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Lewiston teller. [volume] (Lewiston, North Idaho) 1878-1900, December 07, 1898, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82007023/1898-12-07/ed-1/seq-2/

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Th ewist^H Teller.
C /
1
'ublishcr.
orksm;
------ •— — ------- - — ~
fintered at the IiCvviston Postoffice on
application as «econo class mail matter
------------- - " ------- .~rr~'
Cue year, in advance.................... 2-50
gs ......... ■.... r=r .
Hetter country roads and better'
public streets are crying
the day.
needs of
More houses and cheaper public
service would promote I.ewiston's
growth.
O, for u political policy that will
regulate ability to buy a dinner to
suit the demands of appetite.
The best financial policy is the
policy that promotes the produc
lion of the wealth of the farms,
mines and factories.
Tlie spites aod jealousies of
navy
1C
officers of the array and nav> ***" i
wea ving the woof of the crape
will drape erstwhile heroes be or
the histones of the Spanish wnr ,h i
®' ri,len - _____
The soils and the mines of the
Clearwater basin have been
^
cumulating wealth during all the
past centuries. The epoch of dis
tribution is now at bond and the
world claims its heritage. I
I jj.-——- '
Senator <juay and Governor
Tanner have both been indicted on
grave criminel charges
within the
past mouth. It is a healthful po-j
litlcal symptom when the courts j
disregard rank in the administra- ]
tiou of the legal remedies of crime. '
• •mm w — '■< » !'■ j
The hulders of city franchises J
should be restrained in the interest j
ofthc puhlfo, to the last letter of
Ibe contract. A franchise granted j
without a consideration is void !
and should t>e revoked, and an
individual or corporation which
disregards the considerations' for- j
frits all rights.
„ . ,
It the comment ot the state press -
. ,. .. I
is a guide to public seutiract! the :
*. * , , . , .
organization ot the state legislat- j
, , . * , ,ia
orr Is the most important work oi
. . „ .
that body. Organization covers
J . . .
the whole question of apppointive ,
pay roll. The boodle attracts
purely legislation needs
commonwealth.
of
Jb >
;
;
1
The question of frie homes
the reservation settlers is an
s tor
i
of the gre itest lcu-al interest.
well informell public man believes '
for a momeut that the injustice
payment for public lands will be j
enforced against tin ]>eople hut
the suspense Is in* »Uerable. The
exaction of pay foi ( ublic domain
from actual home builders would
he a violation of long established
przvedent. Alt that is necessary
to secure free lauds for our new
citizens is to get the case out of
politics and have it presented on
its merits; aud thus we can demand
our eqmtees.
• **
The ennui (>f the life ol the
volnuteersin Manila is more try
ing upon the coble spirit of man-1
hood than active warfare would lie.
tl is the doty of the government
to replace the volunteers by regu
iars. The camp life of the regular
soldier is not distasteful to theordi
tiary soldier of ihe regular army
while it is very trying upon the
high spirited young man who is
, ,, , , ,, , . .. .
»Hipel.tHl by noble patriotism to go
, r , . .
to the deicnee ot his country in
time of war. Many of the most
energetic young nun of the
country enlisted to fight the battles
lot humanity and liberty against
tyranical Spain. Every energy
that caused the enlistment in emer
gency unfits the volunteers for the
trials that beset them in Manila
From a political standpoint, from
a humanitarian standpoint the war
fosue of the present -lay is the ex
Change of the volunteer army con
guest for a regular army of occu
patiou.
"Grand Old Nez. Perce" seems
to have first realized her granduer
Since the Novenilierelection. That
event was the inaugural bles-ring
©f this season of blessings.
have at hand an instance of re
publican prosperity. Niz Perce is
»holly republican for the first time
io her histofy and she see- ms to lie
recognized for the first time in the
trot aenst of her inifortauce. We
have not homes c-ncugh lo sheltei
the people since the date of last
election. We have not business p
bouses enough to meet the de
man(ls of commerce; we have not
ark et
real estate enough on the ma
to meet the needs of home seekers;
we are talked about in every quar
ter of the globe, and half a dozen
railroads are heading toward the
valley Which railroads shunned be
f< .re Surely "grapd old Ncz
Perces ' has realized her grandeur
since the November election.
