p. in., oonnneting with the trnia at Caltoa.
Lewiston OBoe, at Raymond House; Colfax
OBoa at Baldwin House: Colton .Bo. at
Colton Hotol. R. U. DUFF. Prop.
28tf
PHVSICIAKS.
E F. S. STIRLING, M.D
OFFICE—On Main straat, Iwj ioors abov
Raymond House
H. Vi. STAÎMYON,
Physician and Surgeon,
LEWISTON, I. T,
Office and Residence—Montgomery Street
Head of Fourth. -tf
J. B. MORRIS M. D.
Physician and Suxgeon.
OFFICE—in Hale A Cooper's building. RES
IDENCE—at T. S. Billing'e, Lewiston,
Idaho. 33-3m.
C. W. SHAFF. M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office on north sido of Main street, over First
National Bank. 31 -tf
F. J. BOSTON,
DENTIST.
All dental anrgery performed skillfully and
gaurantoed to give satisfaction or money re
funded. Offlee—Up stuirs in Vollmer à Ce.'e
brick building, Lewiston, Idaho. 51
B re««,. nmiUlied. Uunruttcd th.
7 " ! *ly v»e in the world mneratin*
tuntinuouB E latrie « Maanetü
'• SHrrtlflr. Powerful, Dumb!«,
and I ftffitve. Avoid frauda.
*■ NOME, Inventus, ioi Waiam avi. Pu —n
D. D. BUNNELL, agent at 'Lewiston
Idaho. 31.ly.
ADVERTISE.
"Tell me net in mounrful numbers,"
Advertising doesn't pay ;
For the man's non compos mentis
Who would such absurd things say.
"Life is real ! Life is earnest !"
And the man who hopes to rise
To success in any calling,
Most expect to advertise.
"In the world's broad field of battle,
In the conflict of real life,"
Advertising is the secret
Of achievement in the strife,
"Lives of rich men all remind us,
We can make our own sublime;"
And by libersl advertising
To the highest summit climb.
"Let us then be up and doing,"
In the Review our ads insert ;
"Still achieving, still pursuing,"
Business then will be alert,
-Spokane Falls Review.
MORMON RANTINGS.
Salt Lake City, Utah, Oct. 6. —To
day was the second day of the Mormon
fall conference. Apostle Grant called
loudly for tithings, saying those who
paid freely were the most happy and
prosperous ; declared the saints must live
up to the whole law of God. A. B.
Morgan called for the education of
Mormon children in schools where they
can learn that Joseph Smith was a
prophet. Apostacy was not so much
because of infidelity as ignorance of the
true principles of the Gospel. Apostle
Richards declared that the Baints must
live for the Lord and educate her
ohildren in the faith. It is the duty of
the priesthood to look after this, but it
is not done. We must promoto the
young men to look after this, Elder
Nobel thanked God that be had seen
old scenes.
WE MUST BE UNITED
and carry ont the principles of the gospel,
educate our children properly and no
power no earth can prevail against us.
A. P. Cannon, a "penitentiary martyr,"
said : He had seen the place whence
the saint had been driven ; these places
had * been cuned of God and are unfit
for the habitation of men. It is not
crawling to accept martyrdom from
unjuat bands, which is only a test of our
faith. The kingdom of God is now
established, never to go down.
A HITHERTO UNPUBLISHED
LETTER.
Bust ,-n Letter to the Now York Tribune!
The letter which has never been
published, is as follows:
BnooKLYN, Nov. S), 1S72.—My
Dear Mr. Greeley: I read your card in
the Tribune with sincere pleasure, and
congratulate myself aud the cause of
journalism vm your return to a field in
which you have won so much reputation
and where you have done such service
that the history of Ameriea cannot be
written without including, as an im
portant part of it, your life and services.
You may think, amidst clouds of
smoke and dust, that all your old friends
who parted company with you in the
late campaign will turn a momentary
difference into a lifelong alienation. It
will uot be so. I speak for myself, and
also from what I perceive in other men's
hearts. Your mere political influence
may for a time be impaired, but your
own power for good in the far wider
fields of indusrial economy, social and
civil criticism, and the general well
being of society, will not he lessened, but
augmented. It is true that hitherto the
times called for a warrior, and such you
were ; yet I cannot but think with
regret how much ability has beeu spent
by you that died with the occasion, and
which might have built up positive and
permanent elements. But I look upon
your years to come as likely to be more
fruitful and irradiated with a kind and
bénéficient fight, which will leave your
name in honor far greater than if you
had reached the highest office,
I beg that you will pardon my intru
sion, especially when you stand in the
shadow of a great trouble. I hoped that
a word of honest respect and sympathy
might not displease you. There are
thousands who would like to do aa I
have done, and who with me will rejoice
onee more to be in sympathy with you
in all thiega bénéficient and patriot».
I am, my dear Mr. Greeley, very trnly
yours.
(signed)
Henry Ward Beecher.
JUDGE GREENE S OPINION.
Roger S. Greene, cz-chicf justice of
Washington Territory, in answer to the
question if he was in favor of the annex
ation of North Idaho to Washington,
said: "Geographically, the Pan handle
of Idaho belongs to the state of Wash
ington and the boundaries of the state
should include it, if consistent with the
wishes of the people."
