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The Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury, Conn.) 1917-1946, July 26, 1933, Image 1

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014085/1933-07-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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?<fe For 21 Warships Were Opened To-<
The Weather
' /
Cloudy Tonight and
Thursday—Showers
individual—Fastest Growing and Moat Popular Newspaper in Waterbury and the Naugatuck Valley—Progressive
- -*. , - . - ■■ ■ -
CLOSING
STOCKS
Last Minute News
.aSJi’S&Sifi
ESTABLISHED 1881 VOL U, NO. 174
MEMBER AUDIT BUREAU OF
CIRCULATION
WATERBURY EVENING DEMOCRAT. WEDNESDAY, /JULY 26. 1933
CIRCULATION BOOKS OPEN
TO ALL
« FOURTEEN PAGES PRICE THREE CENTS
RULES FOR EVERY EMPLOYER
MAYOR CURLEY IS BACK WARLIKE
Everyone Over
In Europe Holds
On To His Gun
One of Every Three Males
Is in Uniform—Neither
Austria Nor Germany
Intends to Pay War
Debts and the Only Way
' to Get It Is By Another
War
EUROPE WATCHING
ROOSEVELT PLAN
New York, July 26.—(UP)—A
, six-week tour of Europe has* con
verted Mayor James M. Curley of
Boston to an anti-pacifist and pos
sibly militaristic point of view, he
reported to-day on his return
aboard the liner Bremen.
Accompanied by his four chil
dren and. a welcoming: delegation
from Boston, Curley boarded a
special qar for home at 1 p. m.,
EUT.
"It Is hard to visit Europe and
return a pacifist," he said. “While
all talk of jioace and disarmament,
everyone holds on to his gun. Prac
tically one of every three males
there Is in uniform.”
He said neither Austria nor Ger
many intended paying government
al debts, and the only way to col
lect them was by another war.
Mie Boston mayor was taken off
the Bremen at quarantine and
brought ashore on a cutter, miss
ing regular ship news reporters,
(Continued on Page *.)
BIG MINE FIGHT
' STARTED IN THE
PENN REGIONS
United Mine Workers and
Operators Insist They
Have the Right to Or
ganize the Unions
Unlontown, Pa., July 26—(UP)
—The national Industrial recovery
act has precipitated a strike in the
Pennsylvania coal fields which
threatened today to grow Into the
most serious mine labor fight In
this region since the major strike
of 1922. Troop A of the Pennsyl
vania state police nrrived today to
assist local authorities, after Gov
ernor Plnchot was Informed that
three coal company deputies, a
mine foreman and two miners
were Injured yesterday.
Adherents of the United Mine
Workers of America Insist upon
their right to organize under the
national Industrial recovery act,
while mln'e operators, citing the
same act, are seeking to form com
pany uiiions. William Feeney,
president of the fourth district.
United Mine Workers, charged
miners were Intimidated by com
pany representatives. The sole de
mand of the strikers, he feld, was
the right to organize. Strike lead
ers predicted that by the end of
this week they would be able to
close down 90 per cent qf the mines
In Washington, Greene, Fayette.
Westmoreland and Somerset coun
ties. *
LIQUOR CONTROL
COMMISSION IS
CALLED ILLEGAL
Judge Harney of Hartford
Also Declared Barber
Commission Was Not
Legally Named By Gov.
Hartford, Conp, July 26.— (UP)
—Judge WHUam Harney in police
court to-djur held appointment of
the Connecticut liquor control
commission was Illegal.
The assertion came when Judge
Harney dismissed a case against a
local barber on the ground that
appointment of the barbers' com
mission also was Illegal. He
claimed that the liquor control
commission, like the barbers’ com
mission, is Illegal on grounds that
appointments were made by Goy
ernor Wilbur L. Cross before an
amendment to the liquor law w**
passed to make the law operative,
and thf governor had not renamed
the commission a'fter that
Senator Frank 8. Bergin of New
Haven and Major John Buckley
of Hartford, members of the liquor
commission said the liquor law
became operative on its passage.
i ..