The Clearwater basin
watched with solicitiou
the promoters of railroads in the
Northwest for ninny years and dur
ing all that time the people worried
ms been
eyes by
and wondered over their seething
neglect. Themen who hold the
.
struggle for territorial advantages.
destitues of this district 1u their
hands were all the time fearful ol
the result of the clash of interests to
which is manifest in the present
The traffic of this district was
known during the period of sus
pense to he a rich prize and each
of several systems was scheming to
capture the field by some strategic
n|oye> But like the flow of a river
reetrajn< , d temporarily it was ot ,i y
a matter 0 f t , me till the accumu-1
dating wealth would hurst the ob
éructions. The Clearwater basin i
could not he held hack any longer, j
dke the flood of a river
the barriers and the flood will flow
outward to the sea, to be restrained
no more.
---------------
the com
mercial demands have now burst
The general prosperity that pre
vails in the farming community is
liable to relax business energies,
The wheat crops of this year and
last have been exceptionally profit
able. This condition has a tend
an :y to direct efforts into the sin
gle channel of cereal production,
In this general policy lies the dan
get of western agriculture. The ,
markets for wheat have worldwide ;
dependencies, and are beyond local '
control. The wheat business is j
delusive; its hazzards multiply
with the centralization of comnwr- ;
jetai interests. The local markets
.should he instructive guides to
the agriculturalists. The products
- , ., . . ;
I of the farm are convertab'.e into
:
manv forms. The farm should he ,
j ^ ......... „„ „
,ia factory us well as a hars
\\ heat should be couver

butter, eggs aud meat as well as
, ^ ^ ^ tQ be made im()
^ for forejgn Uade
est field,
rucl lino
The farm
jers can maintain a balance in the
; markets by conservative busine
; methods of converting cheap
1 into the various commodities
. 1
»P grain,
«ties of
agricul
commerce. The key to agricul-'for
i tarai success is diversified farming.
No----
' The democralic press in these '
lime , of progress ^'ms to he an
j >ren|l for inteHectual acrobatics
<
The Spanish war lias not only ex
i ne OjJduiMi w«n UM tivrt
panded oui territorv hut the results;eluome
have broadened our policies. The ,
democrats have built new plat- i
forms to bridge over every imagin-,
ary chasm in their groping to block
the progress of administration. !
They have themselves fallen|
through the defective planks of ;
their own policy at every progrès- !
sive step No power on earth can j
nullify the plehiscitum that en-,
forces expansion tinder the fateful
conditions of the present. The
plank of democtalic policy against j
expansion had to be removed he
Tore it was fairly framed. They
' replaced this plank with one after
| another, each to lie crushed in re
turn by the wheel of progress,
The democratic party has displayed
in years past formidable strength
; in the upning-fight policy of op
. , , . , .. •
posing the government hut true
r . .ill
: era of progress «ias run the old
party down before it rallied any
-uisderable force on a single
plank of its new platform
The contraband whiskey
traffic.
government in the sense of re
Mj-Jcted citizenship. Perhaps no
, _ .
with the Iudiaus of the Northwest
is a problem of local importance
which presents peculiar phases,
1 he laws of state and nation pro
liibit the sale of intoxicating drinks.
