OCR Interpretation


Lewiston teller. [volume] (Lewiston, North Idaho) 1878-1900, March 21, 1889, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82007023/1889-03-21/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE LEWISTON TELLER
CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIAL PAPER
Çke TELLER hat the largeet circulation 9 }
any paper » North Idaho.
ENTERED at tit Lewùton 1'ott Office
be tecond clau matter.
*HUK8DaY.................MARCH. 21, 1880
Wars and rumors of wars,
Must of our people are in a great state
of suspense in regard to what, ii any
thing, will be done in this section io
furnishing steam transportation to people
daring the year 1889, for Net Perce
nnd Idaho counties. We were told late
last year that tho l'alouse branch
ot tho Northern Pacific would surely be
extended to Lewiston, and thence on to
Camas Prairie in Idaho county, early in
the year 1889, and to this end surveys
were extended over the route with con
siderable of a show ot business, which
gave promise that much would he accom
plished, and that work in grading would
be accomplished, if tho winter was mild,
before spring. But all surveys have
oeasad months ago, and no preparations
Bo far as we can learn, have been made
towards grading on the line. We heard
that the O. R. & N., had fully deter
mined to work on their projected line
over a route to Clearwater at the mouth
Of the Potlatch, thence up the Clear
water either via of Lawyers eauyon, or
the mouth ot Cottonwood, thenee on to
Camas Prairie. Surveys were made in
Lawyers canyon and on to the prairie.
They had before made surveys in the
Potlatch country and down tho potlatch
as far as Clearwater, and a line was par
tially surveyed towards Lewiston. These
surveys were discontinued months ago
nnd the surveyors were called home, for
what reason it was not known to the
pnblio generally, and no evidenoe left to
indicate that they would be resumed.
The Idaho Transit started in last season
to survey a line, by way of Craig's
mountain, to Camas Prairie south of the
reservation and proceeded about twenty
fivo miles to the base of the mountain
near Waha lake, then they were called
off, on account of forbidding cold weath
er and prospect of snow on the moun
tain portion of the route, although no
very cold weather nor but little snow has
appeared to obstruct work to any serious
extent during the winter. We are often
told that combinations and agreements
have been entered into between the
managers of the companies, which will
prevent any extensions of these road«
the coming working season, and then
again we are told that no combination or
contract has been formed that will delay
the building of one or more of these
roads the coming season. But no officer
or manager of these companies pretends
to know when work will commence to
inspire any faith in the eonsumation of
the building of any of these roads before
the oloeo of 1889. The managers of
these roads do not give the producers and
freighters any definite understanding
when they will be ready to carry off any
surplus products of the country, and
henoe the producers do not know how
much seed to put in, nor when to buy
grain with nny certainty of getting it to
market when it will be in demand at
living price. This uncertainty operates
greatly to the disadvantage of the shipper.
It is said that all this uncertainty is due
to the strife of the different oompanies
for advantage in routes. The produoer
bad freighter has ultimately to pay for
all this strife. If the roads were built
and in operation and their strife was to
secure freight, the chances would be
favorable for low freights, which would
redound to the advantage of the producer
and ireighter. There should be n oon
sidération mutual between transportation
men and producers and freighters of a
Country. _
Our neighbor of the Free Press ex
presses a peculiarly unfriendly feeling
towards the Lewiston publishes when be
Wishes, ''Our citisens would consolidate
the two papers, put the material of both
into one building and then set fire to the
building." We can't understand the
animus of the man who should desire to
visit upon co temporaries so direful a
calamity. He may envy our situation.
Ho once or twice trod our path and we
always treated him with beooming
oonrtesy, and why he should pray for
our combustion to ashes, is incompre
hensible. There is something cynical in
his make up.
Our Elk City correspondent calls at
tention to a class ot eases about the prior
right of oooupants of the public lands
where no surveys have been made and
where lands have been made open to set
tlement. We understand the general
rule to be that the first bona fide settler
and occupant can select -bis land and the
next man must recognise his right till
the government surveys are plaited in
the land office so that be can file upon it.