SOLVED THE THEFT
New Britain, Conn. July . 2*.—
(UP)—Police last night arrested
Frank Tiskorskl and Anthony Kad
7,1 a us Mb. thus solving, they nail},
the rheft of a car and the rob
bery ot a store. /The car, stolen
from Felix Slmont, was loaded
with merchandise taken from a
•downtown shop, police said.
WILEY POST IS
GUEST OF NEW
YORK TO-DAY
Officially Honored for His
Feat — The Mollisons
Are Still Nursing In
juries—Lindberghs Are
Surveying
New York, July 26—(UP)—
New York city forgot municipal
problems and stock market gyra
tions to-day to give Wiley Post an
other of its famous receptions—
one that will outdo the demonstra
tion two years ago when he rode
in triumph through ticker tape
with Harold Gat(y after his first
flight around the world.
A parade up Broadway, a recep
tion at City Hall, and a luncheon
was part of the program. There
had been talk of using the Winnie
Mae in the parade, but the plan
(Continued on Page 2.)
ALL CABLEGRAMS TO
EUROPE AFFECTED
RY NEW AGREEMENT
BOSTON GANG
THREATEN TO
KILL BREWER
Boston, July 28.—(ITP)—A
blackmail gang that preys on
makers of 3.2 beer was sought
by state and local police today
In connection with death
threats and a demand of $15,
000 received by Theodore C.
Halfcnrcffcl, widely - known
Boston brewer.
It was disclosed that the
brewer has been guarded con
stantly since receiving the
threats in a mysterious letter
last week, and that an attempt
to trap the would-be extortion
ists in a Kahant hotel Satur
day night failed. The rack
eteers failed to keep a rendez
vous with him when he ap
peared at the hotel with a
dummy package supposedly
containing $15,000 In bank
notes.
Collect Cablegrams and
Wireless Messages Will
Be Refused Mnsmis
sion After August 1—
Exceptions Made on
Lines to Canada and
Latin America
New York, July 26—(UP)—By
joint agreement of a,U communica
tion companies, "collect" cable
grams and wireless messages be
tween the United States and for
eign countries over transatlantic or
tranH-Paclflc systems will be re
fused transmission after August 1.
JThe effect of the agreement will
be to increase heavily the costs of
concerns doing a heavy interna
tional cable business at the pres
ent rate of dollar exchange. *
Decline of the United States dol
lar abroad, and Insistance by for
eign telegraph' administrations
upon settlement of international
(Continued on Page 8.1
Final News Flashes
CUMMINGS AFTER KIDNAPERS
Washington, July 26.—(UP)—Attorney
General Cummings, after discussing with Presi
dent Roosevelt today methods of combating the
kidnaping racket, indicated that the federal
government was prepared to finance a drive
aimed at stamping out the wave of abductions.
“The fight must be wop,” Cummings said.
MILK PRODUCERS STATE PRICE
Hartford, Conn., July 26.—(UP)—A res
olution calling upon the milk control board to
establish a price of 7 cents a quart for milk of
3.7 butterfat content, to be paid producers by
distributors, was adopted by producers today.
The demand will be presented to the board later
today.
CITIES SERVICE STOPS PUBLIC SALES
New York, July 26.—(UP)—Henry L.
Doherty & Company has discontinued the direct
sale to the public of securities of Cities Service
company and its subsidiaries, it was announced
today.
WHY ITALIAN PLANE CAME DOWN
• Hampton, Prince Edward Island, July 26.
—(UP)—The seaplane I-Rovi, of Gen. Italo Bal
bo’s squadron of 26 ships en route from Shediac
to Newfoundland, was forced down here today
by a broken water pump.
NINE DEAD FROM BAD LIQUOR
Philadelphia, July 26.—(UP)—Seven men
; and two women have died from the effects of bad
liquor in West Philadelphia within the past 24
hours, police reported today
V , «
•'l'-uZ -i St*'- w-* . <■*. ' i.irif 'I'M ..
