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The teller. (Lewiston, North Idaho) 1876-1878, December 30, 1876, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82007025/1876-12-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL.. I«
BÆVUKTOY, NORTH IDAHO, SATURDAY DUCFJIBER 30. 1870.
WO. II
THU TEILER.
Published Every Hntiirdny
1 —BY— #
A. LELAND & SON, ,
MONTGOMERY STREET
LEWISTON 1. 1.
Term* of Subscription, nt Coin Rates.
8rX0tBC0PY PKIt'ŸlMR...*.. ........;..........$3 00
" " Six Months................ 2 00
" " Two Months................. 1 00
Single Number.................................. 25
Prepayment In all cases demanded. All pa
pers discontinued when tiino of subscription
has expired.
Local Advertisements, la ratal :
Sheriff's Sale............. $20 00
District Court Summons....................... 25 00
Justice's Summons............................. 12 00
Probate Notice................................... 15 00
Business Advertisement* In Coin :
One Column (14 in.,) per tno................#.'-0 00
Une-half (7 in.,) " 20 Ü0
One-fourth (4 in.,) " .............. 4A *00
One-eighth (2 in.,) " 8 00
Single insertion of 1 in......................... 3 00
Each additional inch........................... 75
Professional and business Cards of one
square or less, per quarter................. 7 50
Good clean wheat, good butter. prediTivercd ;
to us at Lewiston, will be received in payaient ,
tor subscriptions at Lewiston cufeh rates ul time
of deliver 1 ,.
ALONZO LELAND. CTIAS., F. LELAND.
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W. G. LANÇrFORD,
Attorney -at-Law.
LEWISTON, I. T.,
Will practice in all the Court- in Idaho and
. Washingt on Territories.
. .. ' Utt.
ALONZO LELAND,
Attorney-at-La w,
LEWISTON, IDAHO TERUITOIIY.
Will practice in all the Courts of North Idaho,
and also the Supreme Court.
_n-tn___
H, W. STAINTÔN,
Physician and Surgeon,
LEWIST#; I. T,
Office and Residence—Montgomery Street
Head of Fourth. 1-tf
A. OILMAN
I.^ AT HIS
old sium; Roans
HEADOFMAIN STREET.
LEWISTO 1. r.
DAN McELWEE'S
V- 8 AI 0 a 1 ;
Montgomery Street,
il is wn® ip® sî a- ip»
At the stand formerly kept by L. E. Harris
next door eaat of the Postoffice. Call in
« .c I—tf
JAIWE6 ittcCOlUUCK.
* an i > - '.j <
OFFERS HIS SERVICES AS
O N REASONABLE TERMfL HIS Ex
perience and extensive knowledge of the
ranges of stock in the vicinity of Lewiston
gives him advantages in the business posessed
hy bat few if any other persons.
Enquire at Coburn A Ward well 's, Lewis
ton, I. T. I-tf
BLACKSMITHÜVG
BY
*. W. BENJAMINE I). JOHNSON.
* t.EWISTONI. T. '*
All general work in tbair line at rates to suit the
»i ne*. 1-tf
LOEWENBERG BROS.,
*
Wholesale and BcfSI Dealers
IN •
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
H
LEWISTON, IDAHO.
•'•Li . .
AVE CONSTANTLY ON HAND A
large and complete stock of
;
, GOODS OF THE BEST QUALITY AND
Dry floods. Clothing,
Boots and Shoes, Groceries
Crockery, Hardware,
Liquors, Cigars,
i Etc., Etc.,
T Ÿ WHICH WE CALL THE ATTENTION
of the public. Knowing well the wants
. of the people, we have endeavored to fill our
I store with a stock of goods that will meet their
requirements.
Prices Very Low.
1-tf
LOEWENBERG BROS.
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JOHN F. VOIE MEE,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
OF ALL KINDS.
I A GÉNÉRAL' ASSORTMENT OF DRY
I /■ Goods, Clothing, Groceries, Crockery
I and Glassware, Cutlery, Tobacco, Miners'
. G.oods, Etc., Etc., Etc.