But he must show fidelity in continuing
bis settlement the same as be would
Could he file upon it. The land officers
in the district can inform him of the steps
lie must take to preserve his rights un
-Interbed and intact.
A LECTURE ON Alt ARCH1&M.
Judge GrinneU Thinks the Name of
Chicago Has Been Unjustly
Maligned.
Chicago, March 15.—A large aud
ience at the Kenwood Club rooms to
night listened to a paper on "Socialism
in America" by Judge Giinnell, who
was Btate attorney in the famous anarchist
trial.
Judge Grinnell said in part: "The
eager desire of party leaders to obtain and
retain office keeps socialism and its at
tendant evils alive. In Chicago anar
chism is exaggerated out of all propor
tion to its power, for one good purpose,
and some members of both political
parties seem inclined to act so as to catch
this element.
"In my opinion the talk about the
anarchists during the past winter has
been a willful and wicked exagération of
their power, and an injury to the fair
name of Chicago, and a serious detri
ment to its business interests, and I con
fidently believe the purpose of such ex
aggeration was purely political."
"Anarchy, as an organisation, is dead
in America. Its advocates have resolved
themselves back into their former state,
or parentage, namely 'socialism.' Yan
kee law bas terrified them. But we can
not with tho same case brush aside the
socialists. This can only be avoided by
returning to the fundamental principles
of our government, eschewing paterna
lism and dass legislation."
Judge Grinnoll, who is a democrat,
then went on to argue that the protec
tion principles were wrong, that, they
fostered and encouraged sooialiam, and
were in fact socialism, and that with its
absolute abolishment and a return to
tariff for revenue only, the socialist
would die aud his doctriue disappear.
Auckland, Maroh 14.—Advices just
received fiom Samoa show that there
was no causes for tho sensational rumors
of an engagement between the Nipsi
and German oorvette Olga. Far from
this, the German officials in the islands
have given up their aggressive policy.
The proclamation of martial law has
been withdrawn, and the Germans have
abandoned all claim to the right of
searching incoming vessels for contrao
acd of war. Bo! h of these steps have
met with the hearty approval of all
foreign residents at Apiu, and have had
a quieting effect. Unusual tranquillity
prevails throughout the island. Mataafa
however, has a force of troops, estimated
to be 6,000 strong. Tamasese's army
consists of about 7,000 men. The men
of war of both'the Germans and Ameri
cans still remain at Apia, ready for any
emergency that may arise.
Mr. Hartley, recently from Chicago,
and one of the owners of tho Democrat
mine near Pierce City, left on Monday
for the purpose of operating upon the
mine. Mr. Poonay, who, with others
run and completed a tunnel about 600
feet in length last winter, and tapped the
ledge at a good depth. They have
mill on the ground and already set up,
and Ponnay says it can be in readiness
to operate in a week's time, after they
get into camp. They have plenty of ore
in sight and th-y hope to make a killing
this summer in taking out gold. The
ore is fair pay ore and all gold, and with
steady work the prospect is sufficient to
warrant a profitable season. There are
other ledges near by that promise well
when opened. Mr. Hartley we met in
Florence in 1862, who was then
partner of Jacob Weiser, mining
Babboon gulch, where much money was
taken out by the firm. Since then
Hartley has spent much of bis time in
Chicago, and been engaged in handling
wheat, and report says he has made con
siderable money, and till now he has left
mining alone. He will remain at his
mine for two or three months, till every
thing is moving on prosperously, and
then entrust its operation to others, and
return to Chicago, where is his principal
field of operations.
be
be
To the emigrants who aro coming
nto Washington and North Idaho, we
would say that the lands in North Idaho
cannot be excelled by any in Washingtsn
for wheat raising, or fruit raising, or for
graxing stock, while tho winters are open
for stock during all the season, save oc
casionally there may be a winter where
the snow may cover the ground for a per
iod of from OU6 to four or five weeks,
but of not sufficient depth to prevent
stock from gathering the grass to supply
them by pawing through the snow.