to Indians who are wards of tlie
the sense of re
statute of jurisprudence is sup
ported by a more unanimous seiiti
ment than this one,and yet it is not
efficiently restrained The penal
ties are very severe aud the officers
are vigilant, but the crime is }n-r
We.petuated in the face of all practical
safe guards. The penalties for the
is sale of whiskey lo Indians are very
severe.This fact may interfere with
the enforcement of the laws to
1 some extent. If the sale of a hot
; tie of whiskey could he made a
simple misdemeanor with an ade
quale penalty which could be itn
.sed by a primary court the crime
could be more effectively re
str.iuad. The existing statutes
are largely in operatirv from the
very fact of the severity of the pen- 1
allies imposed and from the fact
Uiat courts of jurisdiction are far
removed from the people chiefly
interested. If simple processes of
detection and trial could he pro-.
vided this serious menace of the
peace of many communities could
be effectively controlled. Under
existing regulations of the depart
tuent ofjustice there is no provision
for an effective constabulary to
meet the exigencies of the case.
■■ I " ■'
Some practical pavement ex- ;
i«riuieuts were undertaken by the
city council in Main street last
spring. It would now he in oruer
to gather expert evidence of the
results. Sections of this street
were paved with gravel. These
short sections are tests only of the
strength and durability of the ma
teriai used- The mud is natural
condition of the wear of street
It is present in proportion j
traffic. ». ... j
to the life of every city. The first ;
requisite of this city is a base for a ■
durable road bed, then will come j
drainage aud a practical means of |
disposition of the mud accumla
tion. Every city is called upon to :
meet these conditions. The wear !
of a year of traffic would make an
insufferable slush on a granite
pavement it the slush could not he ;
removed. The cement gravel on
the streets of this city tortus a
roadbed as hard as granite. If the
requi.-ite contour can be attained
and drainage can he provided Lew
iston will have streets as nearly
perfect as can lie found anywhere.
The test to b e applied to determine
te value of the paving material
used in the experiments of last
summer is simply a test of capacity
for maintaining the weight of
horses and wagons and of dura
bility. That these qualities are
demonstrated seems apparent to
the casual observer. If this pave
ment is practical a thorongh sys-,
tern of paving the principal streets
should be iuaugurated nt once.
The winter season is best for this'
, ;
public work. It is public economy
1
\o afford labor to our citizens who
........ . o..,i_________...
are necessarily idle during a month
j >
or two in mid-winter. Ihe mud [
will bean advantage in building !
gravel pavement as it affords a !
mortar bed for the foundation i
stones.
;
j
i
One of the highest endorsements ;
of Uu . claira 0 f lhe Lewiston valley :
for distinction is the statement
distinction is the statement
froin Pro f. H. E. Van Damen former 1
pomologist of the government that,'
the f,nits from this section were j
the verv best at the Omaha fair. !
the very besVat the Omaha fair>
Prof. Vau Damen is the best au
thority on this subject. i
J J .
kickers often sneer at * be j
Lewiston valley fruit. 1 he claim
by an Humble eit.zen that it ranks j
with any m the world is often;
ridiculed. There is, however,:'
hardly a well informed man to
found who will put his judgment
up against Prof. Van Damen on a
general comparison. This latest :
coroboration !
high endorsement is a
of the statement made by the.
pouiologist of the present admlnis- i
Dation. This distinguished gcu .,
tleman visited Leu istou valley in
October. He said our fruits were
the best in the world. He sug . ]
gested the idea that the govern
ment would take an active interest
in experiments in this valley as
soon as the fact of c»or special
j features of soil and climate could
be recognized through official
•• , , ,
t, 0B rce. He believed the govern
. ;
nient would want to cairy on ex-;
tensive gardens and orchards here
under official suoervisiou. He
here that would cost millions under
mere unfavorable
little valley in
production of finit specialties!
.... , , . , ,
said direct results coltlcl be attained
conditions
tmAI - , . . ,
lhesc statemeuts from world wide
UJLU13 (I Jill V< Ol lu n I'.IL
give special value to '
ids of the Lewiston val- !
authorities
the fruit lands u> ...v
ley. 1 ne best in tue world! Did .
you ever pause to consider what
that condition means. The best
little valley in lhe woild for the
j t '
means thousands of dollars for
sary to establish the fact that Lew
acres of Lewiston valley Irnit lauds.