Plane Crash Fatal To Lithuanian Flyers
After flying across the Atlantic on an attempted non-stop flight from New York to Kdvno, Uth
uanla, Captain Stephen Darius and Stanley qircnas, Lithuanian flyers, were killed only 375 miles from tliclr
goal when their plane crashed In the woods nkSoldln. Germany. Here’s a view of Pie wreckage._
OFFENSIVE OF
PRESIDENT IS
MOVING FAST
Re-emOMyment Drive Can
not Be Stopped—-Re
covery Administrator
Johnson Said Success
Is. Assured
■ (By United Press)
President Roosevelt's re-employ
ment offensive was pushed for
ward to-day on every sector.
Recovery Administrator Johnson
said success of the drive was as
sured by advance pledges of
thousands of employers that they
would sign the voluntary agree
ment to spread employment and
fix minimum wages for all.
But he emphasized there would
be no relaxation in the effort to
bring every business man, large or
small, under the blanket code.
President Roosevelt asked the
aid of all state governors.
Preparations were rushed for in
tensive campaigning In every city
A new report from the federal
reserve board supported the ad
ministration's contention that mass
purchasing power must be in
creased at once. The board's fig
ures showed that while industrial
production In June was tho high
est since July, 1931, employment
and wages lagged behind.
The American Federation of La
bor reported that over 11,000,000
persons still are out of work, al
though more than 1,500,000 have
(Continued on Page 2.)
Beer Drinkers of
New Britain to
Pav Five Cents
New Britain, Conn, July 2G—
(UP)—Beer drinkers of this city
found themselves in luck again to
day when beer went o’n sale in all
taverns at five cents a glass.
The Tavern Owners' association
decided to return to the nicklc
schooner scale In order to compete
with the few taverns which refused
to Join the organization and sell
beer at 10 cents a glass only. The
organization hopes to thus force
the recalcitrant tavern keepers to
fall in line and Join In a standard
scale of prices. Meantime tho con
sumption of beer increased. ■
AIR HEROES OF
ITALY OFF ON
THE NEXT 1EG
Left Shediac, New Bruns
wick, Before,Nine This
Morning — They Have
Been Noted in Many
Places
BY C. AVARI> WHITK
(United Press Correspondent)
Shediac, N. B.( July 26.—(UP)
—Italy’s seaplane fleet, homeward
bound after its visit to the United
States, left to-day for Shoal Har
bor, N. F., whence it will fly the
Atlantic.
General Italo Balbo, command
ing the fleet, took off at 8:48 u.
m„ EDT in the 1-BALB, with the
other planes following.
General Italo Balbo received re
ports of excellent weather early
to-day and ordered a quick take
off of his armada of 24 sea
planes for the flight to Shoal Har
bor, Nfd. He planned to make
the start as soon as he had pro
nounced all the machines fit for
the trip.
By 8:56 a. m. all the 24 planes
had risen from Shediac Bay and
had formed in their groups of
three for the flight across the gulf
of St Lawrence and along the
southern Newfoundland coast for
Shoal Harbor.
The airline distance was about
515 miles, but the plotted course
(Continued on Page 7.)
Waterburv Men
on Committee to
Support Code
New Haven, Conn, July 26—
(CP)—A code of ethics to apply to
problems peculiar to this state and
to augment the national code to be
approved in' Washington will be
drafted by building contracts and
allied industries of Connecticut.
Representatives of these indus
tries met here and yesterday aft
ernoon banded together under the
name of the Construction League
of Connecticut. B. W. Bartlett,
of Hartford, was elected president
and R. J. Vaughn, Waterbury, was
named secretary. T. G. Smith, Wa
terbury, was elected chairman of
the finance committee.