This is usually the case in all the rallies
in North Idaho.
Engineer Nichols is stopping fur the
present at Pulouse City in waiting for
orders to commence the work of straight
ening his surveyed line from Brannan
Station ts the Clearwator, preparatory
to the work of grading. It is expected
that before the 20th of April the work
of grading will be commenced. This is
the latest report.
A good lot of dry cord wood for sale
cheap. Enquire ofB. Uiuuard. 2iif
a
U
FROM ELK CITY.
Elk City, March 13, 1889.
Editor Tellkr : Miners sod pros
peotorj sre beginning to come into this
esmp on foot, there being shout ten miles
of snow, which is yet impassible for
horses, without s little shoveling. But
the indications are that the trail will be
opened two months earlier thin usual.
Thera is very little snow about the mines,
which will make placer mining s slim
business Ibis summer, as many get only
six weeks or two mouths run of water in
good seasons. But a dry season will
will enable prospectors and ledge miners
to sink to better advantage, as water is
rather too apt to interfere with sinking
in bedrock.
I write this more to gain information
(ban to give, and I will proceed to ex
plain. There are scattered through
these mountains many spots of meadow
land, where the wild hay grows in great
luxuriance. About the mines there are
mauy such meadows, where from forty
to one hundred and sixty acres can be
located. A few old timers bave fenced
some places, and kept cattle and horses.
But, of course, there ha've been
surveys, and the land cannot tie filed on
Those desiring to utilise the bay lands
have trouble in bolding the same, as
others seem to think there is no law by
which these stock men can hold the hay
for feed for their stock during the long,
snowy winter. Now, can you give us
any information as to what can be done
in the matter? These meadows are un
derstood as having no paying mines upon
them, and nobody wants them for mining
purposes. The trouble is, one man runs
off, approximately, 160 acres, and an
other man cuts off a portion of it, and
endeavors, by recording with the mining
recorder, to hold against the prior
aqua; ter. Will you pleas« to give us
information as to how a man can legally
hold 160 acres, against the trespasses ol
others. Will recording hold the laud?
Or will staking or fencicg do the same?
jf these old timers, who have had a few
head of cattle and horses here for many
years, and made butter for the miners,
are to be robbed of the hay, they will be
compelled to quit.
I wrote you from Grangcville, pre
viously, in which I attempted to give a
little information concerning the town
but I made a very serious omission
which I desire to oorrect. I clear lorgot
to remember that there was a newspaper
published in Grangeville. The Hon
(to be) A. F. Parker, is the genial and
gifted manipulator of the Free Press,
and it does credit to his talent and to the
community. Bro. Parker will excuse
the dereliction and accept the assurance
that I am willing to make the amende
honorable, even to the extent of sup
porting him, should he ever aspire to
climb up the ladder of fame by runuing
for some small office. Yours ete.,
G. C,
The Contmot Has Been Let.
The contract for the twenty-five grain
elevators, which it was announced in the
Oregonian , some time einoe, were to be
built along the lines of the O. R. <fc N
Co., in Eastern Oregon and Washington
this summer, has been by the Pacifie
Coast Elevator Company to Messrs.
Simpson & Robinson, of Minneapolis,
who have had large experience in build
ing elevators,
Mr. Robinson is now here making
arrangements for beginning work, and
will have seventy carloads of lumber
delivered in s tew days at Latah.
Truax, Oakesdale and Farmington, for
the elevators at those plaoes, which will
be tbe first to be built. A large lot of
machinery for these elevators was shipped
from Minneapolis some days since.