Fruit growing is the highest order ;
of farming. The best fruit like
I He* Iw* I wine i«s ilwn t* nrit'e Thfr
int me a XUL P rKt ** *
finest box of fruit in the market of
Eton valley fruit possessed quali
ties given it by Prof. Vau Damen
an undisputed authority to make
• nv ri*v YVoll'd htf worth Its weicht
. L! > « 11,1
in ar.-ii !r wollld Olll v lx? Ilt-ces
111 feoui. v\oiiiU uiiij 1 *. Mhtca
every acre of orchard in the valley
woitli five thousaud dollars.
vjy the prosecution o/ the war
and the triumphant
with Spar
tre*y of pface the administration
won the unqualified approbation
of the Amer'fc;^ p<mgle The ac
qnisition of lernt«fPwas a natural
condition of the events that pre
ceded the w*r*wHRe victories of
Nothing less
and the
our army and na
than the frtedoi
retention ot Puerto the
Philippines would IfiwS^tisfied
the public. These events have
made the McKinley administration
very populir. The feeble voices
of censure have been drowned by
applause. The exuberance of
patriotism permitted no close
scrutiny of methods or future
probabilities. It was easy going
with the popular tide while the en
thusiasm of success prevailed; but
now the time has come for wise
statesmanship. The time for the
application of the cold science of
government is at hand. The cou
trol of colonies is in the first place
not compatable with the fuuda
mental principles of our govern
ment; but the colonies have come
to us not as the result of deliberate
policy, they are ours as the result
of a condition thrust upon this
republic. The colonies ere ours
auü by the edict of public sentiment
we must retain them and the other
conditions follow. We must govern
them. Humanity demands at our
hands the civilization of our islaud
possessions We must secure for
them constitutional liberty, we
must provide a broad commercial
policy, a financial system and edti
cational facilities. All of this calls
for a radical departure from the
policies that have been regarded
the fixed principles of republican-__
ism. To successfully meet pressing
demands the present administra
tion, which has risen and now
stands at the height of popular
esteem, must exercise the wisest
possible statesmanship. An eruer
geucy exists, a cricis is immiueut
The statesman of the day who sue-,
cessfully meets the issues will be a
hero of history. Can McKinley
rise to this occasion? If so another
star
will adorn
American heroes.
the galaxy
of
~,
There are too mativ pessimists tn
1
the world. It is quite too common
M
for man to look at the dark side of
life, to see the spots ou the sun
'
field - aud to rcmetuber on, y the
cokl or ^lly days of all the year
the fertile
that is more lhan half fair. The
chronic kicker is found in the Lew
ictnn vnllf-Y- Whilf thf> snow lao«
lblon valIe > ' wnue tne snow tap.
over lhe rirarock * m,le flwa >' wh,le :
the blizzards rage in the middle ■
West destructive storms rage i
n ^ ie Fas. the chronic kic -er
howls about the mud or the wind i
or frost m the Lewiston valley,
howls about the mud or the wind
r tbe frost in the U ' wist ' jn valley
While the winter that blights all
life n igus relentlessly all aroum ,
'the enn U'arm l the C»rass to ereen
v , d j J weet
« valley . A „ 1
£ while only
> ' > !
' " ; ;
Ixri^ T , h ^ " a ° would j
rath f «« st tbe free ^
1 ® ^ ar ' ah e
^ V.niv tha Lrwoubl rather
ton '**"*•}» man would rainer
i 111!1 S OT
diromc kicker. The ordinary man
have snow than mud. It is any
complaiut with the
enron.c xicxe,. . z ..c »,uu.a.y ma«
foag« for the conditions ot his
youthful better days when me was
] buoyant even u> adversUy. K,c ' c '
mg is the resort ol the man woo
suffers physical degeneracy He,
»ongs for the vanished^,o>s of >outh
' u were ns iap
ptest days. Because Lewiston val
sunshine does not warm t e
sordid hearts of every disappointed
tr „ r i.