Arrests Are. Made In The
Killing Of Sheriff And
His Youthful Prisoner
Charleston, W. Va., July 26.—
(OP)—Two women and four men
were held for questioning to-day
after gunmen folded an official
car, killed one deputy sheriff,
wounded another, and captured a
prisoner In order to assassinato
him. Homer Harper, 19, pleaded
guilty to robbery with flrenrms
yesterday and was sentenced to 25
yeari In the penitentiary, but he
boasted he would ‘’never serve
time.‘’ Louise Fraser, 25, kissed
him goodbye as he was taken from
the jail here to be transferred to
the staet penitentiary.
Deputy Sheriff O. L. Dudley took
the wheel of the car designated to
transport Harper, and Deputy Roy
Shumblln went nlong as guard.
Outside of Charleston unother
t>-r ,»■
automobile overtook the deputies'
car, and a volley of bullets was
fired at the officers. Deputy
Shamblln was killed. Dudley,
wounded, stopped the car.
Harper was taken out of the
officers’ car by the Runmen and
carried away In the other automo
bile. Hours later hie body, still
handcuffed, was found In a car
parked In Huntington, W. Va.
Police Chief John Britton of
Charleston, and Sheriff R. C.
Andrews said they believed an
elaborate plot to free Harper had
been laid, and then the prisoner
had been double crossed and killed
because Of some gang grievance.
Miss Fraser and another woman
were- arrested, with four men be
lieved to have been associated
with Harpelr.
Simple Explanation
Of Agreement They
Are Asked To Sign
BUSINESS MEN
OF CITY START
THEII^ PLANS
Over 200 Merchants Gath*
ered To-day and Began
Work to Back Up Call of
the Government
Enthusiastically endorsing the
movement in Waterbury to co
operate with the provisions of the
national recovery act, more than
200 leading business men of the
city gathered today in the alder
manic chamber of the municipal
building and laid tentative plans
for the adoption of a uniform sys
tem of wage raising and opening
and closing hours. Every kind of
a business that the city boasts of
was represented at the session.
Following a lengthy discussion
Chairman Joseph Sugenheimer of
the Merchants’ bureau was. auth
orized to name a committee of ten
or more, representing the various
business groups of Waterbury, to
formulate a program for adoption
. (Continued on Page 2.)
Taken as the Basis of President Roose
velt’s Re-employment Campaign
All Employers Will Receive Copies
on Thursday
15,000 TELEGRAMS HAVE BEEN
SENT TO THE WHITE HOUSE
_ >
By H. 0. THOMPSON
(United Press Staff Corresi>ondcnt)
Washington, July 26— (UP)—Here is a simple and au
thoritative explanation by Recovery Administrator Hugh
Johnson 6f just what every employer is asked to do to put
in effect the voluntary agreement which is the basis of Pres
ident Roosevelt’s re-employment campaign:
“You will receive in the mail, about July 27th, an en
velope with two pieces of paper and an addressed envelope
in it. One piece of paper is the president’s agreement. Sign
that on the dotted lines and fill out the information called
for. Put it in the addressed envelope and mail it. Then put
it into effect at once.
“On August 1st sign the other piece of paper which
says that you have carried out your agreement. Turn it in
to your post office. Then you will be given the blue eagle of
N. R. A. on a poster or window sticker.
_- ■ — I "Take this to your store or shop
First Business Man In
Nation To Win The Blue
Eagle Symbol Of Govt.
Washington, July 26 — (UP) — George P. Killan, Wash
ington businessman, had the honor of being the first in the nation
to post in his window the blue eagle symbol of cooperation in the
re-employment drive.
The eagle went up in Killan’s paper box salesroom yesterday
and today he reported that the day’s cash business was the largest
in three years.
NAVY DEPARTMENT
OPENED RIDS ON 21
WARSHIPS TO-DAY
It Was the Largest Num=
ber of Bids Ever Re
ceived in One Day in the
History of the Depart
ment — Millions to Be
Spent
Washington, July 26—(L!r,)—T
The navy department today opened
bids for 21 warships, the largest
number of bids ever received in
one day in the history of the de
partment.
The bids included proposals for
the construction of two aircraft
curriers, one heavy cruiser, one
light cruiser, eight I860 ton de
stroyers, seven 1500 ton destroyers
and two submarines.