There need be no further doubt
regard to the oompsny completing its
system of elevators here.— Oregonian.
of
There are a large number of "place'
seekers in Idaho under the present Ad
ministration, and while none of them may
be considered "fat takes" they sre never
theless considered a little better than
honest work with drill, pick and shovel,
homy hands and stained clothes. The
Governor of Idaho receives $2,600 per
annum; the Secretary of the Territory,
1800; the Boise City Postmaster, $2,000;
the Eagle Rock Postmaster, $1,150; the
Bell vue Postmaster, $1.000; the Hailey
Postmaster, $1,400; the Ketcbum Post
master, $1,100; the Lewiston Postmaster,
$1,400; the Moscow Postmaster, $1,000;
the Murray Postmaster, $1,000; Chief
Justice and two Associate Judges, $3,000
each; U. S. Attorney, $250 and fees; Mar
shal, $250 and fees; Surveyor General,
2,500. All things considered tbe Gover
norship is the fattest office. He has
soaroely anything to do but to make out
an annual report to the Secretory of tbe
Interior and appoint a few notaries. A
little over $200 a month for doing noth
ing and appearing wise is good pay
where intelligent miners only get $3.50
a day.— Sun.
Golden Harrest Cask Stove iejuet as good as
U looks. Colombie, Harvest, Occident, Dexter,
Wide.West and an endless variety ot parler
and effioe stores of eastern patterns at Bun
nail s hardware store. |
is
There are many men, residents in this
territory, who have gone to Washington,
D. C., since Harrison's election. Some
for the purpose of witnessing the in
auguration ceremonies, which were
expectedto out do any similar event, for
many years, if not out do all the in
augurations since the dsys of Washing
ton. Seme have gone with the avowed
purpose of seeking some office from tbe
hands of the new president. If such
are competent it is commendable in
them, and no man will surely censure
them. Some have gene entirely on
other business without any desire for
office of any kind. And yet some med
dlesome newspapers construe their visit
ing Washington at this time as sure
evidence that they are to seek office, and
so publish them to the world for the
purpose ot misrepresenting them to their
friends aud acquaintances, regardiez of
the good or injury it may do them.
Suoh a meddlesome and lying spirit, and
practiced in any publisher, is contempt
able, and with good and upright men,
of ail class, will bo so considered, and
such writers are but mounte banks.
BORN.
VERNON.—Near this city to the wife of
John Vernon, a daughter, March 18,
1889.
NEW TO-DAY.
ffiiuolulion Notice.
Notice ia hereby given that we the under
•igned oo-parteera, known ta the firm of
Beeefiel A Korner, doing stook buaieeaa in
Nea Perea end Idaho eauntiea, we* diaaolred
an tba first day or Maroh, 1888, and that all
dabta against the firm will be settled by B. D
Kerner. O. P. BENEFIEL,
B. D. KORNER.
Maroh 16th., 1889, 26-3w
NOTICE FOR HOMESTEAD PROOF.
HENRY K. FOUNTAIN—hd 888.
LAND OFF1CI AT
Lewliton, I. T. Maroh 16, 1888.
N otice is hereby given that the
following named settler has filed notice
of his intentian to make final proof in support
of hia elaim and that aaid proof will ha mads
at thia office, on April 26, 1889, via: Henry
K. Fountain for the nwlg eeo32 tp 85 n r 4w,
B. M. He nates the following witnesses ta
prove hia continuous residence upon, and cal
tirntion of said land, via; Joel D. Martin,
Jacob L. Goodnight, John Denny and John
Pouting nil of Lewiston, Idaho.
Any poraan who desires to protest egainit
the allowance ef inch proof, or who knows of
any substentinl reason, under the law nnd
regulation! of the fnterior Department, why
snoh proof should not be allowed, will be given
en opportunity at tbe above mentioned time
and place to orosa esatainc tho witnesssa ef
aaid olaimant, and ta offer evidenoe in rebut
tal ef that submitted by claimant.
FRANCIS F. PATTERSON.
28 Register.
NOTICE,
COUNTY warrants registered before the 24
of Jan. 1887. also the .following ones on that
day. Nos. 92. 135, 105,136, 98, 102, 61. «0
52, 58, 118, 56, 73, will be paid on présenta*
tion at tbe county treasurer's office. Interest
on above deaoribed warrants will oease after
this date. OEO. GLASS,
Treasurer of Nos Perce Caucty, I. T.