■ ' Lewiston, f. T., Oct., 21, 1876. 1-tf
JACKSOiYS
Wonderful Oil.
Cures Rheumatism, strains, ear aud
toothache.
HOUSE OINTMENTS.
For sweeny, strains, old gores etc.,
VTN< ENT'S patent liquid soap for glass,
paint, etc. Liquid harness wash, also BED
BUG ERADICATOR AND VARNISH, all
manufactured by
J. K. VINCENT.
He also cures bunions, corns an\l warts. He
will sell any of the above mixtures in large
or small quantities. Cal! and sec him at Lew
iston 1. T. If not satisfied no pay required.
1—tf
LUNA STABLE
C Street, Between 3d and 4fb,
LEWISTON, I. T.
T
Feed, Livery & Sale Stable
Hyou Muck-a-31uck and no Ain
' H : 11 J ' ■ 4 .t ,
Stock Taken to Ranch.
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N. B. HQLBROOK.
î' i Proprietor.
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4'l Ll.m Mise.
A
We clip frem the Avalanche the follow
: j n R opinion of Prof. Clayton respecting the
Î great Atlanta Lode in Alturas Co., Idaho,
! This is but one of the rich lories that are in
i the mountains of our territory :
j This is un immense lode that has a course
! south about 70 degrees west, and north 70
; degrees east, and a dip south of 60 to 70
i degrees.
Beginning at the east end of the bill,
j near the west base of the high granite
; range iu Montezuma Gap, the crest of the
I hill ruus southwest about 3,000 feet ; it
j then curves around to the west and contin
j ties tolerably direct a distance of three
quarters of a mile, then turns north
i west towards the junction of Yuba
I Creek with the Middle Boise. The
! lode first ntnkes its appearanco near
j Montezuma Gqp, and runs through the
j crest of the hill ami across the head of
i Quartz Gulch at the Monarch mine,
j Continuing: its course along the north
j s ioe of the ridge about <1,000 feet, it
j "gain crosses the summit aud branches
j into three veins, which tend obliquely
down the southwest slope of the rid_e
j towards Yuba Creek. The croppings
j are traceable a distance of about two
I miles. Ail of it has been located and
I worked along the surface sufficiently to
bold die claims good under llie law. No.
developments have been made of a per
manent. character, except on the Mon
arch and Buffalo c'aims. Both of these
claims have been tapped by tunnels run
from Quartz Gulch, cutting the lode
about lUl) feet below the surface, and
about SO feet below the wuter line. The
Monarch tunnel gains depth below the
croppings as it runs east along the lode
into the high ridge towards Montezuma
Gap. At the east end of the Monarch
ground, the level will be 300 feet or
more below the surface.
1he width of this great lode between
the walls is from 40 to 100 feet, and
near the point where it crosses the sum
mit towards ^ uba Creek, it* js much
larger, hut its exact width at this poiut
has not been ascertained by any direct
i cross-cuts.
I The metallic contents are gold, native
j silver, ruby silver, brittle silver aud sub
I pintle of silver or silver glance. The
brittle silver or black sulphured, is the
most abundant tire, next in quality and
I value is the ruby silver. The native
' silver and silver glance are found only
1 in small quantities. f l he free gold con
I stitiites 20 to 40 per cent of the values.
The other minerals are from pyrites
Hn moiferate quantifies, disseminated
i through a friable grangular quartz,
gangue and a cabby, sottish granite,
: whtoh'S'fcms to he a part of the lode, us
j intercalated seams and masses between
! the layers of quartz. 1 saw no traces
î of cupper, zinc or lead. In fact this
lode carries the purest ores of silver that
L have ever seen in any extensive mine.
The Monarch Company's ground cuu
i sists of l^Up in length on the lode, be
j g i uuiug.,q, ta poi,nt some 300 or 400 feet
I southwest ,.Q^artz Gulch, aud ruu
( uiug east across the gulch into Montez
; uma hilj. A tunnel has been run from
î the north west nearly parallel with
the guich, until the vein was out at a
; point near the west eud of the claim,
then it turns east following the lode
under the gulch and into the high
ridge or hillabove mentioned.