; adventurer me xi-Ker 1 » ever
present in our midst. The condition
which causes complaint about our
climate is the same that makes a
tTuin believe the sour seedling
. .. ' u A
tpples Ul hl« grandfathers orchard
were better than the fine pippins
ot the Lewiston yallev, that makes
. . ... . .. J .. .
him think the sour grapes that
- -
UllO IU 111 a me .TZUI ill'll
' grew wild in the old wood lot were
! muscats and

. àees anf) (p C r woman as pretty as
the sweetheart of his youth be
cause his old heart beats sluggish
HOW ; he never finds fruit as
' luscious because his sense of taste
is vitiated, nor does he fiud
another climate that is as perfect
as that of his youthful home.
; ~ : — - ------------———
CONTEST NOTICE.
IVpjnmcni of the Interior. Unit*3 L411J
0«ci. Uwiti on, Idaho. Nov. 24. 1898.
A sufficient content *«.4* vu having been tiled In
thin (Mce by Geo r ge A. Hv«rcsi contestant,
»gainkt Charlet F.. Pitcher jr. entry No, 2811. made
June 10. 1892.for n«H *ac 19. township 32 n.
range l w, by Ch«n#9 E. P»tch«r jr. conte»t««. in
which it is atlcföd that: «aid Charles E. Pitcher )r
hss wholly .tkai'.ioned hi© said homestead and haa
failed to cultivate same according to law, said pai •
neb xi* h./ei-v notifieJ to appear, respond and offer
evidence tuuciitofr said allegation at 10 o'clock a m
on January U. b^foielbo Hegister and Receiver
at ihe United State> l and Office iB Lewiston. Idaho.
after due diligence, personal service of this notice
car. mi be made, it is hereby ordered and dinictad
thsx such notice be pven by due and proper publica
Chauler H GAJtBY. Recaiver,
Bridge
Piers
Are now
Building.
Vineland
Prices
will again
Be advanced
in the near future.
Why
Pay
Rent?
$ loo.oo
will buy
a good lot, and
#500.00, to lie obtaine d
on easy terras,
will build a
good house in
Vineland,
within a
half mile of Lewiston.
i
I j.
Notice fur Publication.
Land office nt Lewiston, Idaho, Nov. 8. 1898.
Notice is hereby giv«.n that the following-named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, add that said proof will
be made before U. S. Land office at Lewiston. Idaho,
on Dec. 17. 1893. vlr. Edward A. Leachman for the
names the fullowin
continuous residence ur<
land, viz : Albert G. Ha
A'ex Roberts of Lewi-to
Burch, of Waha, Idaho.
prove
witnesses tn
\ and cultivât'
icock, Oscar LaU'n, a
. Idaho, and Henjimr.n
J. It. Wt T. Htgister.
Order to Show Cause Why Order of Sale o[,
Real Estate Should Not be Made.
In the Probate Court of Nei Perce County. Idaho
In the matter of the estate of William McOanou^h
insane.
ö. L. Phillips, the guardian of the estate ot wil
Ham McDonough, an *nsane person, having filed in
this court his petition, duly verified, praying for an
order of sale of all ot the real estate of su'd William
McDonough for the purpose therein set h.rth,
It is therefore ordered by the judge ot srt;J court,
that all persons intere -d in the said estate ot sa:J
William McDonouglr rppear before the said court ,.n
the 7th day of Deceit -er, 1898, at the hour of 11
o'clock a. tn. of the said day. at the court room of
said court at the cour- house In the city ot 1 t-w ist..n,
county of Nei Perce state of Idaho, t.» show cause
why an order should n it be granted t > the said ' >. t>
Phillips to sei I all of th * real estate of the aid Wc
liatn McDonough and that a copy of this order be
published at least f ree successive weeks tn th
Lewiston Teller, a newspaper printed and published
in said city and countv.
Dated Nov. 14th. 1898.