Lewiston, 1. T., Maroh 11. 1889. 24 3W
FOR SALE.
ONE huudred and twenty aeres of good
land for rale at publio auetion, at the premises
on Saturday March 23, 1888, will be sold to
the highest bidder for cash. Land situated
one-half mile above tbe Junotion, en Lapwai
road. D. S HUTCHINS.
24-2 Lewiatnn P. O., Idaho.
NOTICE FOR HOMESTEAD PROOF.
Charlea E. Faunes— Hd 1896.
Land Offioe at Lewiston, Idaho,
Maroh 13th. 1889
N etioe ia hereby given that tbe following
named settler has filed notiee of his inten
tion to make final proof in support of his elnim
and that said proof will be made at thia effioe.
on April 22nd, 1889, vii; Charles E Fannoe
for the s', swig nwtg iwk and aw hi aw
section 9 Tp 33 nr 4 W B M.
He names the following witneues to prove
his continueua residenee upon nnd enltivation
of, said land, via: Frank Ward, Joseph Bart
lett, William L. Parker, William B. Cooper
all of Lewiston, Idaho.
Any person who desires to protest against
the allowance of aeeh proof, or who knowa of
any substantial reason, under tbe law and the
regulations of tha Interior Department, why
eneh proof abould not be allowed, will ho
given an opportunity at the above mentioned
time and place to.oroas examine the witnesses
of said olaimant, and to offer evidence ia re
buttal of that submitted by olaimant.
FRANCIS F. PATTERSON,
24 Register.
NOTICE FOR HOMESTEAD PROOF.
Tiodose Sotelo, deceased—Hd 1619.
Land Office at Lewiston, Idaho,
March 6th, 1889
N etioe is hereby giren that the following
named settler has filed netioe of hia inten
tion to make final proof In aupport of his elaim,
end that said proof will be made at this effioe,
en April 19th, 1889, via: Ramon Mena, de
visee of Tiodose Sotelo, for the sH aw la and
ek swii section 10 tp 35 nr 5 W. B. M.
lie names tbe following witneesos to pnve
hie oontinoue rceidenoe upon nnd enltivation
of, said land, vis: William Sigler, George
Sigler, Joeieh Englia and W. A. Dent, all of
Lewiaten, Idaho.
Any parson who desires to protest against
tha alio wince of snoh proof, or who knowa of
any substantial reneen. under the Uw and the
regulations of the Interior Department, why
•uch proof abould not be allowed, will be given
an opportunity at the above mentioned time
and place to croai-examine the witness« of
said olaimant, and to offer eridenoe in rebuttal
of that submitted by otamant.
FRANCIS F. PATTERSON,
^ _ Register.
NOTICE FOR PRE BMPTION PROOF. "
FREDERICK WHEATCROFT. pro d • *94«
LAND OFFICE AT
Lewiston, Idaho, March lat, 1 SS 9
N otiee ia hereby giren that tbe fellowinx
named settler has filed notiee ef his in
tention to make final proof in support of his
claim, and that said proof will be made at
thu office, an April 15. 1889. vii : Frederick
Wheatcroft for the swii nwb.nt* .wig and
nwia eel* see 24 tp 35 a r 6 w B. M. H .
nemee the fnllewing witnesses to prove hia
centtnueus residence open nnd oultiration of
said land, vii : Aaron !.. Foredyee, William
II. Foredyee. Michael Hatten und Charles U
Baker, all of Lewiatun, I<Uho.
Any person who desire« te proteet against
the allewaaoe of eneh proof, or who knows of
nny substantial reason, under the law and the
regulations of tho Interior Department whv
such proof ebonld not be allowed, will be
giren en opportunity at the above mentioned
ime end plaee to cross examine tbe witnesses
of said claimant, and to offer eridenoeln
rebuttal of that submitted by claimant.
FRANCIS F. PATTERSON,
21 Register.
E. B. Whitcomb, C. E. Whitcomb, Luther B.
Goble, ail ef Lewiston, Idaho.