The rich sc-aru of black swlphuret and
ruby ore varies in width from one to six
or seven feet, but along side of it is a
seam of pay rock that carries a good
percentage of free gold with silver ore
disseminated through it. This ore is
milled without roasting, but not with
good results,. T he yield in bullion rare
ly exceeds 40 per cent of the assay val
ues. The rich briuleeuiphuret and ru
by ore Is assorted from the mass and
shipped East for rednetiotti°' I eould
not learn the amount of orefshipped up
to date—common report says five or six
hundred tons—that assays from $800 to
<2,000 per ton. Judging from whait I
saw of the ore, T should place tab aver
age at about 61,000 per ton. The low
er grades uf ort arc taken to the com
pany's mill, just below Atlanta City, a
distance of about two and a-halif miles
from the mine. The second-qluss ore Is
said to have an average raîüe of âttàUt
$150 per ton, but whether thet sntn is
the product iu bullion, or is the asssly
\aluc, I did not learn. The orp I spir
hauled to the mill during the week of
my stay in the district, looked ttf Be
much richer, I should say not lésa thin
8800, assay value. The bnainftb ef
the company has! been kept as »eoret as
possible, and but few are permitted to
know the exact state of the facts. Two
thinps, however, are patent td any min
er of expérience and ordinary intelli
gence : 1st, the ore is unusually rich,
ami the quantity is large j 2d, |J»e mino
is being worked in a wasteful apd ex
travagant manner, without skill or sys
tem in the mining; departmetiW, aud
without proper appliances for the eco
nomical and efficient reduction of the
ores. If tjiis mine beJonginjl to a
ern company, the present management
would not bo tolerated a sioble day. In
the first place, the work at the mine
would be thoroughly surveyed and a
shaft started to a greater dearth ; with
hoisting works and pumps to put it down
1.000 feet for a "starter," aud at eacjh
100-fect leve ls would bo fun eàcti way to
open and drain the gronud, iïbtil tWHÿ
count the values in the reserve by «ho
million. In the second place, a good
40 stamp mill would be eroqted, with
furnaces and appliances of the best pat
terns to reduce all the orbs on the
ground, and stop thb folly, of sacking
and shipping the ore 2,000 miles to be
reduced. They would also have a va
gou road made down the river to Boise
City, so, that the bullion could be senk
ont daily by stage all the year f&rid/ tr
This would not be all the good'rwtilto
of such change. Every claim in M*
'listnet would be explored, many ofjiifr
nulls erected, the population increased
to two or three thousand souls, am!#«
bullion* product brought up to sevtBfâl
millions per annum. 1 •
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Pbotkction to Salmon.— The bill intro
duced in the Senate by Senator Mitchell for
the preservation of Columbia rlvèr'aiffmoh
fisheries, prohibits fishing for salmod by
any means whatever, except during the
months of May, June, July, abd then only
with seines having meshes not lese than
eight and » half inches diagonally from one
form r to the other, when extended. Vio
lations of the provisions of this bill are to
be punished with fines of from $500 to$l,
000 for first oflense, and subsequently by
hotli fine and imprisonment.— Portland
Sumdard, v
A young man in Bridgeport, Conn., poll
ed hack so hard when bis companion haul
p d him up to a bar to drink that one of his
arms wus broken.— Et, 1 * ■ ' *
Young men in Lewiston would do well
to pull back a little.—[E d.]
This entry has been found in . a Spring
field acconnt book, under date * of H4I:
"To the Jury as a present, £3 2s; foe link
er to Treat proper persons and witQSS'ses,
A similar entry could bs made elsewhere
if accounts were booked.—[Ep.] '
"Charlks," said a young wife to her
husband, as they sat at the window, water
ing the fashionables on their way to church,
"when yon die, and I get hold of the insur
ance money, I intend to 1 have a fur ease
and oaf just like that* lady has on over
there." •- - I

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