The bids were as follows:
Aircraft carriers, Newport News
(Continued on Page 8.)
FOURGUNMENDO
HOLD-UP TRICK
ON POLICE CAR
Kill One Sheriff, Wound
Another, Steal Lone
Prisoner, Take Him
Away, and Kill Him
Charleston, W. Va., July 26.—
(UP)—A police car en route to
the state penitentiary with a prls
jner was abushed early to-day by
tour gunmen, who killed one dep
uty- sheriff and wounded another.
In order to capture and slay the
prisoner.
The body of the convicted man,
itill handcuffed, was found in nn
automobile abandoned In an alley
In Huntington, W. Va.
The revolver bullets which
stopped officers' car shortly after
it had left Charleston, killed Dep
uty Itoy Shambltn. and wounded
Deputy G. L. Dudley, who was
driving.
The deud prisoner was Homer
(Continued on Page 8.)
PRESIDENT NOT
WORRIED ABOUT
THE PATRONAGE
Sunny Jim Farley Does
That While President
Prescribes Civil Service
Law for Job Seekers
By RAYMOND CLAPPER
(Copyright, 1933. by United Press)
Washington, July 26.—(UP)—
Patronage troubles have rolled off
President Roosevelt's back like
water off a duck.
This Job of rewarding the faith
ful has made life miserable for
most presidents. It made Wilson
so angry he once refused to see
anyone seeking a Job. Harding
mostly okayed names us they were
put before him by Harry Daugh
erty, his political manager, or else
named personal friends whom he
(Continued on Page 2.)
DISCIPLINE IS
GOOD IN FOREST
CAMPS OF CONN
Hartford, Conn, July 26—(UP)
—Discipline aipong youths in Con
necticut reforestation camps is on
the upgrade, a report compiled by
Captain George C. McFarland, ad
jutant of the fifth district of the
corps, Indicated today.
According to the report, 20
Connecticut men were dismissed
from state camps during June for
disobeying rules, while only two of
3000 had been discharged up to
Tuesday for similar reasons.
Officials revealed a rapidly in
creasing number of youths were
receiving honorable discharges
(torn reforestation camps to accept
regulur positions and considered
this an Indication of Increased em-,
ployment.
and display it prominently, it you
need more posters or stickers you
can get them inter from a dealer.
If you want to use this symbol on
your goods or automobiles or
trucks or anywhere else in connec
tion with your business, you are
authorized to do so. But do not do
this either now or later if you have
not signed the agreement or do
not have it in effect. It can only
result in conflict with the presi
dent’s request and may cause you
serious trouble.
“What does all this mean? It
means that if you employ any fac
tory or mechanical worker or ar
tisan you will not pay him less
than 40 cents an hour or work him
more than 35 hours a week, except
that if you were paying loss than
40 cents for that kind of work on
July 15, 1929, you can pay that
rate now, but not less than 30 cents
an hour.
“As to all other employes—those
on a weekly rate—you will pay not
(Continued on Page 8.)
DRYS REFUSE TO
STAY LICKED IN
THIS STRUGGLE
They Are Going to Try to
Declare State Conven
tion Illegal — Supreme
Court May Act
By LYLE C. WILSON
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, July 26—(UP)—
Prohibitionists revealed today that
contesting the legality of state
conventions in which the repeal
amendment had been ratified by
delegates elected at large.
The move contemplated by the
drys Is based on a decision of the
supreme court of Maine, which
held that delegates to the stute
convention must b elected by dis
tricts.
The dry challenge was directed
specifically at New York and New
Jersy. Canon William Sheafe
Chase outlined th’e reasoning under
which delegat-at-large convnetlona
approving rpeal are to be chal
lenged.
“I am reasonably confident. ’’
Chase told the United Press, "that
(Continued on page 7)
TREASURY BALANCE
Washington, July 26—(UP)—•
The treasury net balance for July
24 was $826,748,459.48.

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