MOSCOW.
JULIETTA.
Don't Miss It!
GOLDEN OFFORTUNITY
MAKE MOW El!
HOW? SAVE
t&
IT
MERCHANDISE STORE
at—JULIETTA, I. T.-are
CLOSING OUT
Their Fall and Winter Stock, consisting of OVER
COATS, SUITS, WOOLEN GOODS, FLANNELS,,
ROOTS, HATS, Etc., to make room for their
MAMMOTH SPRING STOCK
now being purchased in the E a st.
Our prices tell, and very body tells of our prices
Julietta, I. T.
^Highest Cash Price Paid for Grain,
EVERYTHING NSW!
Bd&XETT
- CARRIES A FULL LINE OF —
S 11 SH 1 S 1 S 1 .
GENT
FURNISHING GOODS.
AND:
Fine Tailor-Made
CLOTHING
—ALSO A COMPLETE STOCK OF—
BÄDIB0* FURYtlgsiflS 0OOD0
KID shoes" and Mi88e ' Fin ° FRENCH
L. ROWLEY,
PLANING
ILL
Moulding, Door, Sash Ac Scroll Saw*
ing, Etc,
All work in his line made to order at prices that defy com
crj " priM8 *• ■* tb. cä
41
CHAS. C. KRESS,
SOLID SILVER AND
(SILVER-PLATED WAR!
""KÄscr"'
CLOCKS KNOiOPTICKL GOODS
Repairing at W a tehee and Jewelry t epeeialty
E 8 TKAY
in Sept. ÎKfi, one'brewn'h' l"* 1 ' Preel»«
•»«.(jo. the TeftX" ^«d.»
years eld and will weirh .k. h " r ' e is
penadi. The owner will pleas*« nV*** tun ' | r«i
pny charges end take him . W \' P Ve P r °I*rty
««^.Id.he.FVh 8 ^^'
22 tw
STALLION FÔRsÂïjn
Wff Will null__ "■I
Dark Bay SteUton ^nfne f ",° th V ' to< * «n«
banda high, «Ul woigh B old ' 'ixtee*
further particular, add?,,. ™ puun<1 »- For
28-3w
SUEPLEU BROS
i BDlOriin T1
amerun, M ab
STOCK
SALE
Call an or addresa * ' i;h ' nir lw "> *
24.5
Kooklord, y. y
a
a
æ
O
2
«•
H
Ü
!►
a
w
a
%
a
®
0
1
B
o
cL
W
o
0
»
go
H
o
£
Ö
»
*5
p
0
<
CD
"T
-n
CD
CD
CL
3
Q.
0)
£L
CD
CO
«-fr
ÇT
CD
M
o
o
t*
t*
§
FEED
STABLE
-AND,—*—,
CORRAL*
OPPOSITE THE HOTEL DE FRAN
Animals kept
at a reasonable price
and a good corrall for camping
Water handy;
"GET THERE"
If you want good Satisfaction
M. L. SMITH. 25
O. R & N.
E X C H A N G
IF YOU WANT A
E.
NICE DRINK
-ORA
GOOD CIGjAR, !
Stop into the O. It. » N. Exchange sale
ea Main Street. agtf
BANK OF LEWXSTOS
John Burke, Banker
Transact« t General Banking Buiiae
AÆO3STE7STT0 LOAI
OAT LONG OR SHORT TIMS..
GENERAL INSURANCEAGEHC1
Higheit eneh priee paid for Wheat und Barle
Cattle Bought and Sold.
Main Street - - Lewiston, Idol
CALIFORNIA
BREWERY
SEAM HEAD Of FIRST ST.,
WZXSGERBER BROS, Pro]
LNWI8T0N, 1. 1.
Sill AND SMR US- 1 I
W- A. SIMPSON
Gn eeeeeer to Andrew Raex)
BARBER and RAIRDRESSE
The first-class Shop of the cit
HOT and COLD BATHS.
MAIN 8 T - . LEWI 8 TQ
IfiOAm

xml | txt