The people of North Idaho are glad
to have a man of Judge Greene's intel
ligence and large observation of thiegs
on this northwest coast, and long resi
dence in Washington Territory, whose
integrity of purpose and honest opinions
no man has ever questioned or dare to
questiuD, so out-spoken upon the
question of annexation, upou a question
of so much importance to the people of
North Idaho. It puts iu the shade all
the misrepresentations of facts which
have over been made in South Idaho by
politicians and the people there since the
agitation of the question in 1864 and
1865. Is it any wonder that the
majority of the people of North Idaho
and Washington should desire this
annexation ?
Pullman is one of tho best business
towns in Eastern Washington. The
peculiarity of tho place is that while its
area is small its business is large and
constantly increasing. Its founders, in
an early day, wisely procured good
wagon roads to it from all the sections
round about. The result is that as soon
as the railroads opened an outlet to their
products, the farmers used ihe road to
bring their grain to this common center.
To day instead of haring a town scat
tered and disconnected, it is like a bee
hive, full of life and animation.—
Review.
Willis Sweet, though billed to appear
in the combination on Saturday night,
was not here. He was so busy up North
trying to reconcile those people with the
action of Dubois that he could not leave.
His non appearance was a disappoint
ment, for we all wanted to hear the
crack talker of the Duboisites.—
Democrat.
PottsVILLE, Pa., Oct. 10.— Inform
ation [reached thisj^city to night of a
tcrrible'accident'Jwhichjocrurr il on the
Lehigh Valley railroad, at Mud Run,
tho first station above Penn Haven. A
grand parade of Catholic societies took
place at llazeltou to day, and a largo
excursion was rnn from Wilktabarre
for the occasion, composed of lodges,
bands, and sight-seers from Wiikesbarrc,
Nanticoke, and other poiuts along 'the
fine. The excursion train was run in
two sections, end upon their return trip
to-night the rear section ran into the
forward section at Mud Run, about nine
o'clock, with disastrous results. Several
cars of the forward section were teles
coped, and forty persons were killed
outright and about an equal number
injured, many of them probably fatally.
The late hour at which the accident
occurred, the remote and isolated locality
of the scene, and the reticence of the
railroad people, combine to tender the
obtainment of details extremely difficult.
It is impossible to ascertain the names or
residences of any of the victims, hut
their uumber is stated above with ap
proximate accuracy.
FRIGHTFUL DISASTER OR THE
LEHIGH VALLEY RAILROAD.
The Wheat Maiket.
New York, Oct. 10.—On the wheat
market Ihe Mail and Erpress says :
The feeling before the opening was that
wheat was geing to 31 straight. The
first sale after the gong sounded was
31 lli[for[December, 'a break of 2|e
and the next 31 10i. The bears were
after stop orders, [and caught some, but
were caught themselves. The old bull
clique bad orders in the market to tuke
all tho wheat offering, and sent out
numerous [bully points. The firm baud
of the bulls and the bull points soon
caused a vigorous rush to cover. The
market was bare of wheat, and prices
advanced 4 to 4fc before 1 P. M., with
the old Chicago k Northwestern clique
still in oontrol, breaking rapidly toward
the dose.
Flooa and Destruction in China.
From advices by tho Belgic thi
following is gleaned : Disastrous floods oo
curredin the province of Moukden, abou
35() miles northeast of Pekin, bringing
with it the immediate death of huudrodi
of inhabitants and utter annihilation t<
very muny homes, destruction of cropi
and the prospects of u general tamiuo iu
tho coming winter. The cholera is stil
raging at Hong Kong, The daily aver
age of new cases is from forty to fifty
A stprui on the 30th of August a
Notogan, Japan, caused the followin|
damage : Number of houses damage«
or half destroyed, 8,000 ; vessels totall;
lost!, 85 ; vessels wrecked, 500 ; numbe
of persons wounded, injured and receiv
ing public assistance, 02,000. Th
whole of the new embankment of thi
Ye low river at Chang Chow, began las
autumn, and carried on at the cost o
ovc) £:),(!00,000, has been completel
swept away by the flood. Of the 8,001
lineal teet of river wall recently com
pleted not one inch remains and watet
are pouring through the immense gaj
into Ilonau unchecked. From 800 ti
1,000 laborers, who were on the bank
were drowned.
The FaolUo Rond«.
Washington, Oct. 6. — General
Joseph E. Johnson, commissioner or '
railroads, in his annual report to tho
secretary of the interior, states that the,
railroads south of the Uuion and Central
Pacific and east of California have been
inspected during the year by Hassard,
engineer of tho office. Tho commissioner
iusppcted the Union aud Ceutral Pacifie,
und all roads in California and Oregoa
connected with the latter and thomla
Washington Territory. "These roads,"
the commissioner adds, "are all in « very
satisfactory condition.- They were wall
built originally and have been kept la
excellent order sino*. Steel rails have
b in substituted for iron almost mn
when.
Tacoma is receiving a large portion at
the vfheat raised in Eastern Washington , 1
much larger than «ver Mm.

xml | txt