P. E. Stookev. Probat
l udga.
Timber Culture. Hinal Proof.--Notice for
Publication.
Unlt«l States t»nl Office. Lewiston, Uahu, Oct.
^
ber culture appli
ne qr w half se -jr se qr so qr
township No. 36 N.
jjw
N Sw
i ^ X vÄii Ä«"
j"-™-- ***»• WWi
Notice for Publication.
und owe« at Lewistun. waho, Oct.. 31. i898.
Notice U hereby «iven that the followme-n
1
! tinuousre.ide«« upon andcultivation of.
; Suiliv.i, of siickpou, l<taho; Ainey c. tiiiot, ..i
j —i s— a - k*
[,ep.rt«,cn. Q i interior, umtea sut.s Lana
«io i.
( ^ i# JohnT.^Vouburgh, contestam,
J B West, Bessie
Coates! Notice.
wnnamm
„ t | an ' a , fur
ry
William Fuller «»try N<>, 4269, made February 2>lh
1896, for swj-* ï*w*i nw qr lot b, nt-clion 22 anJ
lot I. section 21. township 33 n range î w, by William
Fuller contestée, in which it is alleged that said
William Fuller has wholly abondoned the said tract
; ÄÄ.'lÄiS
•* «>» U-«- s..». uni
that such «once b» £VRMv! r »iceïvir. a
rU.MuUen, Attorney for Contestant.
foaiesi Noilcc.
Dfpanment of lhe Int^riur. Uniu-l Sun-: l ani
Office. Uwüto». ij.h«, Ocu-bcr isth, iwt>.
a sufficient comesi atiizavii having s«-n meJ in
' jjaaffiz* by Charles v ^ook, ^i«iiesiant. ari.r.si
! iw?. for\ c «>/»ctiu* r £i, 5o2iUhV ,n i* 1 ^ ni'rangVa'.
,n eï riihn. taij nan«hl'in
abanioned th« said tract of land for murethdn hi« (6)
mt »nth* l«*t past ani next Trior to date btreof anJ
further thal he lus never established his rcsiden.
' '<h.7hu*
1 , f. cJ anl n« K '«cteJ to comply u.th \u,
homesteaJ law as to residence, cultivation and lui
provenant» said panics are hera.y notM.ci t. ,qv.u.
respond and offer evidence touching said allegation
December I6lh, 1808, before
States Land
yiuvcnicio* >aai pauivs aicnciv
.Lmrcioct j m mi i»ecember
oTÆŒîS: ,h *
F. tlfer dff.Jd- it.
Thompson has wholly abartionvj «be
land, for mort than six .. on.hs | aN i r

The said contestant h
tiled Oct. 18th. 1898. y>! tor'h t u ts which* sin
after due diligent'e, personal servit •* oi tins
cannot be made.it is hereby orJered und dir»*,
such notice be given bv atie an i proper pul
Charles H. Gakby. liée
Thoÿ. Mullen. Attornev for Contestant.
Coatezl N#||).e.
Department of tiie Inieri.jr, Ur!k J S'h
O ffice, Lewiston. IJjiio. 0< tober 22 Ic
A sufficient aftiduv t hav iug b«*en filed in t*
bv Frank O. SoJenn.in, contestant, n^.un
W. ThQinpsjon. t-ntrv No. *>191. njj.L J hh 1
for lots 17. 18. 19. M. 29 3»l. '1 and 32, , n
township 3.3. N. range 3. W by John W I
cpntestee, in which it is alleged that; *.;i ) j
pasi an I
18/
pri^r to the Jate hereof and further th
established his residence ou satJ tract. | j jj Ik t
wholly abanJoncJ Ihe sa'd tract and h is e»i :
failed and neglected to comply with the r L juiremi
o1 lhe homestead law. is to resident*« cui; ,
and iBiprovements. said parties are herelt n 1
to appear, respond and offer evident e loud, ng •>
allegation at lu o'clock a. m ,, n !>t . 29. Is -, !
fore the register anJ re . ver at the Tn ted
Land Office Tn Lewiston. Idaho.
The said contestant having, in a proper
filed October Isth, 1^98. set f..rth f uts wind . .
that after due dllligeme. personal service ■» 1
hotlC',' can not be made, it i> herel>> order «J *
directed that such notice le given by due anu pr,
publication
'Charles H Gakbv. K. , v <r.
fhos. Mulleb; Att > u.r CvnUetaut.
TTUd®
1). M. White, President
J. Alexander, Vice Preside«,
Geo. IT. Kester, Cashkr.
\V. F. Ketten bach Asst Caq j
Nütiäl
Conter ol Fourth and 1 lain Streets.
EW13T0M....... r....
3IrïOCÏT3F
\i r „, ,Sa'!' v I-f a ! , < Hu I,
j. Alex» !• r, 1 M . lot,'
m,, i j. W.K. tC.-ttei.Uach,
Ocorgtj 11. iCenter.
Sight exchange sold on
ind Europe.
th
e principal Cities of the Unite
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IDrihO
lANSRCTS A - fit
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d Stau H
John I*. Voll nu r p rey
S Votlmcr. Yin
li- W. Raves, L.I lurr
E5
KST • MTIOML •
___ OF LEWiSTON, IbflHS.___ —
<T f kapital and Surpl,
Strongest Bank in Idaho jjpfl]'
Fire proof vault for the use of customers for safe keeping of valuables Ilurvlar p,,.^
protected bi Saixent & Greenleaf lime lock: Correspondents in alt the principal cities of
Buy aud sell exchange.
The Boss Meat Market]
S. J. Fisher, Prop r
(Sui cessors to Dowd, Shaw & Co.)
Sausage.
Lard.
Game.
Fish.
Oysters.
Etc. Etc.
i
Fresh Meats.
Cured Meats.
Poultry.
Nothing but the yery Best Kept on Hand,
Adams Building, Main Street.
..^Mallory & Lydor. Livery Stable..-!
(Martin Coll'.n'.s Old Bland)
Lewiston, Idaho.
LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLE.
New Rigs, New Stock, Everything up to date. Calls will
receive prompt attention. 'Phone No. 17.
The Lewiston Dray Line.
S. I). Shurte, Proprietor.
Anything iu the way of drayage promptly attended to,
with reasonable charges. Household ' goods a specialty
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M, Bor:
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Wines, Liquors ond Cigars.
VW '/ V W W V V? 1 WW
The Secret of Success • • •
in cooking bread or pastry lies in the quality of the
flour used. Users of our High Grade Patent Process
flour have no cause for complaint on this score.
The demand for our product is daily increasing.
We have on hand bran* also shorts and chop.
THE LEWISTON MILLING CO
First St. & Snake Itiver Ave.
THE MINT s ^
J. P Walker & Co., Proprietors.
Choice Liquors, Wines, Brandies aud Cigars,
room in connection. Clark Building, Main Street.
A club
»J» »I» r#» ^ »S» J* ^ , | **f* > '
I Lewiston Bakery & Grocery.
•f» S. Wildenthaler, Prop.
Fresh bread ever) day, our own
special delivery.
Main Street.
Choice groceries,
pastry and fruits.
nub caudles,
Telephone No. 28.
r
TSie Sideboard.
s Lewiston's newest and neatest saloon. Wines, Liq
E uors and Cigars. Your patronage solicited. \
nmivniro «uol'k, main street. J
iim.iii m. »>1111 ,, I,Ii„m»mi., «.»»». «» »'.MOff
Lewiston Tailoring Establishment
Fine Tai'orïng a Specially.
A perfect fi nr .a niced. Cleaning aud repairing c**
ecuteq witli utaiuess and dispatch.
;meKER, Proprietor
Cigars by lïie Box a Specialty
—Al II1L
iCIedrvvdler Ciyar & News Company*

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